Boot problems on iMac after SSD upgrade

c7c4c7
c7c4c7 used Ask the Experts™
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Cloned, using disk utility, the old 250 GB hd to new 500 GB Samsung 860 ssd.  Tested the clone by booting from it while it was attached via USB.  It booted up, everything worked.

Physically replaced the drive in the computer, it comes on, chimes, screen flashes briefly and turns back off.

Replaced old drive machine boots successfully
The operating system version is Mavericks

Any ideas?
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noxchoIT Product Manager
Top Expert 2009

Commented:
Clone it again (btw which software did you use?) and instead of testing while connected via USB - replace the smaller drive and try to boot from new one directly.
David FavorFractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018

Commented:
Note: Many times this won't work, as Apple installs modified hardware on their drives, so for most recent machines installing any OEM drive will fail.

Fix: You can attach an external large drive. Install to external. Boot this drive. USB 3.1 is a bit clunky + slow. Thunderbird 2 or 3 works acceptably fast.

Author

Commented:
I cloned it using disk utility, which is part of the OS.

At boot hold down the option key, use disk utility to clone it

Testing using a usb mounted drive is much easier than taking the machine apart to install the drive.
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Author

Commented:
What does the symptoms  I’m getting indicate.  I am having a hard time believing that I am the only person that has upgrades the hard drive on a MAC.

 If you can’t do that it’s a serious flaw in the product
IT Product Manager
Top Expert 2009
Commented:
I would try cloning it using SuperDuper or Paragon Hard Disk Manager for Mac. Usually inbuilt tools are not very smart in such operations.

Author

Commented:
Paragon Hard Disk Manager for Mac doesn't seem to support Mavericks so I am concentrating on SuperDuper.
1st thing is the version for Mavericks seems to be fully functional for free, true?
2nd
I want to make sure that I'm going to get what I expect from "Cloning" the hard drive.  I expect to be able to do a full backup, take the old hard drive out, hook up the new larger SSD and at that point, I'm done.  The reason I'm asking that question is that the documentation talks about booting from the Full Backup and then restoring, if I cannot boot from the backup drive and use it as my new OS drive then I should not back up to the new SSD.

Comments?
noxchoIT Product Manager
Top Expert 2009

Commented:
According to the vids I’ve seen yes, the trial version is capable of cloning the drive.
By cloning all files it takes full copy of everything so the drive must be bootable.
In the old days, you had to Bless the boot disk partition to make it bootable.  The reason it worked as an external disk was because the original disk was still in place as the blessed disk.  It was booting from the blessed partition and then selecting the boot disk you set as the startup.  Cloning just copies the data, but does not bless the partition.

Boot into the original disk with the new disk as the external disk.  Mount the external disk.  It should show up as /Volumes/Macintosh HD or possibly /Volumes/Macintosh HD 1.

sudo bless /Volumes/Macintosh HD 1

Now that the external boot partition has been blessed, swap the disks. and it should boot when it's an internal disk.


If that doesn't work, it would be easier to put the new drive in the system, then Boot into recovery mode and reinstall the OS onto the disk.  This should refresh the OS and allow it to boot.

If that still doesn't work, erase the disk and reinstall over the internet and then use Migration assistant to copy the data and settings over.

Author

Commented:
Worked much better with SuperDuper then boot, swap the drives.  At boot it takes a bit of time to find the drive and boot from it.  Then System Preferences and select the new drive as the startup drive in the Startup Disk preference pane.

All Done

Thanks for the help
noxchoIT Product Manager
Top Expert 2009

Commented:
Thanks for feedback and take care.
Nox

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