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tiras gansFlag for United States of America

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Server room design review

Can you see if reasonable to have 2-post rack this way?  Attached.  Any other pros/cons please?  Designing server room/lab.

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Assuming the lines in front of the 4-post racks denote the front doors the cold air has to go into the middle of the racks because it has to go into the front of servers. That would mean hot air bellowing at shelving and bench. I would flip them around so the hot air was in the middle of the two rows, then duct it to the aircon input. Human working environment would be more pleasant, I hate working in the hot aisle. You can squeeze the racks together more that way as well.

Look up hot aisle/cold aisle containment.
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oh good point.   thanks Andy!  
what do you mean squeeze racks more together?
If your air conditioning works well, no need to squeeze the racks together. You can if you wish, but so long as air flow is good, no need if you do not wish to.

Overall organization of the room (as I noted) is really up to you.
not sure what squeeze racks together mean?
It means the back of the first rack is a foot away or so from the back of the other rack . I would keep them apart to allow for wiring
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Put a lid over the racks and a door or plastic curtain over the front so all the hot air goes out the duct and into the HVAC.

You have to be able to pull a server all the way out, so the minimal gap in the cold aisle is about 2m, that 2m is wasted most of the time. If you have a raised floor or top-of rack cabling rather than just a jumble of wires all over the floor you can cut the hot aisle at the back of rack down to less than 1m.

Can't see any improvement in redundancy from the 180 degree rotation rather than just mirroring the racks left and right though.
Thanks Atlas.  So basically all in one line facing the door.
Get the sizing of your HVAC correct, for now and maximum capacity! for future growth!

We've just had our HVAC units replaced now, and we've had them both connected together, so they now load balance, so both HVAC units are not on FULL POWER, both distribute the load. (speak to HVAC company!).

We also have suspended floor and ceiling, it makes cabling easier...

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(the other aircon units were left in place as redundancy, there are the old units..)
So more like this better?

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That works well . More room for air to move around and that is good.

As much or more room for you to move around.

Convenient for wiring as well
all our server and network racks run in front of our aircon units with enough space all around front and rear and sides of 42u racks.

Air Temp at front of racks is 20 deg C, temperature at rear of racks is 20 deg C.

all our racks have fan trays at the top of each rack to extract hot air.
Shove it back more towards the wall, what's the sense in making the nasty hot area any bigger than necessary?
I like to have space between racks for vertical cable management. 4" channels is good for many environments.

[edit: previous comment removed as I was not on an up to date view of this thread and the design changed]
Overall air flow needs to be considered in any positioning.
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CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) ie the software used to design the shape of racing cars, planes, rockets etc is used to design the airflows in major datacentres these days, thats the airflow in and around all the equipment and cabinetry
Thanks and good luck with your new surroundings.
No thanks, hope you cook when you're in it your server room.
Cook?  Yeah, I'll cook some pancakes fried eggs on the top of my junipers!
Cook as in it's going to be boiling hot working in there due to the poor design you have chosen to go with judging from the accepted solution.