SBS2011 moving the Exchange database on the same partition as the pagefile. Good idea Y/N?

Have a SBS2011Server scheduled to be decommissioned by the end of the year. In the meantime looking to free up space on the partition that data is housed on. Current partitions are C:\ operating system; D:\ data and exchange database; and E:\ pagefile.

Because of other factors it makes sense to move the exchange database to the E:\ drive which will free up plenty of space on the D:\ drive where data is located.

Any concerns running the page file on the same partition as the exchange database?
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WORKS2011Austin Tech CompanyAsked:
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Wayne88Commented:
I have seen a client run SBS on one partition for all system, exchange db, and page file.  Didn't have any issue.  Not ideal but worked for them (about 50 users environment).

Whoever set it up used RAID5 configuration with 10k rpm SAS drives.  I guess that helped.
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WORKS2011Austin Tech CompanyAuthor Commented:
@Wayne88, thanks for the quick response. I've managed many SBS on the same partition and it's been fine, agree with you. Thought I read when the drives are split up into partitions it's better to leave the pagefile on C and exchange on the separate partition, not 100% about it though and why I'm asking. I also configure RAID5. Seems like forever since setting up a SBS environment since MS did away with it. Really appreciate the feedback. The server is scheduled for decommission and there are only 20 users, not saying I want to configure the server in a way that's not recommended however if performance doesn't take a hit and it last until decommission I'm fine with this.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
it makes sense to move the exchange database to the E:\ drive  ..... Any concerns running the page file on the same partition as the exchange database?

No. That should not cause any issues. Moving the Exchange DB will gain the most space. Make sure it makes sense to also move the page file after gaining the space. It may not be necessary.

Run Disk Cleanup (Clean up System Files) to get rid of old files.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Thought I read when the drives are split up into partitions it's better to leave the pagefile on C

You probably can do this after moving Exchange DB.
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pgm554Commented:
Why not just delete the E drive and extend the D drive using the disk admin tool?
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Wayne88Commented:
"Thought I read when the drives are split up into partitions it's better to leave the pagefile on C and exchange on the separate partition, not 100% about it though and why I'm asking."

It's definitely best to leave the pagefile on C if that is the first partition you created.  Any partition after the first will be slower and if you group the pagefile and Exchange DB into the last partition then you are moving them into the slowest partition.  Therefore, it will result in slower performance but I am unsure of how much slower it will be.  You can only know by benchmarking the before and after results.

This is may help you: https://larryjordan.com/articles/improve-raid-speed-with-partitions/
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pgm554Commented:
Most systems rarely make use of the swap file and when they do ,the system comes to a crawl.
The only reason for a swap file these days is in case of a crash you can do a memory dump.
In most SSD based disk systems you don't really need one anymore.
SSD based system,8gb of ram or more ,turn off indexing and don't even bother with a swap file.

In most systems anything past 2 gb is a waste.
Just set the swap to static (2048 and 2048)and forget about it.

As for speed of partitions,if you're using a caching raid controller ,you won't notice any difference in speed.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I'm inclined to agree with pgm554 - if the ONLY thing currently on E: is the pagefile, then move it to D:, delete E:, and extend D:.  Done.  If your C: drive has plenty of space, you can move it there instead.  The pagefile DOES get used, but the idea is to move "little referenced" information from RAM into the pagefile as RAM is needed.

Nothing should create a serious problem, however, I would caution that it CAN have a (likely minimal) impact on performance depending on the disk configuration.
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WORKS2011Austin Tech CompanyAuthor Commented:
@pgm544 the D: partition is 1T and not partitioned as GPT. It cannot be extended.

In reference to "Most systems rarely make use of the swap file and when they do ,the system comes to a crawl. The only reason for a swap file these days is in case of a crash you can do a memory dump. In most SSD based disk systems you don't really need one anymore. SSD based system,8gb of ram or more ,turn off indexing and don't even bother with a swap file." this is a SBS2011 on a Windows Server platform, I'm certain the pagefile is necessary. Am I missing something here?

@John "Run Disk Cleanup (Clean up System Files) to get rid of old files," will do. Good idea.

@Lee W, MVP "if the ONLY thing currently on E: is the pagefile" unfortunately there's archived data on the drive which can be moved but may be better to leave where it is.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Can you post a screen shot of disk management?
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pgm554Commented:
A large page file is not needed.
Maybe 2 gigs at the most these days.
As i alluded to,when you run out of ram ,the system begins to swap to disk and that brings the system to a crawl.
As for gpt ,you don't need a gpt volume to extend partition,ntfs works fine.
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