Could you give me an in general overall topics on what would be your recommendation for publishing / hosting a portal (similar that) to go into production?

Eduardo Fuerte
Eduardo Fuerte used Ask the Experts™
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Hi Experts

Could you give me an in general overall topics on what would be your recommendation for publishing / hosting a portal (similar that) to go into production?

A similar site


Thanks in advance.
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NoahHardware Tester and Debugger

Commented:
Hi there! :)

I think one thing is to be using secure services while still maintaining a fast server, lots of interface mapping services and internet information services.
Fractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018
Commented:
I'm with Noah.

Your primary consideration is speed of content rendering for visitors.

Fairly simple.

1) Use solid provisioning (not hosting) from a company like OVH.

2) Use latest stable tech for your site - HTTP2 + HTTPS (HSTS + OSCP Stapling + TLSv1.2 or above) + Brotli compression.

3) Keep all OS level updates installed (for speed + security).

4) Sites like this will likely call many APIs to acquire data, so ensure high speed caching of API data, so no content rendering ever blocks for an API call.

5) Use competent site developers. You know you have someone good if their hourly rate makes you weep.

Note: #4 will be self evident to any competent developer.

And, unfortunately, the primary speed problem I've found in sites like this is the use of incompetent developers who involve API calls in page rendering.

This might be API calls to get data or worst, an API call to pass opt-in data through some external CRM system to record the opt-in.

Remember: Anytime you use any type of 3rd party callout inline with any type of action, you loose 100% control of the action.

Meaning, if the 3rd party site is slow, glitchy, down... then your site speed + stability becomes the aggregate/combination of all 3rd party callouts.

Smart developers write code using zero 3rd party callouts. Period. Ever. No exception.

3rd party callouts are fine to make in background... asynchronously... far away from any content rendering, marketing flow, money process.
Eduardo FuerteDeveloper and Analyst

Author

Commented:
Hi

Thank you for replies.

David

Another very complete reply! still studying it.

By this

1) Use solid provisioning (not hosting) from a company like OVH.
An dedicated host, ok?
Is OVH Cloud a superior solution to use when compared with AWS f.e.? If so, on what aspects.
David FavorFractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018

Commented:
You asked, "Any dedicated host ok?"

I've used many hosting + provisioning companies, start in 1994.

OVH towers over other companies for many reasons.

1) Flat rate $3/IP setup with no monthly per IP charge.

2) Unlimited bandwidth.

3) Built in dashboard recovery system, which is worth it's weight in gold. Most companies require opening a support ticket to connect a terminal server. With OVH, the recovery boot + real boot is built in dashboard.

4) Reverse DNS PTR record management. With most companies, same as #3, a ticket is required... then some long period of time... before PTR records are working. With OVH, you can allocate a new block of IPs, they show up in a few minutes, then you can set PTR records instantly, so you can have working PTR IP blocks in minutes rather than days.

5) Best of all. OVH products are normally faster iron (hardware) + cheaper (by far) of any other comparable company.

6) OVH now also provides mass disk storage servers, so running online RAID systems (with many Terrabytes of data) is dirt cheap + can be running in a few minutes after an order is input.

Geez... OVH should pay me for marketing them... :)
David FavorFractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018

Commented:
OVH compared with AWS.

1) No comparison.

2) OVH is much cheaper.

3) With OVH you never get surprise bills. With AWS $10K+ surprise bills are common, as AWS charges for everything... upload bandwidth... download bandwidth... per object access...

The worst source of surprise bills generally come from per object access, where some... marginally intelligent developer unfamiliar with AWS billing writes some code... that works... then the code is deployed with 1000s of users, which generates some per object access pattern producing the dreaded $10K+ surprise bill.

Note: You can search EE for AWS surprise bills for conversations about this sad tale.
David FavorFractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018

Commented:
[ ... soap box mode on ... ]

Tip: Cloud... the term is meaningless. Servers are servers. Hardware is hardware.

My tendency is to avoid any service mentioning the word Cloud because this is generally code for - slower + more expensive than just using a dedicated server.

[ ... soap box mode off ... ]
Eduardo FuerteDeveloper and Analyst

Author

Commented:
I just say
An dedicated host, ok?
 not  
Any dedicated host, ok?
 (no edition)
Eduardo FuerteDeveloper and Analyst

Author

Commented:
Thank you for so complete reply!
David FavorFractional CTO
Distinguished Expert 2018

Commented:
You're welcome!

Good luck!

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