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Windows 7 slow to launch on VM using SSD drive.

Dale Fye
Dale Fye asked
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I just recently cloned a VM that has been housed on my SCSI C:\ drive and installed it on an SSD drive (D:\).

After entering the password, it now takes several minutes for Windows to actually open so that I can actually do something.  

I would have thought, given the relative speed of SSD over SCSI, that it would boot faster from the SSD drive.

Is this normal?
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AlexA lack of information provides a lack of a decent solution.

Commented:
So,

Firstly, SCSI is the interface, not the hard drive it uses (which would be mechanical/HDD),  SSD is the type of drive but it almost certainly connects to a SATA port.

 Next thing would be checking the BIOS settings for the VM, make sure it's on AHCI or RAID, NOT IDE!

You may need to do a reg hack on windows as well.

Regards
Alex
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
Thanks for the lesson, Alex.  I'm certainly not a hardware guy.

I'll make the changes you recommended, but I think something else is going on.  Windows on the VM has been "spinning" for about 20 minutes since I entered my password, and still is not displaying my desktop.  

After cloning the VM yesterday, It booted OK, although slow.  After more than 20 minutes of spinning, I finally used the "shut down guest" option on the VMWare Workstation menu.  Where would I set those BIOS settings on the VM, is it in the VM machine settings somewhere?
AlexA lack of information provides a lack of a decent solution.

Commented:
What software are you using for virtualising off?
AlexA lack of information provides a lack of a decent solution.

Commented:
Also, I didn't mean to come across rude if I did, I was just trying to explain.
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
VMWare Workstation 12 Pro
AlexA lack of information provides a lack of a decent solution.

Commented:
To enter the BIOS setup for the guest operating system, click VM > Power > Power On to BIOS

Then go through and check your BIOS settings in there.
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
I'm not seeing that option.
2020-01-20-Bios-setting.jpg
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
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Commented:
I thought you may be back with it's slower than on the SSD!

if the VM worked okay on the C: drive and not correctly bad performance on the D:, and there have been no changes, I hardly think BIOS in the VM is to blame here...

as a quick test, run CrystalDiskBenchmark on C: and D: and screenshot here... and we can gauge and look at disk performance between SCSI and SSD.

https://crystalmark.info/en/software/crystaldiskmark/
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
Alex, I didn't take it as rude, I meant it when I said "thanks for the lesson"
AlexA lack of information provides a lack of a decent solution.

Commented:
Ah ok,

So I'd check for the following:

1. Shut your host down, boot into the host BIOS and then check if your hard drive is set to AHCI.

2. Make sure that VT-X  is enabled

3. Double check that your SSD is on the right SATA port. I.E a SATA 6GB port. They are normally different colours.

Regards

Alex
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
Alex, you are speaking Greek!
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017

Commented:
download and run....

as a quick test, run CrystalDiskBenchmark on C: and D: and screenshot here... and we can gauge and look at disk performance between SCSI and SSD.

https://crystalmark.info/en/software/crystaldiskmark/

lets see the results, if D: (SSD) is slower than C: (SCSI) - Q.E.D.
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
2020-01-20-CDB-C.jpg2020-01-20-CDB-D.jpg
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017
Commented:
Well those's quick crude benchmarks show D: is ,much slower than C: - so performance will be worse on the D: drive, nothing to do with VM or VMware Workstation.

So as your VM performance is based on underlying performance of the disk, the VMDK are hosted on, yes it will run slower.

But this SSD performance is really slow....

this is my crap laptop MSATA disk

2020-01-20-13_29_16-Window.png
and this laptop is 8 years old.

and this is an EVO 840 installed

 2020-01-20-13_47_32-Window.png
to make your PC go faster, requires investigation into the HOST.

Again, this is an old laptop, not designed for performance, but shows is much faster than your host.
A lack of information provides a lack of a decent solution.
Commented:
But the other thing is his SSD shouldn't be running that slowly, when you fit the SSD, can you see the colour of the port that you plugged it into?

IIRC the Blue ones are SATA 6Gb ports, the black ones are SATA 2 normally.

Also, there could be a BIOS setting which is affecting this. This would be in the host.

Oh also, did you run that benchmark from within the VM or on the host itself?
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
benchmark was run from the host, all VMs closed.
AlexA lack of information provides a lack of a decent solution.

Commented:
In which case there is definitely an issue with the host machine and the Hard drive. There is no reason that an SSD would run that slowly.

I'd check the Port type and make sure it's set to AHCI, can you tell me what motherboard you have?
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
Alex, have a meeting with a client shortly, so am going to have to pause this thread for several hours.

It is an older Windows 7 computer, maybe 6 years old, but has been performing well until I cloned this VM onto the SSD.  That is one of the reasons I'm trying to move the VMs over to the SSD, but I still have to be able to boot those VMs.  I will eventually, soon, be getting a new desktop and want to be able to simply move the SSD into the new computer when I do that.

Dale
Dale FyeOwner, Dev-Soln LLC
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Commented:
Thanks guys, for the feedback.

Guess I need to figure out what is going on between my host PC and the SSD drive, or speedup that process of purchasing the new PC.
AlexA lack of information provides a lack of a decent solution.

Commented:
If you can show me a picture of where your SSD is, we should be able to decipher if it's on the correct port.

Up to you though.

Regards
Alex