Router's WAN LED turn off and on continuously.

Hi there,
I have to provide internet connection to three offices which are far away from each other. The scheme adopted was to take a single cable from the main ADSL+ router and take to first office (Offiice-1). A TP-Link router in Office-1 is then used to provide connection to Office-1, Office-2 and Office-3 (Office-2 and Office-3 are at almost same distance, but in different direction). Cable used is Cat5.
The problem is when PC is connected directly to cable coming from ADSL+ router, internet works fine. But when the same cable from ADSL+ router is plugged in the WAN port of TP-Link router, the WAN connection LED turns on for brief duration, then goes off for almost same duration, then again turns on. This cycle is continuously repeated.
Please tell where is the problem and how to rectify it.

P.S: Both straight wire scheme and cross-over wiring schemes have been used with no effect.
Malik AbuzarAsked:
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JustInCaseCommented:
On router - check device log.
PC - check speed and duplex and IP address when connection is established.
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Malik AbuzarAuthor Commented:
PC - check speed and duplex and IP address when connection is established

Speed=. 10 Mbps
IP Address=Assigned by DHCP server of ADSL+ router.
How to check Duplex?

On router - check device log.
Connecting WAN
DIsconnected
Connecting WAN
Disconnected
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Malik AbuzarAuthor Commented:
Checked through Power Shell Command, Full Duplex is true
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PerarduaadastraCommented:
Why do you need a router in Office-1? If there is no requirement for the various offices to be on different subnets I would have thought a switch would have done the job better and no additional routing would be required.
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Malik AbuzarAuthor Commented:
I want to use already present equipment. I have one D-Link DIR 300 Device and two ADSL routers which can work in Ethernet mode .
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Malik AbuzarAuthor Commented:
Why do you need a router in Office-1? If there is no requirement for the various offices to be on different subnets I would have thought a switch would have done the job better and no additional routing would be required.

By the way, that would be a good idea to purchase a network switch instead.
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Qlemo"Batchelor", Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
You are talking about "ADSL Router" and "Ethernet mode" - can you clarify?
Your setup makes sense if the ADSL Device is in bridge mode (running as modem only), and the DSL login is performed on TP. "WAN port" usually means the router tries to establish the connection, and performs the public IP NAT required. If the TP tries to authenticate, while the ADSL device already has done that, it explains the on/off status.
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Malik AbuzarAuthor Commented:
Problem was in cable. The guy that crimped the jacks at ends didn't follow pairing scheme. He crimped the jack with all pairs adjacent to each other, so in longer cable (~100ft) noise increased and routers/TP was not able to connect.
Once I re-crimped the jacks, it is working fine. Though speed is still 10mpbs.
Thanks all who tried to help me.
Cheers!
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PerarduaadastraCommented:
Well, if the speed is only 10Mbps I’d challenge the assertion that it’s working fine...
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Malik AbuzarAuthor Commented:
Well, if the speed is only 10Mbps I’d challenge the assertion that it’s working fine...

It is working fine, but not good, as LAN transfers are too slow.

Can anybody please help me to rectify the issue behind low speed.
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PerarduaadastraCommented:
The powershell command will return the duplex status of the NIC in the computer you’re running the command on but not information about the link speed, and won’t tell you anything about the device on the other end of the cable.
Go into the management pages of the various routers you are using, and where the option is available set the interface to full duplex and the link speed to auto. Both aspects of the interface might be controlled by a single setting, in which case choose auto or auto-negotiate (same thing).
However, using those ADSL routers simply as switches is rather like using a screwdriver as a hammer - it can work, but rarely works well...

A perfectly adequate used gigabit switch can be bought on eBay for a very modest outlay, and would enable you to stop faffing about with equipment which is not intended to be deployed in the way that you have set it up. For example, a suitable Netgear smartswitch can be had for under £50 here in the UK ($65 across the pond), so even the most penurious organisation should be able to find enough loose change down the back of the sofa to cover the cost. You’d also get VLAN support with such a device, and although you might not have a use for VLANs now, having the facility available in the future might save you time, trouble, and money.
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Malik AbuzarAuthor Commented:
I have bought the gigabit switch manufactured by TP-Link. When I connect the cable directly to PC, link speed is 10mbps, while when connecting through switch, link speed is 1 Gbps. Where is the problem?
Internet performance remains same, as I have 6Mbps internet connection, but LAN transfers are slow and speed is same, i.e., ~1 MB/s whether connected directly or through switch.
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PerarduaadastraCommented:
If by connecting the cable directly to the PC you mean the cable from the D-Link DIR300, then the bottleneck would appear to be in the latter. If the router is supplied by your ISP and your internet speed is only 6Mbps, it may be that the router LAN interface has been configured for 10Mbps on the basis that no more than that is needed due to the slowness of the WAN connection.
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PerarduaadastraCommented:
I've just looked up the D-Link DIR-300, and its a fairly elderly piece of kit - as far as I can discover, it was EOL in November 2012. By current standards it is well and truly obsolete, as it only supports 802.11b and 802.11g wireless, and only has a 10/100Mbps switch.

I'd suggest replacing it with a current product. What you ultimately end up with will depend to some extent on how comfortable you are with the nuts and bolts of networking. If you were to ask what would be best for your situation there would be no shortage of opinions offered, but Draytek, Ubiquiti, and the Cisco RV series products come to mind. Routers are a bit like anti-virus software - people have very strongly held views on what's best and can be quite aggressive in defending their hardware of choice!

I'm assuming that you have a 6Mbps internet connection because nothing better is available to you. If there are better options you can go for then I'd seriously consider them; If you have three offices each with, say, four users then 6Mbps isn't going to go very far between them...
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Malik AbuzarAuthor Commented:
Thanks everyone for offering support. The problem was in wire. It was a cheap wire which was attenuating the link speed. I replaced the wire with cat6 and now, the link speed is 100 mbps, as provided by ADSL router.
Offices are personal offices, meant for single person only, so 6 mbps is enough for 3 workers.
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PerarduaadastraCommented:
Well, the common denominator of your problems seems to be that the cabling services were provided by the Hairy String Company. I’d check and replace every cable supplied by whoever did the installation work, even if said cables appear to be working; this should head off future trouble at the pass, so to speak.
If you paid for this cable installation, you wuz robbed...
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