Checkboxes created in report (Visual Studio 2010) do not display properly in SSRS or render properly when exported to Word

I'm trying to recreate a report for a client, and in that report they have three fields Night, Weekend, Holiday (0 or 1) which need to be displayed as check-boxes.
In Visual Studio, I've made the column for these values .2" wide, have set the font to Wingdings, and have the expression which looks like:

= IIF(Fields!Night.Value = 0, chr(0168), chr(0254))
& IIF(Fields!Wknd.Value  = 0, chr(0168), chr(0254))
& IIF(Fields!Holiday.Value = 0, chr(0168), chr(0254))

In VS, this displays like the following image:2018-09-05-SSRS-Checkbox1.jpgBut after I deploy the report and run it in SSRS it looks like the following, making it difficult for the client to review the data in the report.2018-09-05-SSRS-Checkbox2.jpgIf my client exports this from SSRS to a .pdf file, it renders properly, but the client needs to export the report to Word (so that it can be edited) and when they do, that column automatically resizes itself so that these stacked checkboxes display horizontally.  My client recognizes that they can simply resize the column, but would prefer not to have to do so.2018-09-05-SSRS-Checkbox3.jpgI've tried inserting a carriage return/line feed between each character in the report textbox expression, but that results in extra spacing between the checkboxes.

I've also tried using 'X' and 'o' with the wingdings font, which places an X inside the checkbox, but the formatting issue still persists.

Does anyone have any recommendations?
LVL 51
Dale FyeOwner, Developing Solutions LLCAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

John TsioumprisSoftware & Systems EngineerCommented:
Well you are not alone with this problem..lets say that a lot of people want to display checkboxes on SSRS reports....well this guy here has developed an image based solution that looks good
0
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
(Potentially stupid question)  Why are we displaying a checkbox, which implies user interaction, on an SSRS report which by definition does not allow user interaction?

It would be more intuitive to display something that does not imply that it's editable, such as the value itself, or as John says come up with an image.
0
Dale FyeOwner, Developing Solutions LLCAuthor Commented:
John,

I'll take a look at that article.

Jim,

Because the SSRS report has to emulate a state approved form.  The checkbox is not designed to be editable, but to merely replicate the appearance of this state approved form.

I've mentioned to the client that if they need to edit the report, after running it, then those changes should go in the database, but have lost that argument.
0
Rowby Goren Makes an Impact on Screen and Online

Learn about longtime user Rowby Goren and his great contributions to the site. We explore his method for posing questions that are likely to yield a solution, and take a look at how his career transformed from a Hollywood writer to a website entrepreneur.

Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
Ahh.  That would do it.  The image route will probably be less aggrevation then trying to get a checkbox to render correctly both in SSRS and in an export to Word.
0
Russell FoxDatabase DeveloperCommented:
Split the single row into three rows (red lines), and then remove the borders between the rows where it's supposed to look like a single row (yellow area):
Row split
0
Dale FyeOwner, Developing Solutions LLCAuthor Commented:
Russell,

I attempted to do that, but was unable to merge the cells in other columns that should span multiple rows, in many cases 5 or 6 lines of text.

Dale
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
SSRS

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.