check the type of lan cable remotely

Ding QB
Ding QB used Ask the Experts™
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hi,
is there any method to remote check the type of lan cable plugging,  from network card device properties / other windows log?
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ste5anSenior Developer

Commented:
No. I'm not aware of any method to detect the plugging.

There were some things possible with low-level programming of some NIC's and to guess the cable type. But the used plugging is not really covered by this.
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Expert of the Year 2018
Commented:
No, you cannot do that. You need to physically identify the cable.
Principal Software Engineer
Commented:
In some cases a guess can be made, e.g. "I know this system is 1500 feet away from the switch and it has gigabit speed, so it must have fiber in there somewhere."  But the rest of the time it's not possible to know.  As an example - for a two meter cable at 10 Mbps, Cat3 is just as good as Cat6e and it is probably also just as good at 100 Mbps.  The only distinction that can be reliably drawn without a premises visit is WiFi vs. wired.
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Distinguished Expert 2018
Commented:
Long story short, no. You could try to guess based on connection speed (1 Gbps, etc.), but that's by no means a sure thing as several types of cabling can accomplish the same speeds.
Top Expert 2013
Commented:
>>""I know this system is 1500 feet away from the switch and it has gigabit speed, so it must have fiber in there somewhere."
Correct.  Copper has a limit of 328'.  Even with a Fluke cable analyzer you cannot determine the type of copper unless you are referring to straight through or cross over. If you have managed switches you should be able to tell if Copper or Fibre as it will show the port type.
Commented:
Not sure where the 1500 feet came into this question, but if you are talking about a normal Ethernet run, all you can do is guess.  If the connection is 10 or 100, it could be any cable.  If the the connection is gigabit, then it has to be cat5e, cat6 or better.
Top Expert 2013
Commented:
Gigabit will run on CAT5 though not recommended, but if poorly terminated or run incorrectly (near EMI) it will drastically affect performance.  The only difference between CAT5, CAT5E, CAT6, CAT7 is the quality of the cable and connectors to reduce signal loss, cross talk, etc.
atlas_shudderedSr. Network Engineer
Commented:
Depending on the type of network equipment you are running, you may be able to determine the base media type (copper, MM/SM fiber, TWX, etc.).  To get more specific than this (is it Cat5, e, 6, etc. in the case of copper) is a physical inspect only.
Robert RComputer Service Technician
Commented:
I believe the number of twists per inch gives you a better quality cable. ie cat 5e will have less twists per inch compared to cat 6 or higher.  If it is cable that is plugged from the computer to the wall you can ask the user to read off the cat level of the wire, but then that is still a physical check. To check the type of run could be a little tricker, or you go to the server room to read off the cat number off the cable.

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