Need to convert Quicktime Movie to compact, autoplaying, looping file for posting on website

computerlarry
computerlarry used Ask the Experts™
on
I have a Quicktime .MOV file that I would like to convert into a autoplaying, looping file of some sort that I could then place on a website.

It is an animation, with just a few graphic images moving.

I need it to very very compact.  A similar Shockwave Flash file was 140k

Thanks.
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Hi,

you can convert it to gif
https://cloudconvert.com/mov-to-gif

 or if you have a budget you can use this video converter https://videoconverter.wondershare.net/
or use Filmora https://filmora.wondershare.net/video-editor/

Wondershare have very great and affortable softwares, I use this from a few years and I'm very happy with
Michael ElliottHelpDesk Technician

Commented:
Like lenamtl has suggested, there are several online converters that will probably do the trick.

I personally prefer https://ezgif.com/video-to-gif because it seems to keep file size on the lower end and offers quite a few editing solutions.
David FavorFractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018

Commented:
As lenamtl suggested, creating an animated GIF or PNG will be best.

Currently autoplay videos are only allowed in browsers, if the video is muted.

Future browser versions will almost surely completely block all forms of autoplay, so animated images will be your best approach.

To convert your movie to a animated image only once, using an online tool will likely suffice.

If you have many animated images to generate, likely a better approach will be to build or install ffmpeg + generate your own animated image on the command line.

Using ffmpeg also allows you complete control over all aspects of the image rendering process, which may be required also.

No way to guess, without a copy of your footage to analyze.
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Author

Commented:
I used Quicktime capture on a Mac, and found a site that converted to autoplaying GIF.  The GIF is 3 MB in size.  I tried a few online GIF compressors, but they don't save much more than 10%. I tried resizing to 50% (to then be enlarged by the server) but that didn't save enough either.  I have Adobe Animate, but that won't accept GIF or MOV.  Is there anything that will super-compress?
Fractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018
Commented:
1) I used Quicktime capture on a Mac, and found a site that converted to autoplaying GIF.  The GIF is 3 MB in size.

Or you can do this yourself using ffmpeg. Google various recipes for how to use ffmpeg to create animated GIF or PNG images.

2) I tried a few online GIF compressors, but they don't save much more than 10%.

Unlikely you'll ever be able to shrink GIF files very much, without destroying all quality.

3) I tried resizing to 50% (to then be enlarged by the server) but that didn't save enough either.

No "server" will ever change an image files size or video file size.

Depending on the exact HTML markup you use, browsers may resize files... so browsers may resize + servers will never resize, unless you write a large amount of code running in some language, like PHP, to accomplish some sort of resizing logic.

4) I have Adobe Animate, but that won't accept GIF or MOV.

Adobe Animate == Wrong tool for this job. Always use the correct tool for the job.

You'll either use ffmpeg yourself + have 100% control over output.

Or you'll use some site/tool which likely uses ffmpeg libraries behind the scenes + have near 0% control over output.

5) Is there anything that will super-compress?

You're likely thinking incorrectly about compression here, because this is a multi-stage process consisting of...

a) Break video into a set of GIF or PNG files. One file per video frame.

b) Run your compression across all files produced in step #a.

c) Stitch together your single frame files into an animated image.

Likely you're thinking you can somehow do compression on #c, which is incorrect... well... if you'd like to preserve original quality.

Compression can only be done as defined in #b, for best quality. Also very important, when compressing images in the #b step, you must use the same tool + compression algorithm across all images... especially if you're reducing number of colors used, else your final image will look grainy or contain other artifacts causing the images to appear very low resolution.

Tip: What you're doing is part art + part science, so experimentation is required to come up with a recipe to accomplish this + produce a final animated image which approximates quality of the original video.
Hi,

Unfortunately GIF are often huge file
So you will need to decide between small video file that will probably not autoplay or using a big file animation gif?

I don't know the reason for the autoplay....

But I would use cloud like Youtube / Vimeo because it save bandwidth and space and play ok in any browser

If you want to host your videos then use HTML5
 - don't forget to add a poster so user can see at least an image and different video format for browser compatibility.

example from https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/video
<!-- Using multiple sources as fallbacks for a video tag -->
<!-- 'Elephants Dream' by Orange Open Movie Project Studio, licensed under CC-3.0, hosted by archive.org -->
<!-- Poster hosted by Wikimedia -->
<video width="620" controls
  poster="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e8/Elephants_Dream_s5_both.jpg" >
  <source
    src="https://archive.org/download/ElephantsDream/ed_1024_512kb.mp4"
    type="video/mp4">
  <source
    src="https://archive.org/download/ElephantsDream/ed_hd.ogv"
    type="video/ogg">
  <source
    src="https://archive.org/download/ElephantsDream/ed_hd.avi"
    type="video/avi">
  Your browser doesn't support HTML5 video tag.
</video>

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You can convert video to a lightweight formats such as VP9 and H.265

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