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Do I need to create a separate partition for the Data drive when using a virtual machine

Chopper2302
Chopper2302 asked
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Hey all,

I am thinking of creating a virtual machine for one of my clients using Hyper-V. It will be a terminal server environment where they will be using a cetralised database and accessing emails and docs. Their documents folder is only around 50GB and they have been getting away with 240GB up until now but I will increase a little when I build it. My question: Is there a need to partition the OS from the data drive.. will this provide any increase in performance or reliability?

FYI We will be running SSD drives with 32GB RAM, 8 vCPU cores which I think is ample.

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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017

Commented:
It's not compulsory, but it's up to you have you create servers.

Also DO NOT create partitions, but create individual virtual disks per volume (or drive letter).

e.g.

virtual disk 1 = C:
virtual disk 2 = D:

It makes it much easier in the future for expanding the disks.

Partitions are legacy of the old days, when we could only have 32MB partitions under DOS.

Author

Commented:
Thanks for the reply.

Sorry, I worded that wrong and have had a big day. Yes, have created plenty of servers but not for Server 2016 yet. Usually, I create virtual disk

C:Drive for OS
D:Drive for Data

Will it increase performance though or is better for NTFS permissions.

One side question, how much space you would allow for VDisk 1 for Server 2016

TIA
VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017
Commented:
If both virtual disks are on the same "volume" on the Host - the performance will be the same.

With two virtual disks, a small margin of improvement, but not detectable.

Easier to manage should you want to expand C: and D:

40-80GB but you can always grow it..
Peter HutchisonSenior Network Systems Specialist

Commented:
For Drive C, I would allocate at least 100GB, that would cover the OS, applications and any updates that will accumulate over the months/years.

Author

Commented:
OK, sweet thank you guys ;)

Author

Commented:
Thanks again
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017

Commented:
no problems.
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/Storage

Commented:
I have two very thorough EE articles on all things Hyper-V:

Some Hyper-V Hardware and Software Best Practices
Practical Hyper-V Performance Expectations