IT contractor released from assignment for no reason in bad faith.

Michael Gray
Michael Gray used Ask the Experts™
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I have a non technical it contracting related issue and I know this isn't really the place but maybe someone can suggest another forum. I was working for an IT contracting firm, initials are "RH", and I was release from an assignment for no reason in bad faith. Anyone know of who I would contact to negotiate a resolution? I just want to work again. That's all.

thank you
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Commented:
The problem is, IT work is paramountly BUILT around faith. If for any reason, even if unreasonably, the faith is broken, there's almost no fixing it. No contract negotiation, no years long law suit will ever get you back in the original situation.

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Commented:
You are 100% correct, I want no lawsuit. I don't want the original situation. That is over. They are the ones  who broke the faith. They are the ones who lied to me repeatedly about a potential full time job with their organization if I stayed in that position for 4 months. A future position that never existed. They also tell me they had no idea how much I was taking home per hour. That is rediculus. I applied to the job from an Indeed ad that ran for a month that included the pay rate. I no longer trust them, but then I have the contracting company who was my real employer, who was collecting 1/2 of the wages paid from the organization I supported. It's time for them to step up and make me whole, but that isn't going to happen. I'm out of work till they maybe find something else for me and they'll take half of that pay. I want to hold them accountable.

OK, I vented, but I would still like to know if I there are any ideas of State or other support organizations who can act as third parties in this situation.

thank you

Commented:
You'd need  the original ad, any document or agreement ever made (and/or signed). Then go to a low entry legal representation to evaluate the next course of action (maybe you're very much in your rights, but the costs doesn't weigh in to the possible advantages). If it seems feasable, with enough estimated gains, it will probably still land in the lower courts. Other instances (be it governmental oversight or the likes), would probably only result in a slap on the wrist, which doesn't help you in any way.
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Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software Engineer

Commented:
Contracts of this type usually are at "the pleasure of" the contracting company.  What this legalese means is that the contractor can be terminated at any time, for any reason, or no reason at all.

Kimputer is correct.  Any number of verbal representations can be made and so long as they are not on paper, it's their word against yours.  They have more, and better lawyers than you'll be able to bring to the table, and if you look at whatever contract you had it probably demands arbitration or loser-pays-winner, any disputes to be litigated on their home turf.  Neither of those are good positions to be in.

Chalk it up to experience and a lesson learned.  We've all done it once.  From now on be sure to say "I'd like that in writing, please."
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Expert of the Year 2018

Commented:
I just want to work again. That's all. …
I applied to the job from an "Indeed" ad …


So then, in agreement with the above posters, chalk it up to experience, put it behind you (you cannot likely win), and try a different agency.

Also try applying on your own to companies.

Commented:
I agree with many comments made already on this.  It seems like it will be an uphill battle and not worth it.  If you are in the United States you can try writing a letter of demand and sending it to them certified mail (signature required with return receipt).  The letter of demand would be the starting point of any legal action.  Perhaps you can send the letter and then come to a settlement,  I would not put that much time, effort, or money into it as you will likely not prevail in any litigation.  

https://www.washingtonlawhelp.org/resource/how-to-write-a-demand-letter?ref=09YXa
Top Expert 2016

Commented:
You worked from a temporary agency/employment agency that contracted out your services and where paid by them while you worked for Company A. Company A or the Agency told you that you would be offered full time employment at the end of 4 months. At the end of 1 month Company A ended their contract for services that you supplied.  How you get paid and at what rate of pay is between you and the agency and not with the contracting party. It is quite common for temporary agencies to get paid double or more than what they will pay you. The temp agency may have another position for you at another company.  Full Time employment is something that is hard to get these days as most companies will hire temp's sometimes for extended periods. You don't get the perks of a full time employee and your wages are a variable cost instead of a fixed cost and have some tax advantages. As the temporary contractor you have no recourse except to register with other agencies while you wait the interview for a full time job.
All true comments. I know that the solution is to learn and move on to the next opportunity.

thank you all

Author

Commented:
Update on my situation:
It's been about 5 weeks since i was released from my contract job. I just checked online and the permanent job that i was told I would get from the workplace is now being advertised. I've applied for that job. Do you have any idea how long I would need to be separated from my contract so that the employer could hire me directly without paying a buyout to the contracting firm? Just a guess.

Thank you for your help
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Expert of the Year 2018

Commented:
If they did not give you a buyou or suggest a buyout, I think you could apply any time now.

You would have to ask the contracting company to be certain.

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