Question regarding Microsoft server and terminal server licenses (CAL licence)

LIBRALEX
LIBRALEX used Ask the Experts™
on
Question regarding Microsoft server / terminal server licences (CAL licences).

We would like to host a terminal server setup on a dedicated server, and would like to know what exactly to look for in terms of licencing.  We would like to have separate practices (with their own virtual server with a dedicated sql server to them) and a few users to be able to access their server. Our program will be on the terminal server connection, so each user will connect via remote desktop.

We could be looking at up to 8 practices with 50 users.

Which server and which license should we be looking at, as this is new territory for us.

Being Windows partners, do we get any discount or services cheaper?
Comment
Watch Question

Do more with

Expert Office
EXPERT OFFICE® is a registered trademark of EXPERTS EXCHANGE®
Adam BrownSenior Systems Admin
Top Expert 2010

Commented:
I would recommend getting Server 2019 Licenses and CALs. They are downgradeable, meaning you can license a 2016 server with the 2019 keys and the CALs can be used on any Remote Desktop Server below 2019.

Being Windows partners, do we get any discount or services cheaper?

Unfortunately, we can't answer that question. Microsoft partners can get discounts and special terms, but they depend on what level of partner you are and a number of other factors. You'll need to talk to a MS rep to determine what you qualify for.
Lead SaaS Infrastructure Engineer
Commented:
I'm going to answer this a little out of order for good reason.


Being Windows partners, do we get any discount or services cheaper?

If you are going to go for internal licensing, through Open Licensing or Select Licensing agreements with Microsoft, then Depending on your Microsoft Partnership level (Gold/Silver) there used to be some basic discount (Not sure anymore, it's been like 10 years since I looked at those licensing levels).

They would be shown right on your partner login page.

  If I recall the major discount was for MSDN Licenses, which you also get some for free being an MS Partner) And you can not use those to run production equipment, they're for devs.

Volume Licensing, and SPLA Licensing are much less expansive alternatives to Open and Select licensing and don;t (or at least didn't) get any special discounts for being a partner other than what you negotiate with yoru MS Sales Rep if you make that a point of value to the proposition.

  Generally Volume Licenses used to require going through a whole contracting process with MS and getting pricing and negotiating terms a little with them to try and sweeten the deal, but honestly even the base values they quote will be preferable to other options.

  SPLA Licensing on the other hand is administered through 3rd party Vendors (take you pick, CDW, insight, HP, Dell, they can all be yoru SPLA Licensing Partner so long as they're in the program.).

  While SPLA offers set costs of r licenses and they are not negotiable, but the base costs are on par with or better than Volume licensing when you factor in Software Assurance.

 The only Catch is that for SPLA Licensing you have to meet certain requirements (You Meet those requirements based on the description given for your needs) and you have to report your license use to your licensing partner monthly so you can pay a monthly fee for the licenses you use.


We could be looking at up to 8 practices with 50 users.

It sound like you are going to start out "small" and ramp up over time, adding more servers and users as you add each practice and adding or removing servers ad users from a given setup as they gain/lose workers.

This is a prime fit for SPLA Licensing.

Which server and which license should we be looking at, as this is new territory for us.

Windows Server 2019 Per CPU Licenses, and Windows Terminal Server  SALs  (or per CPU  if available) Licenses.

If you are running VMs you only need to buy a Windows 2019 Enterprise License for each physical Server's CPUs to cover as many VMs as you like.

With SPLA (Service Provider License Agreement" you would just note your physical CPU count for all of the VMWare/HyperV/Citrix servers which are running the Vms for these accounts and that's all you pay regardless of how many VMs you spin up.

 For the Terminal server Side if they are per CPU then you count h e virtual CPUs of the individual VMs, or if they are Per User (SALs) then you count the number of users able to connect.  (If you have both options, you do a cost benefit analysis (divide the cost of the CPUs for the server by the cost of User licenses for the server, to get a # of users you want to be less than if you use the User licenses before switching to CPU licenses.
Ben Personick (Previously QCubed)Lead SaaS Infrastructure Engineer

Commented:
Any Questions?

Author

Commented:
Thank you for the detailed answer.
Ben Personick (Previously QCubed)Lead SaaS Infrastructure Engineer

Commented:
You're welcome!  :)Glad to help!  :)

Do more with

Expert Office
Submit tech questions to Ask the Experts™ at any time to receive solutions, advice, and new ideas from leading industry professionals.

Start 7-Day Free Trial