file size descrepencies

Ryan
Ryan used Ask the Experts™
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I'm having a strange problem with the size of some files after I copy them.  Below you will find the properties windows for 2 different files in 2 different places.  I have done the following:
1. Copy the file using PowerShell (overwrites the old copy)
2. Deleted the old copy on drive E and then copy the file using PowerShell (creates a new file)
3. Copy the file using PowerDesk 6 (overwrites the old copy)
4. Deleted the old copy on drive E and then copy the file using PowerDesk 6

All four result in the same thing happening:  The new copied file to the external hard drive (drive E) is larger in physical size than the original.

I also checked the file size using PowerDesk 6 on the other external hard drive (drive F) and it is an EXACT DUPLICATE of the oringal.

Drive E is attaced to my Linksys router and Drive F is connected directly to my desktop.  Both drives are the exact same make and model (Seagate).

Does this possibley have something to do with the fact that drive E is a network drive?

properties.jpgproperties-2.jpg
Seems like I am burning up disk space on drive E.
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AlanConsultant

Commented:
The drive that is called 'E' must have a sector size of 1024 kB, which is therefore the smallest space that a single file can occupy.

You can't have two files in one sector.

Alan.

Author

Commented:
Alan:

If you look closely at the properties images you should notice that both are comparing drive C to drive E.  So the next question is how can I fix this and still use drive E as a network drive?

Ryan
Denver, CO
AlanConsultant

Commented:
It is already a network drive, mapped as 'E'?

The issue is not a problem, just a manifestation of the disk geometry of the drive that you are using.

Alan.
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Author

Commented:
Alan:
It is already a network drive, mapped as 'E'?
That is correct.

I have checked a few other files on drive C and compared them to drive E and they are having the same problem.

It's a problem because if multiple files are doing the same thing then I am wasting a lot of disk space and the External hard drives are getting full.  Drive F is not a network hard drive and does not have this problem.

Author

Commented:
Unfortunately I do not have the money at this time to simply buy 2 bigger external hard drives.
Consultant
Commented:
Hi Ryan,

It is not a problem (in the sense of being a fault) - it is just the way that drives work.

A single sector can only contain one file (or part thereof), so small files on larger drives (with larger sector sizes) still take up a single sector.

There is nothing you can do - it is related to the physical geometry of the drive.

One option would be to archive many small files into a single 'archive' (such as a zip file).  That single zip file would then fill up multiple sectors, and the wastage would be limited to, at most, a single sector for the end of the (single) zip file.


Does that help?

Alan.

Author

Commented:
Thanks Alan

Author

Commented:
Why is the file size on drive E (network drive) differ from drive F?
AlanConsultant

Commented:
Interesting.

You could check the sector size of each drive, maybe they differ?

Author

Commented:
how do I check the sector size?
AlanConsultant
Commented:
On the machine that the drive is attached to (not one it is a mapped drive) open a command prompt with admin rights, then:

fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo X:

Replace 'X' with the actual drive letter.

Author

Commented:
how do I check the sector size on drive E (the mapped drive)?
AlanConsultant

Commented:
Hi Ryan,

Did the above not work?  What response did you get to the command?

You should get an output something like this:

NTFS Volume Serial Number :        0x94a4dbefa4dbd23a
NTFS Version   :                   3.1
LFS Version    :                   2.0
Number Sectors :                   0x0000000006002c4e
Total Clusters :                   0x0000000000c00589
Free Clusters  :                   0x000000000035c9fb
Total Reserved :                   0x000000000000cc07
Bytes Per Sector  :                512
Bytes Per Physical Sector :        512
Bytes Per Cluster :                4096
Bytes Per FileRecord Segment    :  1024
Clusters Per FileRecord Segment :  0
Mft Valid Data Length :            0x0000000017fc0000
Mft Start Lcn  :                   0x00000000000c0000
Mft2 Start Lcn :                   0x0000000000000002
Mft Zone Start :                   0x0000000000a7be00
Mft Zone End   :                   0x0000000000a81080
Max Device Trim Extent Count :     512
Max Device Trim Byte Count :       0xffffffff
Max Volume Trim Extent Count :     62
Max Volume Trim Byte Count :       0x40000000
Resource Manager Identifier :      CA8C193A-AF56-11E5-AA02-C6856192999E

For example, on this drive, the physical sector size is 512 Bytes and the cluster size is 4096 Bytes.

Thanks,

Alan.

Author

Commented:
This is what I got from cmd prompt:

C:\Users\username>fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo E:
A local NTFS volume is required for this operation.

I replaced my username with "username"

Sorry, I didn't see you note that the drive is not a networked drive and drive E is in fact a network drive.  Does that make the files bigger on drive E?
AlanConsultant

Commented:
Hi Ryan,

To run the above command, you need to be on the machine to which the drive is actually (physically) connected.  It won't work from a machine that is just mapped to the drive.

Your 'E' drive is mapped to a physical disk (or a volume on a physical disk) somewhere.  That disk is plugged in (by some means) to a computer - that is the computer on which you need to run the above command (assuming that the computer is running Windows of course).  If, for example, it is running Linux (say) then the command will be different.

Does that make sense?

Thanks,

Alan.

Author

Commented:
I understand.  The issue has been resolved.

Thank you,
Ryan
Denver, CO

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