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LockDown32Flag for United States of America

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Is TRIM or Garbage Collection in SSD/NVMe drives still a consideration in Servers?

I noticed a couple reviews with Highpoint's new M.2 NVMe RAID controller . What I noticed  was that there were testing with consumer NVMes which begs the question about what is going on with TRIM/Garbage Collection.

   Everyone was staying away from consumer SSDs in servers primarily because RAID controllers didn't support TRIM. Have they made any major improvements to TRIM or Garbage Collection?  Do any RAID controllers at this point support TRIM? or are you still limited to Enterprise SSDs/NVMes in servers for power protection and garbage collection?
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So did you see what people are recommending for VM Servers? A high end RAID controller with 1GB cache yet two SSDs in a RAID 1 configuration. RAID 1 only feeds the controller with one drive doesn't it? So a 12G controller is capable for 1200MB/sec isn't it? but a SATA SSD only gives it up at 500MB/s right? So that is kind of a waste in controller isn't?

What would you do to optimized it a little better and who's controller in what configuration would you use?
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RAID controllers do read load balancing, it's fairly trivial to send half the read requests to each device. With NVMe you have 4 PCIe lanes to each device from the controller so it is a tad faster than SATA.
I was discussing this here a year or so ago and was told RAID 1, by definition, would only read from one drive. That it would "fill the pipe" with input from both drives. Not true?
depends on the controller, I know for a fact HPE Smart Arrays do read load balancing as there is a white paper saying it doesn't work very well with sequential data on HDDs.