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GIS/GPS Programming

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a space-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) that provides reliable location and time information in all weather and at all times and anywhere on or near the Earth when and where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites. A geographic information system (GIS) or geospatial information system is any system that captures, stores, analyzes, manages, and presents data that are linked to location(s). In the simplest terms, GIS is the merging of cartography, statistical analysis, and database technology.

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Introduction

This article is designed to assist GIS (Geographic Information System) and GPS (Global Positioning System) developers using ESRI ArcGIS and other spatial information management systems.  

For the uninitiated the concept of projections and their use in GIS can be a confusing subject area, especially when raster and vector data types fail to align.  Projections are simply mathematical transformations that enable representation of 3D coordinate systems into 2D coordinate systems.  

In relation to GIS and mapping this takes data managed in latitude and longitude and converts it to a more usable resource, such as a flat map which aims to accurately represent shape and area.  Essentially the degrees based system of measurement is commonly migrated to a metric system such as metres. This enables you to effectively navigate terrain, or in the case of GIS, enable you to align raster and vector data or capture point, line and polygon features.

The Lamberts Conformal Conic projection

The Lamberts Conformal Conic (LCC) projection  system was developed in the 18th century by a swiss mathematician named Johann Heinrich Lambert.   The formulas behind the transformation would be interesting to some, but is not the primary focus of this article.  What is important here is how we can implement this projection to improve spatial data management productivity.  

Datums, spheroids and zone based data management

Often data is …
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by:ddurgaprasad
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Thanks much.Very good article.Useful to me .
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I feel like more and more people want to know how to programmatically convert addresses into geospatial locations. So in this article, I will show you how you can do it with Bing Maps. I'm going to use PowerShell, which is a nice scripting language, but you can easily transform the information here into your programming language of choice.

I've written about this stuff before on my blog at http://sqlblog.com/blogs/rob_farley/archive/2010/05/23/fetching-latitude-and-longitude-co-ordinates-for-addresses-using-powershell.aspx, but articles here are a lot more accessible for EE users.

The first thing to do is register for an account at http://www.bingmapsportal.com - the price will depend on what you want to do with the data, and many uses are free. Once registered, you'll get a Key. This key is what you'll use as a Credential in the Bing Maps Silverlight control, and you'll also use it for accessing the web service for Geocoding.

Yes, I said web service. That's how we do it.

In PowerShell, I'm going to use:
$ws = New-WebServiceProxy -uri http://dev.virtualearth.net/webservices/v1/geocodeservice/geocodeservice.svc?wsdl;

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...and that URI is what you can use from within Visual Studio, or whatever other system you choose.

If you look at the look at the generated web service proxy, you'll notice that one of the available operations is called Geocode(), and that it takes a GeocodeRequest object as a parameter. In PowerShell I can create that using:

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GIS/GPS Programming

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a space-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) that provides reliable location and time information in all weather and at all times and anywhere on or near the Earth when and where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites. A geographic information system (GIS) or geospatial information system is any system that captures, stores, analyzes, manages, and presents data that are linked to location(s). In the simplest terms, GIS is the merging of cartography, statistical analysis, and database technology.