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Agile

Agile software development is a set of software development methods in which requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing, cross-functional teams. The agile philosophy promotes adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, and encourages rapid and flexible response to change. Agile methods break tasks into small increments with minimal planning and do not directly involve long-term planning. Iterations are short time frames involving a cross-functional team working in all functions: planning, requirements analysis, design, coding, unit testing, and acceptance testing. Working software is the primary measure of progress.

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JIRA: Removing old sprints from migrated ticket to resolve a velocity chart issue
Ran into an interesting problem in JIRA that I managed to solve this morning. Figured it might help out others, so here goes!

It turns out that if you had a ticket that was part of a Sprint in one Project, but then either move it to another project or clone it, it'll still retain a history of the prior closed sprints it was in. At first, that doesn't seem like a big deal, but it means that the Project it's now part of will have messed up Velocity Charts, because it'll start including the Sprints from the other Project. And there's no obvious way to remove the old Sprints from the ticket (editing the ticket only lets you change the current Sprint assignment, not clear out prior ones.) No good!

Fortunately, the Bulk Edit feature provides a workaround and will let you clear out the old Sprint associations, which will then fix the Velocity Charts. And here's how to do it:
  1. Run a search that'll return the ticket you need to remove the sprints from.
  2. Choose the "Bulk Change" option from the "three-dot menu" in the upper right.
  3. Check only the ticket you want to change. Hit Next button.
  4. Choose "Edit Issues". Hit Next button.
  5. Check the "Change Sprint" option. Leave it blank. Hit Next button.
  6. Review the Confirmation screen. Hit Confirm button.
  7. Hit Acknowledge button when the progress meter is done.

For reference:
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Author Comment

by:Brian Matis
One word of caution: be careful when doing this! Bulk Change is quite powerful and if you're not watching out, you could accidentally change a lot more than what you really want to. I imagine this is why Bulk Change has so many steps to it... Sometimes I'm glad when a task is a bit difficult and cumbersome to do :-)
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How to Use the Help Bell
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How to Use the Help Bell

Need to boost the visibility of your question for solutions? Use the Experts Exchange Help Bell to confirm priority levels and contact subject-matter experts for question attention.  Check out this how-to article for more information.

Technology teams care about budget, time limits and iterative production, that’s why product designers should be politicians and act fare.
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Deploying our service is a grudge match between customer benefits and customer pain. In one corner, rolling out fixes (yay!) and delivering new features (double yay!). In the other corner, training on new features (boo – sounds like work), and change management processes (more work).


We put a great deal of effort into optimizing these processes, so it’s important to share how we think through these optimizations. For now, I’ll narrow focus on the issue-fix aspect of the deployment process, and in later blogs I’ll cover new feature delivery.


The fine printBefore I start, a quick disclaimer: what I’m about to describe is subject to change. We’ve been a fanatical agile shop for nearly seven years and we believe change is an important principle of the agile approach. So, if you’re reading this in 2017 or later, please understand that we might have tweaked some of these details. OK, now for the good stuff…


Bug zapping

You might not be surprised to hear that bugs are occasionally found in our service (I know, the horror!). Nobody likes bugs, so we need to address them as soon as possible. And because our service uses a number of telecommunication providers to make text messages flong (on my iPhone, anyway), phones ring, and other third-party communication channels do their thing, managing the infrastructure related to these providers requires constant effort. In short, we need to be able to release and deploy fixes FAST.


Keep those cards and letters coming

It also might not surprise you to hear that our customers ask for new features (the audacity!). From July 1st to Sept 30th, we received 133 service enhancement requests – that’s 2+ per business day. The product managers who handle these requests interpret them into new features and then work with our engineers to build them.


So far, so good – and in theory we should be getting these features into your hands ASAP. But these features are product changes: while the customers who asked for a change are willing to take on any additional testing and training work to get their new features, customers who don’t intend to use the new features don’t want that burden imposed on them. That means we need a process that doesn’t force new features on customers too quickly.


Balancing the need for speed

Okay, so we can probably agree we want fixes fast and features not too fast – how can we possibly strike this balance?


First, by using deployment speed: we deploy at least weekly, if not more frequently. Our core sprint work uses a continuous delivery process which we deploy on a weekly schedule so that we can seamlessly deliver non-critical fixes at that cadence. We can also generate and deploy critical fixes in between these weekly deployments as necessary to address issues like zero-day vulnerabilities.


Second, by using feature flags: deployments include the latest feature developments, but some features are not quite ready for your use after just one sprint. And as previously mentioned, your user base might be confused if new buttons and features show up every week. So we use feature flags/toggles on our new features so that we can conditionally turn them on when we’re ready to release them. That allows the new fixes to get out the door without having new features show up. (We’ll talk more about feature flags in another blog, but those of you who are new to xMatters might want to check out our Early Access Program if you want to play with new features faster).


Third, through thoughtful communication: because fixes can cause behavior changes in the system, we have implemented a new communication process to advertise the parts of the service we worked on so customers can keep an eye out for any unexpected behavior. Our support notes are designed to provide this information (here’s a sample from the deployments leading up to our Rogue release). Those notes work in conjunction with the scheduled maintenance posts on our status page to ensure this information is delivered by the latest technologies.


Using these three mechanisms, we can offer the best mix of quick fixes – without forcing training and change management on our customers.

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How many times a day do you open, acknowledge, or close an IT incident? What’s your process? Do you have a process depending on the incident, systems involved, and other factors? New Relic Alerts gives you options for how you interact with notification channels for sending alerts.


Alerts is a new tool to manage your alerting policies and integrate with team communication tools like xMatters, HipChat, Slack, and more—so you can immediately let the right people know when critical issues arise.


We’re pleased to announce that xMatters is an official notification channel in New Relic Alerts.


With the new integration, New Relic provides a notification channel that you can use to manage your xMatters integration and communication plans easily. You can also use custom payload webhooks to control how the xMatters alert is delivered.


xMatters allows you to automate and structure communication as events unfold during a deployment or service outage. New Relic enables you to manage alerting policies and integrations, while still providing industry-leading insights.


How it works
With New Relic Alerts, you can choose the communication tool and easily set up the integration.



xMatters has a similarly easy interface for setting up an integration with New Relic.



Reaping the benefits

New Relic integrates with xMatters to replace manual steps in incident management processes:

  • Notify resolvers based on escalation rules, on-call schedules, skills, and location
  • Enrich notifications with insights from New Relic and other tools in the IT toolchain, to provide actionable content and increase resolver efficiency
  • Configure response options that trigger other xMatters integrations and drive workflow for tasks such as creating tickets, updating consoles, sending additional notifications, and initiating chat & conference-call collaboration all with context from New Relic alerts
  • Use the xMatters mobile app to quickly look up who’s on call, receive & respond to notifications, and engage other teams to minimize time to resolve service disruptions
  • Continuously improve operational processes with reporting & analytics
  • Allow stakeholders to manage subscription and notification preferences for proactive communications during service disruptions


xMatters is now available as a New Relic Alerts notification channel. Please visit https://www.xmatters.com/integration/new-relic for more information.

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When the s#!t hits the fan, you don’t have time to look up who’s on call, draft emails, call collaborators, or send text messages. An instant chat window is definitely the way to go, especially one like HipChat.


HipChat is a true business app. And while it’s tempting to call it a chat application, it’s much more. It’s persistent, searchable, and loaded with extras like group chat, video chat, screen sharing, and airtight security.


So if you’re busy doing other things when a nasty incident ticket starts hogging space on your screen, how quickly and effectively can you get into HipChat? That’s where we come in.


Combined with xMatters, this integration allows individuals to collaborate with the correct on-call resources via HipChat to coordinate and resolve incidents faster. xMatters leverages your group on-call schedules and rotations, escalation rules, and user device preferences to quickly engage the right resources into a targeted HipChat room.


Linking HipChat in your toolchain


Integration xMatters with your monitoring, ITSM, incident management, and communication tools enables you to share data across your entire incident resolution toolchain. Using the xMatters integration, you can open a HipChat room directly from JIRA Service desk or another ITSM system without leaving the ITSM environment.


When you send invitations to collaborate from HipChat, they reference key data from monitoring tools or service management systems. All this data enables your resolution teams to quickly get up to speed and act.


Within the targeted HipChat room, members can use slash commands to see who is on call from a specific team, invite additional resources, and make updates to a service management ticket or StatusPage listing. xMatters eliminates the need to switch back and forth between systems, so your team can resolve incidents instead of worrying about record keeping.


Here are a few other things you can do with the xMatters HipChat integration:

  • Automatically assign a JIRA issue to the responder
  • Record HipChat activity back into a service management ticket
  • Use slash commands to add comments to a service management ticket or StatusPage


Adding HipChat to your xMatters instance is easy. Just visit our Integrations Directory!

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Dramatic changes are revolutionizing how we build and use technology. Every company is automating, digitizing, and modernizing operations. We need a better, more connected way to work together as teams so we can harness the insights from our systems and drive effective collaboration.


Just a few years ago, we were all looking around and asking each other the same question. Fortunately, some people are figuring it out and providing some guidance on how DevOps processes can improve all areas of business, from development and operations to monitoring and incident management.


Here are a few examples from our customers.


Pacific Life has transitioned its monitoring from a human-operated system to an automated one. Leaders had to overcome employee anxiety over losing jobs and providing direct access to customers.


Intermountain Healthcare, Utah’s largest nonprofit healthcare provider, has connected systems to provide telehealth first-response technology and major incident management processes.


Dealertrack is the leading provider of on-demand, integrated digital solutions designed to enhance the efficiency and profitability for all major segments of the automotive retail industry. Thanks to a combination of monitoring, management, and communication tools, Dealertrack has improved their time to resolve issues and product development speed.


So we know that dramatic changes are needed in how we build and use technology. And yet, a 2017 survey of DevOps maturity shows that only 36% of organizations have good knowledge sharing between development and operations.


The DevOps experts who know

Where can you go to hear how experts are solving these complex problems?


We're bring the Agility 2017 Tour to a city near you, where you can hear from experts and pick their brains regarding how they’re improving business and trends you should be preparing for. It's a great opportunity to hear from more than just talking heads.


Agility 2017 starts in San Francisco on June 13, then moves to New York on June 20, Chicago on June 22, and London on June 29. Besides the customers listed above, we'll be including New York City Health + Hospitals, Forrester, The Telegraph, O2, Tesco, Moogsoft, Cherwell, Praecipio, and others.


You'll also hear from our own experts, including CEO Troy McAlpin and CTO Abbas Haider Ali. They will be discussing:


  • The need for a better, more connected way to work together as teams
  • How to harness the insights from systems to drive collaboration
  • And in doing so, naturally preventing incidents within the normal flow of work


Reserve your seat at a free Agility 2017 event near you before they all disappear!

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I'm an IT report developer with a few miles on my belt. Officially we are the Business Intelligence team. We use SAP Business Intelligence Suite 4.2, aka BusinessObjects. I remember James Martin back in the day (1990's) but haven't heard or read much about him, not that I'm the most well read person around. But I do have a pretty good library of software development books, from Karl Weigers to Steve McConnell to Gerald Weinberg, and "The Mythical Man Month". At the moment I'm trying to bring our organization into modern times in regards to Business Intelligence. What we have are awful legacy minded reports that no one uses, i.e., 85% of active OLTP users run NO reports (and the OLTP itself is a 1990's style system).

We are also trying to bring in Crystal Reports for high-end reporting, and other tools for "Dashboards".

Around here it's a totally legacy mindset, to include a CIO who's up there in years and is totally old-school, constantly referencing to James Martin and his approach. So is JM still a "classic" who's books should be on my shelf (to include reading them)? In order to influence the organization to "get modern", I have to start by convincing the CIO that there's a better way nowadays (to Business Intelligence).  Also, no one around here knows how to spell "agile".

Do you have a recommended James Martin classic or two, at least so I can be able to step up intellectually to where the CIO is coming from? And while I'm at it, any other classic books / …
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Too much UX Research is bad. Lean UX focuses on constant user feedback and improvement rather than on intense preliminary feedback. Check out this article If you want to learn more about Lean UX.

https://blog.prototypr.io/the-benefit-of-using-lean-ux-7aeff7347e2b#.wf3b3wyeb
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Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Comment from the article
I like the idea of getting everyone involved in testing to reduce the distance between those building the product and those actually using it.
This.
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There's nothing quite like a beta launch to get a bunch of people in the office hopping and finding new things we'd never seen happen before!

Just got in a patch for:
  • URLs shifting to the left of Posts in the home feed
  • "Add topics" warning disrupting flow if embedding was used in a Post

And working on tracking down a possible infinite loop as part of the setup walkthrough
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Expert Comment

by:ModeIT
Removed all cookies associated to EE fixed it for me.

MIT
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Author Comment

by:Brian Matis
Ugh... sorry that happened to you ModeIT! Glad you were able to get past it.

We've got a fix for it coming in next Monday's release. Per my understanding, logging out and back in wasn't a guaranteed workaround and the root issue was with how the system was counting the topics being followed.
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Read about the ways of improving workplace communication.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Comment Utility
Great article, Oscar! This is a topic becoming incredibly important to me. I love how many new sorts of techniques and tools there are for fostering improved communication, but it's definitely in a major transitional period. There are so many options! I've had to figure out things like what type of communication preferences different people have, to try to make sure I'm using the one that they prefer. Like how some people prefer email and rarely check chat, whereas others can be the exact opposite! Exciting times for sure...

I also love your mention of team building activities. One idea I've toyed with is using cooperative style board games, such as Pandemic. Wondering if anyone else has tried things like that?
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Build and deliver software with DevOps
Build and deliver software with DevOps

A digital transformation requires faster time to market, shorter software development lifecycles, and the ability to adapt rapidly to changing customer demands. DevOps provides the solution.

Course summary and where to go from here
With the power of JIRA, there's an unlimited number of ways you can customize it, use it and benefit from it. With that in mind, there's bound to be things that I wasn't able to cover in this course. With this summary we'll look at some places to go for more help when you need it.
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Well this is interesting... Atlassian (makers of JIRA) just purchased Trello. I use JIRA for work and Trello for personal things, so I'm really curious about how this will play out.

https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/09/atlassian-acquires-trello/
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Really enjoyed this article re: the importance of keeping your ego in check when designing. Also had some great points about starting small and focused.

Design for Reality, Not Glory
http://blog.invisionapp.com/design-for-reality-not-glory/
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Find Your Happy Place. Every company and every work group has their own culture. If you are considering starting a new job here are some good engineering/culture questions to ask a prospective employer.
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Expert Comment

by:Mikkel Sandberg
Comment Utility
Great article Marlon!
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Intriguing article that's pretty relevant for anyone doing Agile development. Team I'm on was just having a discussion related to this earlier today!

Scrum vs. Kanban: How to combine the best of both worlds:
https://techbeacon.com/scrum-vs-kanban-how-combine-best-both-methods
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Comunicación con notas
"In order to have an organized way for empathy mapping, we rely on a psychological model and trying to model it in a simple way, so we will split the board to three section for each persona and a scenario and try to see what those personas would Do, Think and Feel, when they are in that scenario."
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We're moving from Rally to Jira and have the export set up so we can move projects from Rally to Jira quite well.  Any fields not mapped are put straight in the description field.  We are using this method - https://help.rallydev.com/jira-installation-user-guide

However, we now have stories/defects that include test cases.  I haven't seen or used the test case functionality in Jira.  It looks like there are add-ons to create this functionality.

My question is, do you have any advice for either using Jira as-is for test case functionality (e.g. modifying workflow) and exporting those test cases from Rally to Jira?  Or, using an add-on, and is it possible to export from Rally to Jira for the add-ons?  Is there a recommended add-on for test cases - particularly one thats similar to Rally?
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What are  the standard documents that should be included in a final delivery of a website to a customer.
If there are AGILE standards please include them.

To be clear, when a website project is completed and delivery to a customer is ready, what delivery documents should be given to the customer.
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Hi

Not sure if this is a valid question for Experts Exchange...

My team usually charge customers on a fixed price waterfall basis. More and more customers are asking us to work in an agile manner. Notwithstanding the fact that we'll need to train up on how to work in a successful agile manner, we're not sure how the billing would work.

Our customers very much like our fixed price approach as it gives them certainty for their budgets. But without a clear signed off Requirements Brief up front, we can't continue with a fixed price model can we?

One current client started a fixed price waterfall project and now wants to move to "agile" - i.e. they are disorganised and want to drip feed info to us over a longer period of time. By changing the phasing of deliverables (it was 1 phase now they want 2 or 3). We would normally charge extra to split a 1 phase project into 2 phases as we have more setup and testing etc across 2 phases.

So the key question is this I think: are all agile projects charged on a Time & Materials basis, or is it possible to do a fixed price agile project? The only way that I could think of doing it would be to say "you are paying for xx days and you can use them up as and when you want."

Thanks for your help!
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The top UI technologies you need to be aware of
The top UI technologies you need to be aware of

An important part of the job as a front-end developer is to stay up to date and in contact with new tools, trends and workflows. That’s why you cannot miss this upcoming webinar to explore the latest trends in UI technologies!

"Disruption" is the most feared word for C-level executives these days. They agonize over their industry being disturbed by another player - most likely by startups.
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What is the most popular java frameworks currently being used for agile web development (i.e spring, struts, servlets and in high-demand for career development?

Also, how long on average it would take to learn basics and start programming web pages in java.
I have used JSP once and thought the tag based language is fairly easy.

I have used it about 5 years ago but forgot it. I have been using oracle PL/SQL and SQL,
HTML, Javascipt, XML etc.
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Hi,

I have a question that hopefully somebody can clarify.

Take a situation an Agile type situation if you have a Sprint and one of the artifacts in the Sprint has multiple developers working on it. So Project A and Project B in this example.

Let's say that all appropriate merging takes place throughout the process.

So, Project A has some of the work in progress of Project B.

Project A is done but Project B is getting moved to the next Sprint.

Project A still has some of the work in progress changes from Project B.

And the end of the sprint project A is going to be released into the appropriate environment.

However, it would be released with the work in progress items from Project B which have not been completed which is not a good solution to deploy.

How would/could this be handled appropriately?

Any information would be great!
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Hi community and thanks to anyone who responds.

My company has a client who has been running a classic ASP application for many many years.  My client is still in contact with the original programmer who has promised for nearly 2 years to update the application from ASP to ASP.NET.  This has yet to happen and now I've been tasked with finding a migration path and solution to champion for them.

I've done some research and keep landing on PHP and ASP.NET as solutions.  Originally JavaScript was thrown out as a possible path but I haven't seen much discussion about migrating classic ASP to JavaScript.  It seems as though ASP.NET and PHP are the two most commonly mentioned.  

The client suspected ASP.NET would involve large amounts of money, software, hardware, programmer's time, etc. Is this the case?

PHP seems much easier to use and less complicated by far and by such I suspect it would be easier to find programmers just because there are more of them simply because it's Open Source and free for the most part.

Hosting also seems to be much less expensive.  Linux vs Microsoft.  That pretty much speaks for itself.

Where is JavaScript in all of this?  Can we truly compare server-side to client-side languages?

I guess I need to know what the advantages are with ASP.NET rather than PHP or JavaScript.

Thanks.
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The Quality Assurance engineer of an Agile scrum team must "own" the acceptance criteria for sprint tasks.
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Can I get some recommendations for software used to run a small service-based business. 10 employees. tracking hours, pay, inventory of materials, expenses, etc.
to be run on Windows, or Linux or Mac OS.  Haven't decided on OS platform yet.
(Currently doing everything in MS Word and Excel.)
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Agile

Agile software development is a set of software development methods in which requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing, cross-functional teams. The agile philosophy promotes adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, and encourages rapid and flexible response to change. Agile methods break tasks into small increments with minimal planning and do not directly involve long-term planning. Iterations are short time frames involving a cross-functional team working in all functions: planning, requirements analysis, design, coding, unit testing, and acceptance testing. Working software is the primary measure of progress.