Internet and network speed issues with Windows 10 Pro connected via Automatic IP/DNS configuration

Hi Experts,

I'm going to do a site visit to one of my clients this Friday afternoon to troubleshoot speed issues (mostly Internet-related) on a recently purchased and installed Windows 10 Pro box, as well as a Windows 7 Pro box. I've checked them both remotely and have been unable to resolve the issues.

I *think* the problem with the Windows 10 box is DNS related, but the only difference between it and the rest of the office machines, is that DNS settings are obtained automatically by the Windows 10 machine, while the rest of the office workstations have been configured with static IP and DNS settings (by me) some time ago.

I tried changing the DNS configuration to static settings remotely and ended up being booted out with the machine no longer able to connect to the Internet, then had the embarrassment of having to talk one of the employees through changing them back to automatic, so a site visit is now inevitable.

Both are hard-wired to the network with CAT6 cabling, both have SSD drives and ample RAM. The Windows 7 box is identical to more than a dozen other workstations in the office.

Anyone struck this before when Automatic IP configurations are being used to connect to a server, vs static IPs?

The office recently underwent an entire rewire from CAT5 to CAT6E and all Routers and Switches are GB in speed. I intend to check the cabling for both machines, but I doubt that will be the problem.

What else would you recommend checking into with such a described scenario that I may not have thought of? Any tips on configuring Window 10 Pro with Static IP/DNS? I usually just leave things with Automatically obtained settings without a problem but seems things may be different at this site.

Thanks.
LVL 25
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
as you mention above it is a speed issue hence i would believe the Windows 7 an 10 boxes are currently connected to the internet with no issues to access any resources, just not fast as you expected. correct?
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAuthor Commented:
i would believe the Windows 7 an 10 boxes are currently connected to the internet with no issues to access any resources, just not fast as you expected. correct?
Yes bbao, perfectly correct.

For example, connecting to websites may fail on the first try, yet will work on a subsequent try and performance is very slow. I know it has nothing to do with the Internet service itself, as I have had another workstation open remotely (connected to both at the same time via TeamViewer) and doing identical comparative tests at the same time without any issues.

I've tried different browsers, disabling AV, refreshing DNS via ipconfig, yet nothing seems to help. This is a fresh install of Windows 10.

The only things I can come up with is either the cabling between the problematic boxes and the switch, or DNS taking too long to resolve. I've never needed to use static settings on a Windows 10 box but I imagine it's the same deal as for Windows 7.

Just wondering if anyone had any ideas to throw out as to what tests I should do when I'm there.

Thanks for your help.
Iamthecreator OMIT Admin/EE Solution GuideCommented:
You can try resetting the TCP stack

At elevated command prompt
netsh int ip reset resetlog.txt

Open in new window

Acronis True Image 2019 just released!

Create a reliable backup. Make sure you always have dependable copies of your data so you can restore your entire system or individual files.

ArneLoviusCommented:
Perhaps the Win7 boxes have IPV6 disabled, and the W10 box does not have IPv6 disabled and has a "bad" IPv6 address which it attempts to use first...
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAuthor Commented:
Thanks, Iamthecreator and ArneLovius. I've put those on the list to test.

Anyone else?
bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
i would open three or four Command Prompt windows and keep runing PING command against the hosts to be tested. one of them is to PING the local router (the default gateway). another one is to PING the primary DNS server. the others are for the selected websites for performance test.

this way you can continuously watch the connection speed against different parts of your connection to the target hosts, it may tell you if there is any delay at network layer.

this is the first stage. let me know how it goes. thanks.
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAuthor Commented:
Thanks bbao. Good idea and added to the list.
nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
my .02 in you favorite valuta:
Are there Domain Controllers on site?
Are the automatic supplied DNS pointing to these DC's EXCLUSIVELY?   If not you would have issues.....in rechability of predominantly local resources.
The DC needs to forward all requests to the internet DNS if needed.

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAuthor Commented:
Thanks, noci. Yes there is a Windows 2003 server acting as the Domain controller and only being accessed as a File Server with WorkGroup settings. It's what hands out the IP's and DNS settings. (yes I know it's unsupported and is overdue for replacement, but $ are a consideration for the owner. I've locked it down, disabled IIS and RDP and put a ton of AV / AM / Firewall protection on it, as well as all endpoints configured with AV / AM).

Anything in particular that I should be aware of when configuring Windows 10 with a static IP/DNS?
nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
You could install a QNAP or likewise NAS as a DC+ file server....  (that should keep the price down *a lot*).
Not that i know of.. then again i have no recent windows experience...
Bill BachPresident and Btrieve GuruCommented:
When moving to GbE, there is ALWAYS the chance of substandard cabling coming into play.  Standard Cat5 is fine for 100Mbps, but it can present as very poor network performance on GbE.  When if the wiring in the walls is Cat6, if the patch cable from the wall to the PC is still Cat5 for some reason, this exact symptom can occur.

When troubleshooting networking issues, the real diagnostgic tool is Wireshark (www.wireshark.org).  This open source tool can provide insight into the network communications that are taking place.  For example, if you see a bunch of packets highlighted in black (and flagged as retransmissions or out-of-order packets), then it usually indicates a cabling issue of some sort.  On the flip side, if the problem is DNS, then you'll see the DNS requests leaving the workstation, along with the replies when they do come back.  

The way to use this is to set up your web browser to a new page (one that is not in cache), but do NOT load it yet.  Then, start the Wireshark capture, and click to load the web page.  As soon as it is loaded, stop the capture.  If you set the TIME column to "seconds since start of trace", then you'll easily be able to see when large jumps appear in the timeline, which will help identify where the problem is.  If that area is rife with "black" packets, then check the coloring rule for the packet to see why it was flagged, or look at the Expert Analysis for details.
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAuthor Commented:
When moving to GbE, there is ALWAYS the chance of substandard cabling coming into play

Agreed, but I have the report here on all connections and not one has a conditional pass. All connections passed with flying colors, but I will try it in another office socket to rule that out.

When if the wiring in the walls is Cat6, if the patch cable from the wall to the PC is still Cat5 for some reason, this exact symptom can occur.

Great thought Bill, I hadn't thought of that and have added it to my list of things to check. I configured the entire office, including the server several years ago, but I didn't install the Windows 10 box and did all my work on it remotely, so it is indeed possible a staff member grabbed an old CAT5 cable to hook it up to the network. Will be great if it turns out to be that simple :)

Wireshark capture is another troubleshooting step I hadn't considered. Thanks for your tips Bill, much appreciated.

Regards, Andrew
Radhakrishnan RSenior Technical LeadCommented:
Hi,

I suspect there could be IP conflict for the Windows 10 machines which is configured as 'Static' IP?. Instead of giving static IP, my suggestion would be reserve the IP in DHCP for that machine and leave them getting automatic from DHCP server. Another cause may be VLAN (if you have one).

Next option is 'Proxy settings" if you have proxy server for internet access and compare the working machine and problematic machines.

Good luck
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAuthor Commented:
I suspect there could be IP conflict for the Windows 10 machines which is configured as 'Static' IP?
No IP conflicts or Proxy server in use, Radhakrishnan. Thanks for the suggestions though.
joinaunionCommented:
Is it connected to a outdated switch?
At my workplace they had ones that would only do 100 mbs. Update resolved the issue.
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAuthor Commented:
Is it connected to a outdated switch?
At my workplace they had ones that would only do 100 mbs.
No, as I mentioned in my opening post, all switches, modem/router are GB speed capable. The 24 port Cisco smart switch I installed can handle 100mb on the fly, but is a GB switch so that won't be it. All connected hardware on that network is GB.
Andrew LeniartIT Consultant & Freelance JournalistAuthor Commented:
Summary of suggestions tested

  • Resetting TCP stack didn't resolve.
  • Disabling IPV6 made no difference.
  • Continuous PING tests on different workstations at the same time showed the same results.
  • Patch Cable was replaced - made no difference.
  • Network cabling between switch and workstation was tested and found to be fine.

[noci] Are there Domain Controllers on site? << This turned out to be the cause, likely due to the on-site 2003 SBS that has been heavily protected and locked down for safety. It was acting as the DNS server and not forwarding requests to the Internet when automatic DNS was selected on a workstation.

Both machines Internet performance drastically improved as soon as Static IP and DNS settings were forced. Issue resolved.

Thanks to everyone who participated and offered their ideas. Much appreciated!

Regards, Andrew
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Windows 10

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.