Fonts Typography

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A font is a particular size, weight and style of a typeface. Each font is a matched set of type, one piece (called a "sort") for each glyph, and a typeface consists of a range of fonts that share an overall design. With the advent of digital typography, font is frequently synonymous with typeface, although the two terms do not necessarily mean the same thing. In particular, the use of "vector" or "outline" fonts means that different sizes of a typeface can be dynamically generated from one design. Each style may still be in a separate "font file" -- for instance, the typeface "Futura" may include the fonts "Futura roman", "Futura italic", "Futura bold" and "Futura extended" —- but the term "font" might be applied either to one of these alone or to the whole typeface.

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Fonts
Ever visit a website where you spotted a really cool looking Font, yet couldn't figure out which font family it belonged to, or how to get a copy of it for your own use? This article explains the process of doing exactly that, as well as showing how to install downloaded fonts.
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by:Brian B
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That is a really useful article, Andrew. Thanks for sharing.

A question though, back in the "old days" by my standards, you weren't supposed to share fonts because many of them were sold separately and were considered to be under the software license of the product they worked with. I would assume if you can get the font from Google that it is safe, but are there still instances of those IP fonts today that aren't supposed to be shared?
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by:Andrew Leniart
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Hi Brian,

An excellent observation. With regards to safety of available fonts, I can only assume that all submissions are checked by Google in this respect before a listing is accepted, so while never beyond the realms of possibility, am confident that a malicious font download is unlikely.

I'm sure there are many fonts to be found on the web which are not supposed to be shared as you've rightly pointed out, however with every font downloaded from the Google Fonts site, there is also a license agreement included within the downloaded Zip file that specifies which usage license the font has been released under.

In the case of the illustrated "Lato" font used in my example, that particular font has been released under the Sil Open Font License (OFL) and comes with the following conditions when downloaded.
PERMISSION & CONDITIONS
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of the Font Software, to use, study, copy, merge, embed, modify, redistribute, and sell modified and unmodified copies of the Font Software, subject to the following conditions,
The list of exclusions are as one would expect for most open source material, such as preventing the sale of the font by itself etc, however for personal or commercial use within other products, there's no problem.  This could differ of course with each font that's made available so it always pays to check what rights are provided. Font families not available on Google Fonts and found on other font distribution sites would of course contain their own rules and restrictions, which should always be respected.

I hope that answers your questions and thank you for your feedback and up-vote. I very much appreciate it. Regards, Andrew
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Fonts Typography

16K

Solutions

19K

Contributors

A font is a particular size, weight and style of a typeface. Each font is a matched set of type, one piece (called a "sort") for each glyph, and a typeface consists of a range of fonts that share an overall design. With the advent of digital typography, font is frequently synonymous with typeface, although the two terms do not necessarily mean the same thing. In particular, the use of "vector" or "outline" fonts means that different sizes of a typeface can be dynamically generated from one design. Each style may still be in a separate "font file" -- for instance, the typeface "Futura" may include the fonts "Futura roman", "Futura italic", "Futura bold" and "Futura extended" —- but the term "font" might be applied either to one of these alone or to the whole typeface.

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Fonts Typography