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CAD/Architecture Software

Computer-aided design (CAD) is the use of computer systems to aid in the creation, modification, analysis, or optimization of a design. CAD output is often in the form of electronic files for print, machining, or other manufacturing operations. CAD software for mechanical design uses either vector-based graphics to depict the objects of traditional drafting, or may also produce raster graphics showing the overall appearance of designed objects. As in the manual drafting of technical and engineering drawings, the output of CAD must convey information, such as materials, processes, dimensions, and tolerances, according to application-specific conventions.

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In this article, we will see the basic design consideration while designing a Multi-tenant web application in a simple manner. Though, many frameworks are available in the market to develop a multi - tenant application, but do they provide data, code portability, maintainability and platform agnosti
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On Demand Webinar: Networking for the Cloud Era
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On Demand Webinar: Networking for the Cloud Era

Did you know SD-WANs can improve network connectivity? Check out this webinar to learn how an SD-WAN simplified, one-click tool can help you migrate and manage data in the cloud.

The following article will describe how to add/edit a dimension style through AutoCAD VBA.

AutoCAD VBA has its quirks and when it comes to dimensions and controlling how they look through VBA.  This is where AutoCAD can be vividly confusing. The real trick is to understand a simple concept about dimension styles in AutoCAD. To use some home construction terms, they are not built “from the ground up”, they are "remodeled". That is to say, you have to start with everything already defined in a dimension style and then you change it to suit your needs. With that in mind, here is a quick snippet of how to create a new dimension style.

You first add a new dimension style to the drawing. It has all of its variables set by the current way the drawing is defined. You then alter the variables how you want them to be in your new dimension style and then "copy" them into your new dimension style. It is a simple concept but confusing if you are not aware of the quirk of "copying" these to your new dimension style. Keep in mind that the variables defined in the code are only a portion of the total number of dimension variables that exist. You will need to add or subtract the variables you wish to control in your dimension style.

This same concept is also how you alter the settings of an existing dimension style. The commented lines of code show how to alter an existing dimension style. Editing an existing dimension style requires the creation of a new dimension style first and …
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by:borgunit
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This comes up from time to time in other forums I participate in.
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If, like me, you find yourself repeatedly and tediously joining many segments (lines, arcs) in other people's drawings back into polylines that can be used more effectively in Computer Aided Machining and Laser Cutting, then this article is for you!

I have personally scoured the blogs for hours and hours, and given up ever having hope of finding an easy way to join segments into polylines. Finally, I found a solution that is both obvious and hidden. Obvious because you've probably seen it before. Hidden because you probably ignored it, like me and the seemingly hundreds of others who are stumped or who have settled for the limited capacity of the boundary function.

(Apparently the newest version of AutoCAD, 2011, actually gives you an indication as to why a "valid hatch boundary cannot be found," but this isn't a panacea for those of us who are stuck with older software because of the recession.)

If you're like me, early on you discovered the Boundary function. However, using boundary to create a polyline has it's limits, and frustratingly creates a polyline over existing lines so that one must still go behind and clean up after the leftover lines. This can be tedious, especially since the boundary function frequently only works on portions of the drawing.

When looking in blogs to solve another problem, I haphazardly came upon a solution to this problem posted in a thread that had gone hopelessly off topic.

Pedit> Multiple!

When you type in Pedit, notice …
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Our company has proprietary drawing files that we do not give to our customers for final documentation. Our customers now require that we give them these drawings. They understand that they are proprietary and do not require them to be in AutoCAD but still need to see them and have them with their title blocks in AutoCAD.

The method to accomplish this is to insert a raster image of our drawing file into the AutoCAD drawing. To do this and not have the path or the raster image as a separate file, I use a method that I found on the internet. I open the tif in a raster editor (I use Infanview because it is free and works great), and then select COPY and then in AutoCAD select PASTE SPECIAL. From this I select DEVICE INDEPENDENT BITMAP. It puts it in as a OLE object and the path is blown away. I tried copy and paste from Explorer and also inserting as an OLE object but those methods did not work.

One note. Even with this method, an issue arose with the image. After a save, the reopened file had a blank rectangle instead of the image. After many iterations of various settings, I think I have a fix.

I analyzed the TIF image we were using to paste in the drawing. When I viewed the properties, I noticed it was saved with GROUP 4 Fax Encoding and was 400 x 400 DPI. I found a TIF image that worked in another drawing its original size was A3 but the one that did not work was A0. Hmmm, It looked like a larger image size would mean more pixels (TWIPS) being used. I tried …
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Following a number of instances of re-installing Solidworks I thought that it may be a  good idea to detail the procedure that I follow each time to ensure a good stable install.

1. Backup



Backup your system.  It goes without saying that this is critical in case it all goes wrong.
I use Acronis True Image to take a Disk image of the machine before I do this.
Also make backup copies of all Solidworks Parts, Assemblies, Drawings, Templates, Library Features, Toolbox Data, etc. before you begin. Again, I would recommend making an image of the system to make sure you can access anything you need from the old system.

2. Local Admin and Anti Virus



Log on to the computer using a local admin account.  Permissions can cause issues so I would always recommend this.

Also, disable any Anti Virus Software.

3. Uninstall



Go To Add/Remove programs and Uninstall Solidworks and all other Solidworks components (Edrawings, dxf editor, etc.).

4. Reg Cleanup



Go to Start Menu > Run > type regedit to load the registry editor.

Back up the registry.

Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SOFTWARE and delete the Solidworks Folder.

Do the same in the HKEY_CURRENT_USER > SOFTWARE.

Download and run a registry cleaner such as CCleaner or similar.

5. System Cleanup



Go To C:\Program Files and C:\Program Files\Common Files.  If there are any Solidworks folders in …
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CAD/Architecture Software

Computer-aided design (CAD) is the use of computer systems to aid in the creation, modification, analysis, or optimization of a design. CAD output is often in the form of electronic files for print, machining, or other manufacturing operations. CAD software for mechanical design uses either vector-based graphics to depict the objects of traditional drafting, or may also produce raster graphics showing the overall appearance of designed objects. As in the manual drafting of technical and engineering drawings, the output of CAD must convey information, such as materials, processes, dimensions, and tolerances, according to application-specific conventions.

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