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Problems with "Your info" in Win10 after Office 365 install

sasllc
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I set up a small LAN for the customer with three Win10 Pro PCs, NOT a domain setup.  Had I known to look, I suspect all would have shown "Local Account" on the Settings > Account> Your Info page, with the picture of their choice.  But the problem is that now they all show (fake name) "bob.jones@abc.compress.com" with Bob's profile picture.  If either of the two who are not Bob change the profile picture, it changes it for Bob as well, getting him upset, and I've heard that other things are unexpectedly changing as well for all three of them if one person makes a change--but I don't know any details yet.

I suspect that this all started when I downloaded Bob's Office 365 subscription for all three PCs.  On the Microsoft site it showed that it could be installed on up to five devices.  But now I'm wondering if that only meant Bob's devices, and that the other two PCs need to buy their own subscription in order to be "separated" from Bob.  Is that true?  I need to know for sure because they are going to be quite upset if I tell them each have to buy their own subscription.

Back to the Settings > Home> Your Info screen....it has place where I can click on "Stop signing in to all Microsoft apps automatically".  Would that solve all these problems?  Would the Office 365 subscription they are sharing still function properly?  

Note that their individual Office 365 installs ARE working properly...Outlook is set up for each individual email address and getting that person's email, and Word is getting the correct local documents for each user.

Please help me understand how to handle this, so each computer is independent of each other--just as they were before I installed Office 365.  TIA
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Simple Geek from the '70s
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Commented:
Bob's Office 365 subscription for all three PCs.  On the Microsoft site it showed that it could be installed on up to five devices.  But now I'm wondering if that only meant Bob's devices, and that the other two PCs need to buy their own subscription in order to be "separated" from Bob.  Is that true?
Yes that is true.

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Commented:
Back to the Settings > Home> Your Info screen....it has place where I can click on "Stop signing in to all Microsoft apps automatically".  Would that solve all these problems?  Would the Office 365 subscription they are sharing still function properly?

I suspect the answer is "No", but I want to be sure that this would not be a quick fix.

Once I persuade them to each buy their own Office 365 subscription, would their existing Outlook setup continue to work fine as they stand right now at this moment, or will I have to do additional setup work?  They each have their own individual POP3 email address.

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Commented:
I finally got this worked out.  Below is what I sent to the customer tonight:

I spent quite a bit of time online today with a guy at Microsoft going over all this stuff about the correct way to utilize and log into Office 365 on each computer.  Apparently things have changed now with Windows 10, where you can no longer log into the Microsoft account as Bob and simply “download” Office 365.  Instead I had to send an “offer” to Sue’s computer via email to accept a shared use of the software.  So this evening I did just that, going around in all kinds of crazy circles, getting her logged into Office 365 with her newly configured Office 365 share.    

Once the user profile showed Sue logged in with her name rather than Bob’s, I changed the screen picture by pulling one out of her pictures folder, hoping that it will not affect Bob’s dog picture.  I guess we will see what happens with that.

Then it was insisting that I use that Microsoft password to log into Windows, and it also required me to set up a PIN, etc., etc.  But now I have the computer back to logging in like normal, with no PIN, and no Office 365 password…just a local login as in the past.  I also found a place in Sue’s user profile that still listed Bob’s Microsoft account for her computer, in addition to her new account, so I deleted Bob’s from Sue’s computer.