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A desktop computer is a personal computer designed for use at a single location due to its size and power requirements, usually by one person. The most common configuration has a case that houses the power supply, motherboard, disk storage (usually one or more hard disk drives and optical disc drives); a keyboard and mouse for input; and computer monitor and printer for output. The case may be oriented horizontally and placed atop a desk or vertically and placed underneath or beside a desk.

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Speed up a Slow Computer
There are many software programs on offer that will claim to magically speed up your computer. The best advice I can give you is to avoid them like the plague, because they will often cause far more problems than they solve. Try some of these "do it yourself" tips instead.
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by:Arkel Thompson
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Thank you very much, Andrew Leniart for that very informative and thorough article. Keep up the good work.
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by:Andrew Leniart
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You're very welcome Arkel and thank you for the compliment, I appreciate it.
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[Live Webinar] The Cloud Skills Gap
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[Live Webinar] The Cloud Skills Gap

As Cloud technologies come of age, business leaders grapple with the impact it has on their team's skills and the gap associated with the use of a cloud platform.

Join experts from 451 Research and Concerto Cloud Services on July 27th where we will examine fact and fiction.

Skype for Business
Skype is a P2P (Peer to Peer) instant messaging and VOIP (Voice over IP) service – as well as a whole lot more.
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I use more than 1 computer in my office for various reasons. Multiple keyboards and mice take up more than just extra space, they make working a little more complicated. Using one mouse and keyboard for all of my computers makes life easier. This combined with automation s/w makes my work a breeze.
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by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
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Here are several of the scripts to automate tasks in EndNote.  They currently work for me, but your mileage may vary.
backup.ahk
findrefupdates.ahk
import-file.ahk
savetextfromemail-with-clipboard.ahk
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vga cable
pc, laptop  monitor connection configurations
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by:Nadir ALTINBAS
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hi ericpete,
next time I will write current topics on ciphering algorithms.ok!
thnx,
-nadir
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Desktop
No matter the version of Windows you are using, you may have some problems with Windows Search running too slow or possibly not running at all. Before jumping into how you can solve this issue, just know there are many other viable alternative desktop search options out there.
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by:Jim Horn
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Nicely illustrated and reads very well.  Voted Yes.
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by:geolemon
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Great article - thanks!

I wish Microsoft would recognize the real problem they keep causing, however-

Despite ANYTHING I say, my girlfriend would rather dismiss the "Upgrade to Windows 10 for free!" notification in her task tray than actually upgrade, for fear that it'll break more than it improves...
...exactly things like this.

So also at a domestic level, thanks - this will help me avoid the "I told you so!" when I finally raise the nerve to convince her to pull the trigger on that upgrade.
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Library Card Catalog Drawer Search Concept
Windows 7 does not have the best desktop search built in. This is something Windows 7 users have struggled with. You type something in, and your search results don’t always match what you are looking for, or it doesn’t actually work at all. There are a couple of things you can do to try to improve t
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by:Kyle Santos
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Great job!
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by:Yashwant Vishwakarma
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Good One !!! Voted Yes !!! Thumbs Up !!!
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You have seen this as an option on your internet browser before or it may be completely new to you.  But what does this mean and why would I use this?
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Like many organizations, your foray into cloud computing may have started with an ancillary or security service, like email spam and virus protection. For some, the first or second step into the cloud was moving email off-premise. For others, a cloud-based CRM service was the first application in the cloud.

Currently, we see organizations rapidly moving file services and storage into cloud-based solutions as more marketing, sales, and line of business applications switch to Software-as-a-Service ("SaaS") solutions. Often, this leaves you with a small set of business applications running on-premise.

What do you do with applications and services left on-premise when most of your systems have moved, or will be moving, to the cloud?

While you may wish to keep these legacy systems on-premise, you can move them into a cloud or hosted Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) environment. VDI environments provide a virtualized, remote desktop accessible via browser or "receiver" app. When connected, users get their full desktop environment with access to local and network applications.

Some applications, such as computer-aided design (CAD) and manufacturing/process controls, are not well-suited for VDI. Most local and network applications work well within a VDI environment. VDI services typically charge based on processor load, memory, and allocated diskspace. Fees may also include standard office software, data backup services, malware protection, and other common …
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Computer running slow? Taking forever to open a folder, documents, or any programs that you didn't have an issue with before? Here are a few steps to help speed it up.

The programs mentioned below ALL have free versions, you can buy them if you want, but I suggest using the free version in this case.
 
Antivirus

First step is to check, and clean up, any viruses / malware you might have installed on your computer. Any good antivirus will help with this. There are many out there, if you don’t have any currently installed, you should do this right away. Many of the big names have free 30 day trials to find one you like. There are also many free ones, but they may only give you a quarter of the feature or not have real-time scanning as an option. The only downside is this could slightly slow your computer as it will be running in the background at all times. However, it is very important you have an antivirus program installed to help prevent you from becoming infecting and losing personal information.

Once installed run a full system scan and clean up any viruses it may find.

One suggested antivirus program to run is MalwareBytes found at (www.malwarebytes.org). Use the free version (this does not do real time scans unless you buy it. However it is free to do on demand scans for this case. However, I highly recommend buying a antivirus program from your favorite antivirus vendor (or do some research and pick which one is best for you).

 
AntiSpyware
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by:Rochelle Adsitt
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Also - ninite.com is a fabulous resource for installing the latest version of utilities and other software we've come to depend on (Adobe Reader, Flash, Java, Malwarebytes, etc.) cleanly and quickly. It installs the software for me and doesn't allow any of the extra junk (like toolbars) to get installed or enabled.
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by:gudii9
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CCleaner I mentioned above can be found at (https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner) use the free version

i installed and analyzed saw 9243 mb worth of files. now cleaning them.

when i open the windows explorer (windows key+E)it is closing by itself in few seconds saying 'windows enountered a problem..windows trying to find solution etc) not sure why
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How can this article save you time AND money?  In just a few minutes you may discover something you didn't know existed that is easy enough for you to fix yourself!
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by:Douglas Oerly
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There are other things that, I feel, should be mentioned here.

When removing unwanted or unused programs from your computer, the standard windows uninstaller frequently leaves files and registry entries that should have been removed.  This is also true for some 3rd party uninstallers.  One program that consistently removes everything, and gives you an option for uninstalling in safe, medium and advanced modes is the Revo uninstaller.  It will present a list(s) of left-over items and allow you to select the ones you want to remove.  Even Microsoft Help Desk personnel use this program when remotely working on someones pc.  It begins by using the standard uninstaller (either the software's own or windows) then collects left-over information and presents it to you.  Very user-friendly.  Left-over registry entries are included in items presented to remove.

You can go to the start menu and click or type run and a window will open.  Type in %temp% and click <ok>.  A window will be opened that presents a list of files.  Select all of them and delete them.  Some may be open and so just skip their deletion.

Go to your C:\ drive icon in My Computer or the file explorer and right click on it and run Disk Clean up.  Here, you can clean up system files as well, such as, windows log files, left-over windows update files, and others.

Additionally, just running the defragmentation program does not ensure that all files have been defragmented.  Go to the start menu or search programs and enter cmd and select the program.  A Command prompt window will appear that you may be familiar with if you have ever used the old DOS prompt, which is basically what this is.  Type in defrag ? and <ENTER>.  A list of defrag options will be presented that you can specify when you run the defrag command from this window.  Specify the ones you want and run the program.  NOTE: you may need to run this with administrator privileges.  Do this by right clicking the cmd prompt program and then click run as administrator.

Always remember, your computer may never become faster than it was when you first purchased it and opened the box.  If it was slow to start with, barring pre-installed software, it will usually be this slow to end with and you may need to just go ahead and purchase one with a faster processor etc.  One item that may make a difference here is more RAM.
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by:Les Finch
Comment Utility
The following comes from Wikipedia.
 "A myth has arisen that RDC significantly slows local file transfers and should be switched off; a Microsoft TechNet Web page by a Microsoft Directory Services Team member comprehensibly debunks this with detailed timings, additional to the fact that a service which is not invoked by software cannot have any effect, detrimental or otherwise"
 I did not find the TechNet page but would like to see Microsoft's comments on RDC.

I have found the most common causes of slow computers are
1- malware
2 - slow hard disks especially 2.5" drives. They do not report as faulty but the tests take an exceptionally long time to complete. We use Spinrite to test them
3 - as mentioned earlier, all the crap software the manufacturer has auto starting on boot. Ccleaner is great for disabling them.
4 - also mentioned earlier - not enough RAM
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The 5 R's

1. Repair
2. Restore
3. Reinstall
4. Remote admin
5. Run away

OK so I'm not the most skilled engineer around but I definitely have an abundance of experience: electronic repairs since I was 13 and PC and computer hardware repairs since 1997.

And by far the trickiest part of any engineer's day is when he or she is confronted with the dreaded question, "How long will it take?".  Thus bringing us to the point in time where you must admit that whereas you know it might take forever you are, however, forced to give and answer you know will be more pleasing.

Let us not forget that you are the engineer, the technician, the one who performs the repairs - you didn't go looking for it, it was handed to you.  Tell the truth.  Computer-based system repairs have no discernible timescales that can be adhered to nor can anyone predict with absolute certainty precisely how long it will take to identify a badly seated CPU or memory stick as the cause of a BSOD or that a scratched DVD/CD will cause "file not found" errors during a Windows installation routine.

You can, on the other hand, determine what your next course of action should be, and being able to identify that switching point gives you clear direction and a fair guess as to how long your next repair will take.

Point-in-fact: During my stint in commercial repairs for British Rail any item that took more than 4 hours to repair or that did not have a feasible repair option in said time - …
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Basic computer tune-up with little or no hardware upgrades.

Giving an old computer a tune-up usually results in a minimal performance gain, but a gain nonetheless. Several times a week, I’m faced with users at work who ask to make their computers ‘faster’. I’ll cover the steps that I take below in each of four categories.
( Although I’m the first to admit these are not the only steps someone can take to improve PC performance, they cover some basics. Much information is left out and this article is not really written for the technician who already knows most of this as well knows of other better alternatives/solutions)

Some of the main components controlling computer performance:
Processor, Video card/controller, Memory, Hard Drive, and operating system modifications( covering XP primarily).

Processor upgrades:
Out of the question for most computers and not realistic since this usually involves replacing the systemboard.

Videocard/controller upgrades:
Again, out of the question for most corporate desktop and almost all corporate/home laptop computers; but a possibility for some home desktop computer users who want to spend $50 to $200+ dollars for a video performance increase by buying a new videocard.

Memory upgrades:
The, currently, cheapest way to increase performance for older/newer computers. If you have the memory slots available and have the money, buy more memory! Windows XP 32bit is limited to …
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by:Danny Child
Comment Utility
Useful article, some very good points covered.
Only comment I'd make is that I don't think there's any point moving the swapfile to a separate partition UNLESS that partition is on a separate physical disk.  

If the disk controller (on the disk itself) is writing data *anywhere* on the disk, it will be just as busy, regardless of what partition it's writing to.  

Disks tend to be so large these days, it's not worth arguing about what size the swapfile will be either. Plain old Windows Default settings are fine by me.
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by:Rob Hutchinson
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Yep, good point, but was thinking "moving the swap file" was not to give better performance, but just to free up more space on the C drive; but you are right disks have changed--although with some of the SSD disks being 128G ...this is somewhat smaller than the current norm that people are use to.

You have to look at the article date too: this article is also over four years old...and a lot changes in four years too.
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Many people don't really know what the difference is between memory and storage. And most regular users don't understand the relationship between any of those fancy words printed on the front of their new computer. Of course, it's perfectly fine -- we are all experts at something, and we can't be experts at everything. Well, friends, I would like to share with you an easy-to-follow analogy that will make you grin from ear-to-ear. I guarantee you'll understand how a computer works after reading this article.

That big, square metal box is an office

If you were to take the cover off your PC, what would you see inside? A mass of wires and blinking things, perhaps? That's probably what many people might expect. Actually, imagine that metal case as an office. Inside are all the tools a worker needs to do their job. Now, that office is fairly worthless without you in it, right? Why? Because you are the one who's doing the work! Stick with me.

In your office, you have a desk where you do your work. You probably have a filing cabinet where you keep all of that work and information. You likely have various other things, too because they make your job just a little more pleasurable.

Inside your PC are parts whose terms you may have already heard of: RAM, or memory; hard drive; network card; and various other components. These components, like the things in your office, are the tools inside your computer's "office".  However, we'll only discuss the necessary items in …
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by:BillDL
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I love this sort of analogy.  I try to use this type of description myself in answering questions asked by people clearly not acquainted with certain aspects of hardware, software, etc, but your explanations are excellent.  That is exactly how computing courses should begin.

Your article now makes it clear to me "Why a faulty computer is like a government department".
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by:drdoug99
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Thumbs up from me too.....I use the same filing cabinet/desk analogy to explain what RAM and hard drive space is. Great job!
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Desktops

15K

Solutions

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Contributors

A desktop computer is a personal computer designed for use at a single location due to its size and power requirements, usually by one person. The most common configuration has a case that houses the power supply, motherboard, disk storage (usually one or more hard disk drives and optical disc drives); a keyboard and mouse for input; and computer monitor and printer for output. The case may be oriented horizontally and placed atop a desk or vertically and placed underneath or beside a desk.