Hardwired computer can't talk to wireless printers

peispud
peispud used Ask the Experts™
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Hi

My telecom router is wired to a managed switch.  I have disabled the radio on the telecom router.

One output of the switch goes to a linksys tri band velop mesh network (2 nodes).     Apparently, in a wired configuration, the wireless nodes need to be daisy chained.

Currently, my desktop computer is on another port of that  same switch.

I have regular printer & label printer who connect to the wireless network.
My computer does not have a wireless capabilities.

What is the solution.  
1)  Should I simply buy a wireless card for my desktop computer?
2)  Should I daisy chain the 1) Telecom gateway --->  Linksys Node 1 --> Linksys Node 2 --> Managed switch  ......... and then all wired devices connected to the switch?
3)  Something else?

Thank you for your time.
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Making lots of assumptions for quick response:
1) Should I simply buy a wireless card for my desktop computer?
No.  Not unless you want to put the computer somewhere that isn't conveniently wired.  Wired is always best.
2)  Should I daisy chain the 1) Telecom gateway --->  Linksys Node 1 --> Linksys Node 2 --> Managed switch  ......... and then all wired devices connected to the switch?
I've not seen any diagrams that have the Linksys nodes actually wired together although I did read that you *can*.  It appears that they form the mesh wirelessly.  
But the primary node appears to act as a router with NAT.
So maybe you would do this:
1) Telecom gateway --->  Linksys Node 1 (with NAT) --> Managed switch  ......... and then all wired devices connected to the switch.
                                                                                            .~. Linksys nodes via wireless
Or, if in bridge mode:
1) Telecom gateway --->  Managed switch -->Linksys Node 1 (no NAT) .~. Linksys Nodes via wireless
                                                                           .........all wired devices connected to the switch.
Then all the additional Linksys nodes would be wireless and/or wired to the switch or Node 1 depending on how many there are.

3)  Something else?
As above, I found this:
In May 2017, Linksys pushed out a firmware update that let the Velop operate in bridge mode. Unlike most mesh-router system, the Velop can now work with ISP-issued gateway devices, which combine a modem and a router, without having to disable the gateway's router functions.
From: https://www.tomsguide.com/us/linksys-velop,review-4290.html
peispudTech

Author

Commented:
I should add.... I just bought an Ubiquiti EdgeRouter X
 
I haven't installed it yet,  but from your answer,  I probably should have mentioned this.

Does this change anything?
Robert RComputer Service Technician

Commented:
Did you configure the wireless setup on the printer?, In order for the printer to print wirelessly it has to be configured to get an ip address from the default gateway or your router. If you disabled to radio on the Telcom router are you saying you disabled the broadcasting of the wireless capabilites of the router? If so then the wireless printer wont even be able to connect to the network and you will not see the printer in order to print to it.   If the printer is already setup on the wireless network and you just turned of the broadcasting of the network not the wireless net work itself, then the printer should have a valid ip address. You should be able to print off a network setup page from the printer itself this will tell you what IP address the printer has. Assuming your computer and the printer have the same subnet mask and are on the same network you should be able to communicate with the printer and install the printer drivers for this printer.
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re: EdgeRouterX: Not until you hook it up.  You can spend your money any way you like.  :-)

Seriously, we often add routers even when there is an ISP-provided router with NAT (and have to if it's without NAT)..
If the ISP-provided router can be transparent and give you a public IP address then that's the "best" way.
If you can't do that then you will have "double NAT" and some people complain about this.  I've never found it to be an issue.
If you're doing port forwarding then it makes things a bit more tedious to set up but should still work as intended.

In the olden days, the ISP routers would give you a LAN range in 192.168.0.0/24, 192.168.1.0/24, 10.0.10.0/24, etc.  There were but a few common address ranges used as default.  Today, they have smartened up and are tending to go with "random" or at least "different" address ranges.

Why is this important?
Let's say that you have an ISP with a "typical old" address range of 192.168.1.0/24.
Then, let's say that you add a device in cascade like the EdgeRouterX and it has a LAN range of 192.168.1.0/24 also.
In general and for good reasons, this isn't going to work.  You are forced to change one of those address ranges.
Recently, I encountered a Spectrum router that would default back to 192.168.1.0/24 after losing power for 5 minutes.  I call that *very* rude.
The point here is that changing the Spectrum router LAN address range was an exercise in futility.  We were FORCED to make it be the default.
The other choice is the downstream router LAN address range.  
So, my recommendation is to choose something "odd" in order ot improve the likelihood of a difference.
Then, when the ISP is changed or the ISP router is replaced, you will have an internal LAN address range that very likely will NOT match the isp address range.
Something like: 192.168.211.0/24 might be good.  I would avoid making the 3rd octet 0,1,50,100 or 254 as these are more likely to be used as defaults.  
So, when you set up the EdgeRouterX, make its LAN address be something like 192.168.211.1 and it's WAN address be obtained via DHCP from the ISP router .. which could include a public address.  I will leave firewalling setup up to you.

One caveat in using the EdgeRouterX with the Linksys sytem:  The Linksys system is supposed to be capable of stand-alone operation.  So then you have to put the first node in transparent bridge mode.  Then it might look like this I should think:

Telecom gateway --->  EdgeRouterX -->Managed switch -->Linksys Node 1 (no NAT) .~. Linksys Nodes via wireless
                                                                                                       .........all wired devices connected to the switch.
Then all the additional Linksys nodes would be wireless and/or wired to the switch or Node 1 depending on how many there are.
peispudTech

Author

Commented:
Thank your for your help.
I was successfully changed the Linksys Velop to bridge mode.    I am pleased with that.

As for the Edgerouter X
I am not 100% sure of it's efficacy.   The geek / tech podcasts that I listen to suggested this for SOHO.  

i am simply trying to not be "the lowest hanging fruit"  on the web.

Sincerely, thank you Fred & Robert.
Thanks peispud.
I have a few EdgeRouterX's that I'm using.
I got them because it appears they could handle routing a bit better than some RV042s that I've been using.
I find their GUI interface and setup a bit odd but once you get used to it......

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