Automotive

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In addition to ignition, power and monitoring gauges and lights, today's motor vehicles feature computerized engines, transmissions and braking systems, electronic mapping systems, Bluetooth and Internet connectivity, sensors that detect other vehicles, motorized seats, and digital audio and video systems; several manufacturers are producing electric and hybrid automobiles and self-driving cars.

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This is one example of why driving cars is so complicated. There are huge amounts of variables to account for.
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Expert Comment

by:Dustin Saunders
@Daniella - I know, I was just teasing.

@Michael -  I'm actually quite familiar with the Great Emu war.  I use it all the time as an allegory.

@Andrew -  No judgement in brainstorming!  :P
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by:Lucas Bishop
From what I've seen, Drop Bears confuse driverless cars as well.
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"Experts say that widespread hacks of cars may soon become a reality." In the very near future, I expect an extra upsell for a top of the line security package, in addition to the usual upsells, like leather or heated seats.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/06/01/how-hacked-computer-code-allegedly-helped-biker-gang-steal-150-jeeps/?utm_term=.a1cc284aae86
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by:Brian Matis
Intriguing... When it comes to handling security issues like the one described in the article, it sounds like the automaker either had a breach of their key code database and/or a bad process for authenticating duplicate key requests. I'd say the automaker should deal with fixing those sorts of issues just like they would a safety recall. A certain baseline of security is to be expected. Like, if there was a mistake in an old-style non-electronic key that meant the same key would work in all cars of that model... You'd better believe we'd expect the automaker to cover that cost of fixing it.

But just like a car alarm can be a security upsell, I could easily envision new high-tech security add-ons to help against potential theft. Like maybe a car that would text you if it was taken for a drive at a time you don't usually drive it?
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by:Brian Matis
That's really cool! It's awesome when techniques from one field (pun not intended) can be applied to another.
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Anyone looking for a fun do-it-yourself project? This college student converted his Honda Civic into a self-driving car using a smartphone, freely available software, a 3D printed case, and circuit board he soldered himself. Fascinating stuff, but I'll be honest, it seems a bit dangerous and I wonder what sort of laws will be cropping up soon as a result of projects like this...

Then again, it's not like human drivers are particularly safe and perhaps even a hobbyist level self-driving modification would still be safer than your average person...

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/603637/how-a-college-kid-made-his-honda-civic-self-driving-for-700/
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Automotive

1K

Solutions

3

Articles & Videos

1K

Contributors

In addition to ignition, power and monitoring gauges and lights, today's motor vehicles feature computerized engines, transmissions and braking systems, electronic mapping systems, Bluetooth and Internet connectivity, sensors that detect other vehicles, motorized seats, and digital audio and video systems; several manufacturers are producing electric and hybrid automobiles and self-driving cars.