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Anti-Virus Apps

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Anti-virus software was originally developed to detect and remove computer viruses. However, with the proliferation of other kinds of malware, antivirus software started to provide protection from other computer threats. In particular, modern antivirus software can protect from malicious browser helper objects (BHOs), browser hijackers, ransomware, keyloggers, backdoors, rootkits, trojan horses, worms, malicious layered service providers (LSPs), dialers, fraud tools, adware and spyware. Some products also include protection from other computer threats, such as infected and malicious URLs, spam, scam and phishing attacks, online identity theft (privacy), online banking attacks, social engineering techniques, Advanced Persistent Threat (APT), botnets and DDoS attacks.

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Put Machine Learning to Work--Protect Your Clients
Put Machine Learning to Work--Protect Your Clients

Machine learning means Smarter Cybersecurity™ Solutions.
As technology continues to advance, managing and analyzing massive data sets just can’t be accomplished by humans alone. It requires huge amounts of memory and storage, as well as high-speed processing of the cloud.

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Many are looking to uninstall Kaspersky Lab software from their computers, amidst recent plans by the Department of Homeland Security to "remove and discontinue present and future use of the products."

While Kaspersky’s instructions for this may paint the process as straight-forward, we’ve often seen issues in uninstalling Kaspersky anti-virus, for example:

If you do plan to uninstall Kaspersky and run into any issues, don’t hesitate to Ask your question in the Anti-Virus Apps topic.

And as always, make sure you have an antivirus and malware protection system installed, like Webroot or Immunet.
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
Yeah @Nicholas. Generally you'd expect the accusations to have some evidence to back them up. Will be interesting to see what emerges from this and how Kaspersky's business is able to handle the fallout.
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Expert Comment

by:Jim Horn
That matches up with the hard sell tactics Micro Center used on me when I bought my last laptop in an effort to upsell me on Kaspersky's anti-virus software.
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For those who like to keep up..

The latest AV Comparatives Real-World Protection Test February – June 2017 has been released.
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"Prohibits the DOD from using software platforms developed by Kaspersky Lab due to
reports that the Moscow-based company might be vulnerable to Russian government
influence."

https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/FY18%20NDAA%20summary2.pdf

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/government/senate-gets-ready-to-ban-kaspersky-products-as-fbi-interviews-companys-us-employees/

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A recent post by Brian Matis motivated me to make this alternate post to see what sort of reaction others might have about these recent revelations.

A recent article on The Verge claims that "The older operating system was less vulnerable that anyone expected"

Windows XP computers were mostly immune to WannaCry

Another article from the same source claims "Windows XP was ‘insignificant,’ researchers say" with regards to helping the WannaCry outbreak spread.

"Almost all WannaCry victims were running Windows 7"

Lots of folks (from their perspective) with a genuine need to keep running on Windows XP suffered a lot of grief in Tech forums as being one of the root causes of giving WannaCry a platform to spread and thrive from, yet now it appears all the criticism may have been a little premature and unjustified.

For the record, I personally don't condone anyone using unsupported operating systems and actively encourage everyone I deal with to get themselves up to date, but I am also sympathetic to those who feel they have a genuine need to do that, so also think they shouldn't be …
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Expert Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
We have too many XP computers at my institution (some with only SP2) - mostly due to budgets and instrumentation.
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Thomas,
Have you considered purchasing an XP Updates agreement with Microsoft? Might be an easier solution if budget restraints prevent you from upgrading? I wouldn't feel comfortable with a lot of XP machines in an environment as it would be a case of when, not if, it will come back to bite you.  Patches are available, just at a cost.

Incidentally, SP3 for XP is still provided by Microsoft - why not install it?

Steps to take before you install Windows XP Service Pack 3

How to obtain Windows XP Service Pack 3 (SP3)

Cheers..
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Expert Comment

by:Christ Harold
Thanks for Valuable Information Sir

Christ
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Author Comment

by:Jackie Man
You are welcome.

Please feel free to post any question in Android topic,
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There seems to be a general consensus that if you've been hit with a Ransomware Virus, especially if by a newly discovered strain of ransomware, and do not have a reliable and unaffected backup to restore from, that all hope is lost.  

This is not necessarily the case!

Whilst it's true that Ransomware is one of the most difficult "destructive infections" to recover from, recovery should never be considered impossible.

Advising those seeking help that they should just accept defeat and wipe all chances of recovering their data is bad advice. This is a point that has been proven time and time again, particularly with past Ransomware strains that were once considered hopeless, yet have now had decryption recovery tools developed to restore data.

If you have been hit by a Ransomware Virus and don't have a backup - do not accept advice that you should just cut your losses, format your hard drive and admit defeat. That's just letting the criminals win.

The first thing you should do (after deactivating the virus) is make a Full Image Backup of your affected hard drive using an imaging backup tool like Acronis, Macrium Reflect or similar so as to have a copy of all files that were encrypted.  Safely store that backup away for future recovery attempts, or to restore from if a recovery attempt goes belly up.

Once backed up, Wipe and Start fresh if desired to get back to a working …
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Security companies do have excellent heuristics and definitions,  but they will never catch everything.

No argument.  But doesn't it then naturally follow that they can never "block" or "prevent" everything either?

Using that train of thought, even with all of the security software that you have protecting your machine(s), how can you be certain that you don't have a key logger recording your key strokes right now? Or a yet unknown time bomb trojan just waiting to jump up and deliver its payload? How could any system ever be trustable?

I'm honestly not trying to be argumentative here, it's just that the logic behind your conclusion is escaping me.

If you can't trust your security software to clean up an infection that has been researched and that it knows about, then how is it that you can trust the same software to prevent a yet unrealized one from occurring?

I'll agree we probably need to disagree.  

Life would be too boring if everyone agreed on everything anyway. :)

My thanks again for your input.
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Expert Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
I guess what I meant was that no one security software is likely to catch everything.  That is why I have a multilayered approach on my machines.  But you are correct, I do not feel safe even with that.  I guess I am on the paranoid side, which begs the question, "Is one paranoid, if the fear is true?"  That is a paraphrase of the original question.

The biggest problem, IMHO, is that to secure one's computer (and still have a computer that actually works, instead of one filled with cement), one needs to put enough security software on there that it slows down even the best of computers.

I would like a product that doesn't hog resources and assures me that I will never get malware of any kind (like that is happening).
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Author Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Nice.  Thank you.
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
I blame the NSA for creating the tools!
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ESET are offering free online Cyber Security Awareness Training to educate employees about the dangers online.  If you're interested in knowing a little more about the very basics of Cyber Security you can have a look at the course here:
https://www.eset.com/us/cybertraining/
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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
WOW! That is pretty cool. Thanks for sharing :D
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Author Comment

by:David Atkin
You're welcome Juana :)
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Anti-Virus Apps

22K

Solutions

23K

Contributors

Anti-virus software was originally developed to detect and remove computer viruses. However, with the proliferation of other kinds of malware, antivirus software started to provide protection from other computer threats. In particular, modern antivirus software can protect from malicious browser helper objects (BHOs), browser hijackers, ransomware, keyloggers, backdoors, rootkits, trojan horses, worms, malicious layered service providers (LSPs), dialers, fraud tools, adware and spyware. Some products also include protection from other computer threats, such as infected and malicious URLs, spam, scam and phishing attacks, online identity theft (privacy), online banking attacks, social engineering techniques, Advanced Persistent Threat (APT), botnets and DDoS attacks.