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Firewire to USB capture device.

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Last Modified: 2019-05-28
Does anyone know where I can find a good Firewire to USB capture device?  I am in the process of copying the tapes from my Canon Elura 100 handy cam to my computer and my computer does not have a firewire port.  I also need a good software editing program once I get the videos to my computer.
Thanks in advance.
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dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.
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Commented:
Appears to be standard AVI format so any modern video editor should work.  I'm trying Shotcut  https://shotcut.org/  at present.  It's free and might be all you want.

Now as for the Firewire -- USB capture device.  I can't answer that.  I bought a PCI firewire card and plugged it into my computer and capture into that with no problems.  Google is in two minds if there are devices that do what you want.  I'll let others answer.
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They do exist, but aren't ideal.  While Firewire is technically slower than USB 2.0, it does not have to share the path, so firewire can actually overwhelm USB 2.  It has to be on its own channel, or it's not going to work at all, because firewire speeds will overwhelm USB 2.  It's best to get a firewire PCI card.  The USB to FIrewire is only going to be good for slower transfers of data.  It won't work well for video transfer.  You'll also need device drivers.  It's probably best to bring out an older computer with firewire built-in for this, rather than trying to shoehorn this into place.

https://www.amazon.com/firewire-usb/s?k=firewire+to+usb
https://www.amazon.com/Firewire-IEEE-Female-Adaptor-Converter/dp/B018108GTW/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=firewire+to+usb&qid=1557545357&s=gateway&sr=8-5

USB 2.0 supports 480 Mbps burst speeds, meaning a short term maximum, but usually, it will be much slower, depending on the types of devices on the channel.

Firewire supports 400Mbps speeds, while technically 80Mbps slower than USB 2.0, it maintained throughput speeds better.  Hence Firewire disks were always transferring data faster even when daisy chained.  USB multiplexed the channel when you had multiple devices, so the speeds were usually 480Mbps divided by the number of devices on the channel, even if the other device was not doing much.  If you have your USB mouse and keyboard on the same channel, expect the disk transfer burst speed to be 160Mbps, because USB splits the channel up equally between the 3 devices as you access them.
Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software Engineer
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dbrunton and serialband are correct, according to my past experiences with video and Firewire.  Trying to shove Firewire bandwidth down USB is sooner-or-later unreliable when video is involved and packets will be dropped.  This is not a problem on cameras that use solid state memory where retrying is possible, but it can cause major problems when the video source is a camera that uses tape.

Per the above comments, an inexpensive PCI or PCIe Firewire card is a better solution.  They run less than $6 on the fleabay, and that is from US sellers so there is no one month wait.

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=pci+firewire&_sop=15&_blrs=recall_filtering

Also check the back of your motherboard.  Intel motherboards often have Firewire ports.  So do some Dells.

Side note:  When the video source is a tape camera, the system must be able to accept and store the video at the camera's speed, not at its own convenience.  A second disk drive is a necessity when pulling video off tape cameras.  Windows or other applications cannot be causing seeks all over the drive while video is coming in.
dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.
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Commented:
I use either WinDV or DVIO to capture from my tape camera using the firewire PCI card.  (it's a Windows system).  Both are free utils and I think I got them from videohelp.com

You shouldn't have any trouble downloading from the camera using these as long as you aren't doing anything else with the computer at the time.
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why not take the SD card out, and read it on a pc ? -  you can copy it then
Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software Engineer
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Commented:
No SD card.  The Elura 100 is an analog oldie that used mini-DV tape.
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i checked the specs, it says SD card    https://www.cnet.com/products/canon-elura-100/specs/
if there is no sd card installed, buy one, and copy the files over to it
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You usually can't just transfer from the tape to the SD Card or vice versa on those older models.  The cameras had to transfer to a computer through the firewire ports.  The SD card was just an alternate, and more expensive medium to the tapes.  The devices weren't designed to transfer between the two.  You transferred to the computer only through FIrewire.

These days, SD Cards are plenty cheap, but that wasn't the case before.  Those early SD cards were quite expensive and the cameras didn't even support larger capacity.  Disks were also quite expensive as storage.  You needed to spend much more money to save that data to disks.  Home users just used tape, because they were much, much cheaper, and stored more video, back then.
dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.
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Commented:
You can transfer to the SD card according to the manual.

I'm not sure what the maximum size of the card it will take though.
Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software Engineer
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I checked the specs at the Canon site instead of cnet (nudge nudge wink wink), and Canon says mini-DV tape.

https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/products/details/camcorders/support-minidv-camcorders/elura-100/elura-100

"Tape Format:  Video cassettes bearing the DV mark
Maximum recording Time:  SP: 80 min., LP: 120 min. (80 min. cassette)"
dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.
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Commented:
The manual is here  http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/1/0900000641/01/ELURA100IM-EN.pdf

I suggest having a read and doing a search on card  ...
Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software Engineer
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Commented:
I did have a read.

The Elura100 uses tape.
Shall we agree that it can use either one?
dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.
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Commented:
Agreed.
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also - if you cannot transfer the video to an SD card, what would be it's use?? makes no sense to me
here they sell  the cards : 128MB up to 1GB  https://www.offtek.co.uk/canon/camcorder-memory-upgrades/canon-elura-100-memory

Author

Commented:
thanks to all for the help to my problem. If anyone can provide me with instructions on how to transfer the Elura 100 tape to the camera SD card it would be greatly appreciated.
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i looked at the manual :  http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/5/0900000605/01/DVSDV20WN-EN.pdf
it seems you can export only still files to the SD card page 67
so sorry for the misleading info i gave
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Commented:
Older models just never had the capability.  It would cost much more if it was available and probably needed additional circuitry.  You were mainly transferring through the DV (firewire) cable.  Older than that, you transferred through S-Video or composite to a VCR, or even use a VHS-C caddy in you VHS deck to copy to another VHS deck.  

Copying video was done differently back then.  Computers did not have enough RAM or storage to managed video early on and were mainly used as controllers first.  It's only really when video went fully digital that we can now store or transfer data onto computers.  There wasn't really the storage capacity and the cost was too high prior to around 10 years ago.

Get the firewire card.  It's cheap enough.  If you happen to have 2 cameras, you could transfer from one to the other to save to the SD Card and not have to buy extra parts.

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