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free/trial recovery tools to recover from a crashed SSD

Last week, my laptop suddenly powered off & could not be powered on
anymore: the IT guys replace battery, use different adapter but can't
power it on & the 500GB SSD that comes with the X270 can't be
read as well when they mounted it to a reader: this reader is plugged
into another PC's USB.

I suspect it could be due to me using 3rd party battery at that time tt
caused a surge/overcurrent that failed both the laptop & the SSD.

Ontrack is charging $3500 for recovery so I'm looking for tools that
I can DIY to do the recovery: anyone can recommend any tools (if
there's any specifically for SSD): those with free 'trial' can be
considered;  wanted a best chance of recovering data from the SSD.
I might need assistance here with using the recommended tools
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
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Most Valuable Expert 2013
Commented:

wanted a best chance of recovering data from the SSD.


Then send it to a data recovery company.


And start using online services like One Drive, Drop Box, Carbonite, etc to backup your devices, especially if you're going to risk their functioning using third party items like batteries.  I've got 3 laptops and 2 desktops and an RDP server and if ANY of them die, I really don't care.  All my data is backed up at multiple locations


Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software Engineer
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Commented:
500GB SSD that comes with the X270 can't be read as well when they mounted it to a reader


If the drive cannot be seen when it is attached to a USB SATA adapter, then there is no alternative but Ontrack or one of their competitors.  The most likely reason that a drive cannot be seen when attached to an adapter is that the drive's controller is fried.  In an SSD the controller and flash chips are on the same board so "just replace the controller board" is not a possibility.

There is no software tool that can get data off a drive which does not present itself to the controller.

Ontrack's quote may be steep, but it reflects the difficulty in desoldering the flash chips from that board, attaching them to their recovery hardware, knowing the "magic" particular to that board's controller chip to be able to read out the chips correctly, and returning you a new drive with the recovered drive imaged onto it.  It also takes into account that if the flash chips fried as well, they go to all the effort and get paid nothing for it.

Note that even if the drive is recovered, that may not be the end of the issues.  If the drive was encrypted, if the Trusted Platform Module was enabled, if you can't obtain an exactly identical replacement laptop to put the recovered drive into, if Windows decides to invalidate the license due to being on a new platform ... there may be more issues down the road.

I/M/O;  Best to buy a new laptop ($3500 should buy a nice one), then get the last full backup image of the failed drive, attach that image of the crashed system to the new system as a pseudo-drive, and recover what can be recovered from the backup.
Jackie Man IT Manager
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Commented:
Agreed.

If you are in IT forensics business, you will know why Ontrack demands you so much to do the task.

Essentially, it is a forensics job which requires very expensive forensics hardware and software and the whole task needs highly experienced and skilful personnel (highly paid) in a dust-free environment (high operating costs).

Unless you are in the data recovery business, you will not invest so much and the cost charged to you is only a minor one if the data is critical for your business.
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Commented:
Unlike hdds where the spindle is attached to reading heads. Ssd .....

Idrive backup, backup tools ....

Potentially there may have been indications of ...


You could look at datarecovery.com, no affiliation

But with ssd the costs are steep.
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Commented:
the only thing that can help (not sure) is connecting the drive directly to a sata cable - not over usb
also - what SSD model do you have?

Author

Commented:
>what SSD model do you have?
IT guy just told me it's Samsung.

Should have left most of my stuff in the O365 (which I have 99GB quota)
 rather than archive to local pst: a local pst is 'locked' when I'm in Outlook
so Outlook has to exit before it could be backed up.

Author

Commented:
Btw IT guy said the SSD reader detects the SSD but got a
hardware failure;  I'll get a screen shot of that error.

When inserted into an X1 carbon Thinkpad, the BIOS of
this laptop can't detect it.  My crashed laptop was X270
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Commented:
post the exact model plse - its PRINTED on the SSD
is the ssd seen in the bios correct?  thtat 's the first step

but i must say i dont know of any "tool" to recover a bad SSD -  let alone freeware ones…
you NEED to have a BACKUP - and better more than 1

Author

Commented:
Will post it when I'm back to office this Thu.
Ontrack has free version for Home user for recovering up to a certain amount of data.
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Commented:
The free tools often are for recovering deleted data where the SSD is accessible.
I do not believe there are free tools that deal with HW failure whether it is a failed controller or failed memory chips.

If the controller sata interchange works, but access to the underlying data is not there check whether the issue is corruption of table,........

Author

Commented:
On remounting it again, IT team was able to read the SSD &
is currently copying out the files: heard it paused mid way.

Will update tomorrow when the IT guy is back.

Author

Commented:
Was able to copy out the entire SSD after mounting it into another Thinkpad, thanks.
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Commented:
then i believe that it's not a bad SSD, but a bad laptop