Local and VPN IP subnets are both 192.168.1.x

K A
K A used Ask the Experts™
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Our LAN uses 192.168.1.x IP addresses.  One of our vendors has just required us to connect to their VPN, then RDP to one of their computers to conduct business.  Their network also uses 192.168.1.x IP addresses.  Our network is small, so the effects have been minimal, but only by luck it would seem.  Sometimes we are forced to re-login to our own file server, and this is cumbersome and inconvenient.  How can we adjust settings on our end to minimize/eliminate IP address conflicts?  Our networking equipment is SOHO.  One perhaps obvious solution would to change our entire subnet internally, but that just doesn't seem like the best way to proceed.  Advice please?
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Joe FulginitiNetwork Engineer

Commented:
What VPN client are you using to connect?
Christian KAZADiITHelpdesk Specialist
Commented:
Hi

The only professional way to do this is to do a network re-addressing. If by chance you have a DHCP server, this would minimize the time blow. it's a lot cleaner than anything else.

Christian K.
Top Expert 2013
Commented:
Basic rules of routing state that subnets (network IDs) in any two network segments must be different in order for routing to take place.  If using a VPN client, as I assume you are if you are assigned certain options you may be able to access one remote device, but not multiple.  The only solution to work properly is to change your local addressing.  For this reason it is a good reason to never use common subnets like:
192.168.0.x, 192.168.1.x, 192.168.2.x, 192.168.111.x, 10.0.0.x, or 10.10.10.x
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SeanSystem Engineer
Commented:
Usually you need the networks to be different. This is a big problem with VPN but it's pretty difficult to fully get around. Need to change a network to a different subnet.
K A

Author

Commented:
Thanks, Joe... It's a Fortinet client.

Thanks, Christian... our router does DHCP for us.  We'll probably use that to adjust our IP addresses.

Thanks, Rob and Sean also... At least there's a little comfort to me that I kind of knew what the (simple) solution would be...

I'm going to leave this question open for a little longer in case somebody has a new, genius idea,,,   arrrghh... I blame the vendor AND us for choosing such a popular IP subnet.
Top Expert 2013
Commented:
Same subnets is probably the most common VPN question on EE.

Pete Long explains how you can use the same subnet at both ends with Cisco routers. It's quite a read and quite brilliant.
https://www.petenetlive.com/KB/Article/0001446
K A

Author

Commented:
Thanks, Rob... Nicely done... Don't think we can do that with a $100 Linksys router... :)

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