rpm command basics

I have executed the following command on a red hat Linux server
rpm -qa --last 

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to try and determine when the latest updates/patches were applied to the server. I ran this under the context of a non root account but still got some output.

A couple of questions:
--will the output of this command be full/accurate if it was executed under the context of a none root account.
---Secondly, how often are updates issued for red hat Linux, and are they cumulative / is it similar to Microsoft patch releases, and do the updates also cover security vulnerabilities. The last updates listed in the output of command were 2017 which raises some concerns that security bugs have not been patched, and therefore the server is vulnerable.
----Finally, does red hat Linux have a support lifecycle where they only continue to issue patches for certain versions, and if so where can I see where the version currently operated sits in this support lifecycle, e.g. is it still eligible for updates for new bugs/vulnerabilities.
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pma111Asked:
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Scott SilvaNetwork AdministratorCommented:
How long Redhat is supported is dependent on what version you have, And I believe updates are part of paid support... If you haven't paid, you get no updates. This is why CentOS is popular with people that prefer RedHat's distribution... Almost all the bells and whistles of RedHat, but free updates...
David FavorLinux/LXD/WordPress/Hosting SavantCommented:
1) --will the output of this command be full/accurate if it was executed under the context of a none root account.

If you get any output, then it's full/correct output.

Normally any user can see installed packages + only root user can install/update packages.

2) ---Secondly, how often are updates issued for red hat Linux, and are they cumulative / is it similar to Microsoft patch releases, and do the updates also cover security vulnerabilities. The last updates listed in the output of command were

This is a loaded question + depends a great deal on how your original RedHat installation was done.

Also as Scott said, if you're really using RedHat (not Fedora/CentOS), then you must renew your paid subscription for all updates.

Normally if your subscription is paid, installing all updates may install a sequence of updates or one cumulative update. This will vary from package to package. The net result is you'll have fairly up to date software after installing all updates.

Note: With RedHat, you'll never have latest software versions like running Debian/Ubuntu, as RedHat philosophy for Kernel + software updates is completely different.

3) ----Finally, does red hat Linux have a support lifecycle where they only continue to issue patches for certain versions, and if so where can I see where the version currently operated sits in this support lifecycle, e.g. is it still eligible for updates for new bugs/vulnerabilities.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux provides a handy EOL (end of life) graph.

You are correct. All Linux Distros eventually EOL + no updates are ever produced again.

Same for all software. For example, Apache-2.2 + PHP-5.6 are both EOL now.

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