Can a Hard Drive connected to a Router be setup to allow backups for a Mac & Win Machines (both laptops) either to one HD or from a USB Splitter to two HD's

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I have an ASUS 3200 Router and heard that I could use it and its USB connection to make a backup location with a hard drive connected to it. I have only one USB port but two laptops I work from. One a Dell Vostro and the other a MacBook Pro. I am wondering since formatting the HD is an issue here. Can I create a partition and format one side for a Windows backup and the other for a Mac? I know it involves formatting the disk which I do know know if one can allow the other to save to or not and the location of the HD's drives. File Path.
Does anyone know if this can be done in any capacity? I also have a USB splitter that could double up the ports but do not know if that would work either with two separate HD's with two connections? Any Help Appreciated.
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David FavorFractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018

Commented:
Many routers provide this function.

Apple even makes WiFi hotspots with large disks.

And, keep in mind the speed of USB is going to be very slow. Also Wireless transmission of large files will also be slow.

So, you can do this + just be prepared for long times associated with moving data onto your WiFi USB disk devices.
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Expert of the Year 2018
Commented:
Here is a decent article about this. It basically makes a NAS at the router

https://arstechnica.com/civis/viewtopic.php?t=1238781

I share the concerns above about speed if you wish to do full backups. With only one USB port, I think you are limited to the one device for one OS.
The Router has its own OS .. so in effect you DO NOT format for Windows and OSX
Instead you format for the OS that the Router supports and then the Router will SHARE the drive using a protocol which the Windows and OSX can read/write.

In this case you'd be best to format it NTFS and then it can be shared over SAMBA (SMB with OSX)

There's no option to put in a splitter and connect 2 usb drives as the Router will only allow and recognise one drive.

Get a 1TB or larger external HD and format NTFS .. enable sharing on the Router Web interface and take if from there
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Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2016

Commented:
@David Favor - Apple does not make Airport Time Capsule products anymore, for over 2 years now ;)
Brian BEE Topic Advisor, Independant Technology Professional
Commented:
It isn't really what you asked, but if you have two hard drives, one option would be two a USB enclosure that can hold two disks and is supported by your router. Then you can set up mirroring (RAID1) so you don't lose your backups when a disk fails. In case case, you can probably still create two shares if you want, one for Mac backups and one for Windows.

More to the point, although using the USB is a quick and easy method of creating a NAS, you will probably get more options if you buy an enclosure that you can connect to the router via a network port rather than a USB port.
Then you can set up mirroring (RAID1) so you don't lose your backups when a disk fails.
That's not really what RAID1 is for.  A backup is just a copy and you should just have another copy if you're worried about data loss.  Don't rely on RAID as an extra backup, because it's not.
Brian BEE Topic Advisor, Independant Technology Professional

Commented:
Serialband I think you misunderstood...

I mean the disks in the NAS being used for backups are in RAID1. So when a drive fails in the NAS, you still have your backups.  i.e. The backup data will still exist in its current form. It is not substitute for keeping another copy of your backup somewhere else (the 321 rule).

Let's leave it at that please and not drag the question off topic. If the Author needs more information, I am happy to clarify further.
I was just clarifying that information, because I've encountered far too many people misunderstanding that fact and losing their data.  RAID is not backup.
RUA Volunteer2?Tableau Trainer & Consultant Sales Exec.

Author

Commented:
Thank you all very much really good to know this. Answer was clear and all of you helped cover bits of the question. Great stuff.
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Expert of the Year 2018

Commented:
You are very welcome and I was happy to help

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