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HTML (HyperText Markup Language) is the main markup language for creating web pages and other information to be displayed in a web browser, providing both the structure and content for what is sent from a web server through the use of tags. The current implementation of the HTML specification is HTML5.

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Originally, this post was published on Monitis Blog, you can check it here.



In business circles, we sometimes hear that today is the “age of the customer.” And so it is. Thanks to the enormous advances over the past few years in consumer technologies such as mobile and social media, customers are the ones who “shop with their voice” so to speak. The world of blog, forums, and numerous other social media channels over the past decade have provided consumers with unheard of power to determine their choice of products, brands, and services. Because of this power customer expectations have also gone through the roof. Continuing advances in technology, along with the “consumerization of IT,” has meant that companies are now expected to offer real-time, 24/7 service to meet the demands of mobile savvy customers.

 

Today, it’s all about meeting the customer needs and getting them to buy your products. And in order to do so, companies need to ensure their applications and websites are in tip-top shape. Customers simply will not have any patience for a website or application that is error prone or buggy or one that takes forever to load. This is why website performance and application monitoring is so central to your business strategy.

 

We talk about this subject a lot because it’s really so critical to the bottom-line of a business. And it’s even becoming more incumbent today as the demands of new technologies like the Internet of Things and wearables mean that customers are interacting with companies and their products through more endpoints than ever before. All of these channels require performance monitoring to ensure that things run as efficiently and optimally as possible. At the end of the day, web performance is really about keeping the customers happy.

 

In what follows, we want to do a reality check by discussing 7 “sure fire” ways to improve your web performance and make sure your customers keep coming back. After all, your business ROI really depends on it!

 

1. Keep Things Fast!

 

Research shows a clear relationship between web load speed and customer conversions. The faster a page loads the more likely customers will be to visit and do business on your site. The inverse is also true. The slower a page the less likely customers will be willing to wait around and engage with your brand. While this seems fairly straightforward, it’s surprising how few business owners really get the importance of website performance and the role it plays in their business strategy. It might be nice to have a trendy looking website, but if it takes 10 seconds to load visitors won’t hang around long enough to appreciate all the bells and whistles anyway.

 

 

2. Make Your Central Message Crystal Clear

 

From the moment visitors hit your page you want to give them a clear reason for why they should stick around. To do this you need to deliver your central message as quickly, clearly, and convincingly as possible. Don’t make your home page so convoluted that folks don’t know what action to take. Use large font, go generous on the content, and create clear pathways to the channels they need to purchase your product . . . period, end of story.


3. Give Visitors a Reason to Return

 

So you’ve got some visitors, now what? Well, that’s only half the battle. Studies show that most will not purchase on the first visit. So you need to give visitors a solid reason to return to your website. Do this by providing them with something useful, something they can’t refuse. Provide practical articles, a regularly updated blog, a newsfeed, or other user-generated content . . . anything that will engage your visitors and provide them with something of value.

 

4. Check Your Web Hosting

 

When reviewing web performance one of the first things to check is your web hosting service. It’s surprising how many times this gets overlooked. Even though your provider may offer you unlimited bandwidth, does that mean shared service with other sites that end up affecting your own web performance? Are you frequently experiencing downtime or bandwidth issues? If so, it’s worthwhile to review your hosting options to ensure you’re getting the most efficient service. Don’t be afraid to insist on 99.99% uptime.

 

5. Use Web Analytics & Gather Metrics

 

To some, this sounds like a well-worn cliché by now, but it needs to be drilled in more and more. If you’re not tracking the behavior of your visitors with metrics then you’re leaving money on the table. There are many web analytics tools on the market today that can help you closely monitor your customer’s online behaviors. The ability to track a single customer across your site and across multiple devices will ensure that you can tailor your brand to their needs. For instance, you want to learn more about when and where they’re visiting from, what devices they’re using, what are their online activities, and other key demographics such as age. Gaining these insights will help your organization better understand what’s important to your visitors and how to personalize their experience.

 

6. Take It Easy on Design ‘Best Practices’

 

Increasing the size of your website images, third-party scripts, and style sheets come with a heavy price and can adversely affect performance. This is especially true in the world of mobile. Over 50% of all time consumers spend on retails site is on mobile devices and more than 50% of consumers multiscreen during the purchasing. According to this slide deck, some of the worst practices are web pages that are initially blank and then populate, pages where the call to action is the last thing to render, popups that block the rest of the page, and designing and testing in a way that the user experience is completely overlooked.

 

7. Adopt Cloud-Based Website Monitoring

 

There are significant advantages to offloading your website monitoring to a cloud-based host – cost, scalability, efficiency, to name a few. Not to mention, this frees you up to focus on growing your business, which matters the most anyway.

 

If you’d like to get onboard with the latest in cloud-based monitoring then you should try a 24/7 monitoring service like Monitis. With its first-class global service, Monitis allows organizations to monitor their network anytime and from anywhere. For instance, with Monitis you can load test your website to determine at what point it starts creating traffic issues. They’ll also send you timely alerts by every possible means (live phone messages, text, email, Twitter, etc.) to keep you apprised about your site performance. If your web hosting services go down then Monitis will be first to let you know.

 

When it comes to monitoring your website, you don’t want to shortchange yourself. Get the peace of mind you deserve by entrusting your business to a proven industry leader. Go to Monitis and sign up for a free trial today and let them help boost your bottom-line. You’ll be glad you did!

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Originally, this post was published on Monitis Blog, you can check it here.


Websites are getting bigger and more complicated by the day. Video, images and custom fonts are all great for showcasing your product or service. But the price to pay in terms of reduced page load times and ultimately, decreased sales, could lead to some difficult decisions about what to cut.

 

Web loads speeds are integral factors in determining your SEO and how long customers will stay at your site. But web design, as important as it is for driving traffic, can also get in the way of your ultimate goal of bringing customers and revenue. In other words, you must avoid page bloat at all costs!

 

This is why businesses today, more than ever, must develop a clearly defined web performance optimization strategy. In fact, web monitoring should be an integral part of your web design best practices. To be clear, web performance optimization (or WPO) is the science of making your website perform better so it increases visitor retention, improves SEO, and drives more sales.


To give a great case study of how WPO works, consider what 37signals (now Basecamp) did with their Highrise marketing website. Using A/B testing, the company did multiple tests to determine the best plan for their landing page. In one case, the original background was white and cluttered with information. A dramatic change was made by replacing this white background with a picture of a person smiling.

 

The new landing page led to an increase in signups at the Highrise site by 102.5%!

 

This list provides another 99 great case studies of how WPO made a huge difference in website conversions.

 

In what follows, we take things further by providing you a brief checklist of the key steps to ensuring your website performance optimization strategy is on track.



Keep Things Fast! 

Website conversions are integrally tied to the speed of the site. One second saved in download time can make all the difference between a sale or a bounce.


  

Check Your Web Hosting 

Your web hosting may offer “unlimited bandwidth” but if it involves shared services with other websites that impacts overall performance, then is it really worth it? It’s always a good idea to periodically review your hosting plan to ensure you’re getting the best value for your dollar.

  


Make Your Site Mobile First

Having a “mobile first” website is critical to success in today’s digital marketplace. If you don’t believe it, just consider that mobile commerce transactions in the United States alone are expected to total $123 billion in 2016

  


Image Optimization 

“Page bloat” – or the practice of cramming websites with high density images – has gotten out of hand and is the number one culprit for long page loading times. Don’t bloat your website! One of the best ways to ensure proper image optimization is to adopt correct sizing and formatting for all your images.

  


Go Easy with Affiliate Codes & Ads  

Ads and affiliate code are good . . . up to a point! But when you go overboard, this can lead to high bounce rates and can adversely impact your overall website performance. Constantly check how third-party applications impact your load speed! 

 


Cache Often 

Caching is a mechanism for the temporary storage of web pages in order to reduce bandwidth and improve performance. This saves server time and makes your website faster overall.

  


Use a CDN 

Content Delivery Networks deliver the static files of a website, like CSS, images, and JavaScript, through servers that are in closer proximity to the user’s physical location. Every second that you save in download time is dollars in your pocket.

  


Make Your CTA Front & Center 

Don’t make your landing page a game of “guess where to check-out the merchandise.” Visitors don’t want to spend extra time trying to figure out where to complete their transactions. Your Call to Action should be front and center on the landing page.



Adopt Cloud-based Website Monitoring 

Imagine having all of the vital statistics for your website in a nice convenient dashboard, and getting alerts about trouble spots long before they reach impact your customers. Cloud hosted web monitoring is the crucial component in today’s digital marketplace. IT system monitoring is first of all a real time data that can help you respond to problems. You cannot do without monitoring tools, if you hope to optimize and maximize your application’s performance.



Sign up for Monitis FREE 15-day full-featured trial! Premium plan starting from $12/month only! 

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context sensitive help

When it comes to write a Context Sensitive Help (an online help that is obtained from a specific point in state of software to provide help with that state)first we need to make the file that contains all topics, which are given exclusive IDs. Later on, the header file lists symbolic IDs and Numeric IDs for control and dialog boxes in the program. However, before you start writing, you need to take note of following points:

 

  • Depending on the program, you can compile hundreds or thousands of topics. If you succeed to develop a good tracking system, it will safe to talk with software developers or test the files
  • In case you use an IDH as prefix for the topic ID. HTML help workshop will automatically check the topics in project actual exits in the compiled help file. It will also ensure that the context sensitive topics are made in project file
  • You have to make sure the develop maps assists to add labels and controls in dialog box.  Users can just click on control in dialog box  including button or text box to get help while others just click on label for control, therefore you may want same help topic to appear in both situations
  • If there are more than one item in a group box, you need to separate help topics for each item. Doing this lets you assign group box a generic topic that tells user to click each and every item in-group for relative information. If there is only one item in-group box label, related the group box label with topic of item
  • You can map a topic ID to a number. However, numeric values defined in help file needs to be irreplaceable. You can specify numeric values in decimal and hexadecimal format. The software develop can develop mapping for you in head file

With the given basic guidelines for creating context help, we will help you understand it better. Yes, we are giving you an example of how to create a Context Sensitive Popup Help.


Creating Pop Up Help

Context-Sensitive-Help.jpgThe Context sensitive helps lets the user to find information about a specific user interface element. The pop up help appears in a pop up window instead of help viewer, this example is just a four step process which details how to creative context sensitive help pop up.

To suffice, you better make a text file for the header file and help topics so you can add them in the project file

  • Your text file should enlist important topics curated for pop up help; each topic id in text file needs to match a symbolic ID in header file
  • Header file has the numeric and symbolic Id for all dialog box and respective commands in the program. The software development team should provide a list of ID for the Header file
    opentexthelp-graphic-en.jpg

Making the Text File for Pop up on Help Topics

 

  1. First Open the HTML Help Workshop
  2. in File menu, click on New and then click on Text
  3. Create an entry point for each pop up help topic and use the following format:
  4. . topic <i>topic ID</i>
    <i>help topic</i>
  5. in here, “topic ID” is  symbolic ID of a dialog box control where “helptopic” is help text for control
  6. Save the File
     

Creating the Header File

 

  • Open Notepad
  • Create specified entries for every symbolic ID, this is followed by the equivalent numeric ID which uses the following format
  • #define IDH_symbolicID 1000
  • in here, the “symbolicID” is symbolic ID for part of program (including dialog box or control) and “1000” is numeric ID. The Numeric ID in header file are used only by HTML help compiler as it maps numeric ID in header file to help topics
  • when done, save the context sensitive help Header file with a.h extension
    145.png

Create [Text Popups] segment in Project file

 

  • Open a project file and click on HTML Help API Information
  • On Text Pop Ups, click on Header File and locate the header file which you previously create and Click Ok
  • Save the Project when Done
     

Add  the Header file into your Project File

  • Exposed Project file and click on HTML Help API Information
  • On Map Tab, Click the Header File
  • Locate the Header file that you want to add
  • Save your Project
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When crafting your “Why Us” page, there are a plethora of pitfalls to avoid. Follow these five tips, and you’ll be well on your way to creating an effective page.
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computer code editor
Today, the web development industry is booming, and many people consider it to be their vocation. The question you may be asking yourself is – how do I become a web developer?
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by:Brandon Lyon
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Good article.

Angular JS is one of many options for learning javascript display+controller logic. If someone is trying to learn Angular but is struggling to understand then they might want to try another framework like React, Riot, Ember, Polymer, Vue, or Meteor. I had a really hard time following Angular but had a much easier time learning React, Polymer, and Meteor. Learning at least one js framework will give you an idea of how to work with the others and how to structure larger or more complex applications.
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by:Gina Lofaro
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Well bless your cotton socks, Ryan! Thank goodness someone else can do the jobs I can't fathom. I've been writing websites for clients for 11 years and I like to stick to my lane (writing quality copy). The thought of trying to code/design/build a website does my head in. We all have our strengths, don't we? For me, it's words ... not graphics, not design, not accounting. I know from working with you that your level of service is outstanding so there's no question about you being a "successful web developer"! I enjoyed your post (even if it did make my head spin a bit)!
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The article shows the basic steps of integrating an HTML theme template into an ASP.NET MVC project
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outlook 2007
Finding original email is quite difficult due to their duplicates. From this article, you will come to know why multiple duplicates of same emails appear and how to delete duplicate emails from Outlook securely and instantly while vital emails remain intact.
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by:Clark Kent
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Hello dear,

Its not like that, the methods (Try Account Setting and Use Import and Export Option) you have shared are different from mine. And besides these two methods, there are two more methods in my article which are as follows:

1. Modifying ‘View’ settings in Outlook to remove duplicates
2. Use Outlook's Clean Up Tool

which are really helpful to remove Outlook duplicate emails.

Regards,
Clark Kent
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by:james snow
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Hello
 Manual techniques mentioned above are the best wy to remove Outlook's Duplicates.I tried all the manual techniques to remove Outlook's duplicates, But unfortunately, i could remove only a few duplicates outlook's files as there are lots of PST files and damn big attachment in my Outlook  and
So, left with no choice I used SysInfo Outlook duplicate Remover. With this tool, I managed to remove all Duplicates in a single run.
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Find out what you should include to make the best professional email signature for your organization.
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Is your Office 365 signature not working the way you want it to? Are signature updates taking up too much of your time? Let's run through the most common problems that an IT administrator can encounter when dealing with Office 365 email signatures.
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On Demand Webinar - Networking for the Cloud Era
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On Demand Webinar - Networking for the Cloud Era

This webinar discusses:
-Common barriers companies experience when moving to the cloud
-How SD-WAN changes the way we look at networks
-Best practices customers should employ moving forward with cloud migration
-What happens behind the scenes of SteelConnect’s one-click button

This article explains how to prepare an HTML email signature template file containing dynamic placeholders for users' Azure AD data. Furthermore, it explains how to use this file to remotely set up a department-wide email signature policy in Office 365 via Windows PowerShell using Exchange Online tr
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This article demonstrates how to create a simple responsive confirmation dialog with Ok and Cancel buttons using HTML, CSS, jQuery and Promises
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This article discusses how to create an extensible mechanism for linked drop downs.
0
Image Overlay
This article discusses four methods for overlaying images in a container on a web page
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Not sure what the best email signature size is? Are you worried about email signature image size? Follow this best practice guide.
1
Building a website can seem like a daunting task to the uninitiated but it really only requires knowledge of two basic languages: HTML and CSS.
1
This article describes how to create custom column layout styles for Bootstrap. The article uses 5 columns to illustrate the concept, but the principle can be extended to any number of columns.
1
powershell web interface image01
This is a PowerShell web interface I use to manage some task as a network administrator. Clicking an action button on the left frame will display a form in the middle frame to input some data in textboxes, process this data in PowerShell and display some results in bottom frame.
1
 
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by:Serge Fournier
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Bug in windows 10
I had to add ID tags on the invisibles buttons. The name was not used as ID in windows 10.
Line 184 (for lefct frame)
        $h = "<input type=""hidden"" id=""" + $arabutnam[$i] + """ name=""" + $arabutnam[$i] + """ value=""0"">"
Line 271
$h+= "<input type=""hidden"" id=""" + $element + """ name=""" + $element + """ value=""0"">"
0
Have you tried to learn about Unicode, UTF-8, and multibyte text encoding and all the articles are just too "academic" or too technical? This article aims to make the whole topic easy for just about anyone to understand.
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by:Brandon Lyon
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Thanks for the info
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by:evilrix
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Nice article!

I'm one of those poor souls who has to write cross-platform C++ code and the headaches involved in getting Unicode encoding working in a cross platform way is a nightmare. In general, we stick to UTF8 right up until we hit the system functions. On *nix platforms UTF8 works fine, on Windows one has to convert to UTF16. It's a bit of a pain, because there is a little inefficiency in doing this but it's normally not enough to cause concern.

What doesn't help is the fact Microsoft continuously refer to UTF16 as Unicode and anything else as ANSI. This has confused a lot of Windows programmers into thinking if it's a 16 bit data type it must be Unicode and if it's an 8 bit data type it's not. Ironically, Windows has no native support for UTF8 at the API level, even though it does have a UTF8 code page! I wish someone would welcome Microsoft into the 21st Century :)

UTF8 is really the only portable encoding format and for my money it's the encoding format I'd go for every time. Anyone interested in Unicode transformation and encoding, either because they are an engineer or they are a masochist, should also find the following resource really very useful and a nice compliment to this well written article.

http://utf8everywhere.org/

Thanks, Gonzo.
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Enroll in July's Course of the Month
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Enroll in July's Course of the Month

July's Course of the Month is now available! Enroll to learn HTML5 and prepare for certification. It's free for Premium Members, Team Accounts, and Qualified Experts.

SASS
SASS allows you to treat your CSS code in a more OOP way. Let's have a look on how you can structure your code in order for it to be easily maintained and reused.
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SASS
Browsers only know CSS so your awesome SASS code needs to be translated into normal CSS. Here I'll try to explain what you should aim for in order to take full advantage of SASS.
1
SASS
Styling your websites can become very complex.
Here I'll show how SASS can help you better organize, maintain and reuse your CSS code.
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by:Alexandre Simões
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Thanks Marco,
let me know if after reading the three articles you still feel that something is missing.
It will sure come as a nice subject for a sequel on this series.

Cheers!
Alex
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by:Marco Gasi
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I f I'll have some idea I'll tell you for sure :-)
Cheers
Marco
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We will take a look at the d3.js library for visualizations.  I will provide a walkthrough of a short bar graph example as well as introduce you to the d3.js API.  We also will explore links of other examples and further information regarding SVG's.
3
In this article, we will look at our content management system as a whole, to get an idea of how we will start to manage these content items.
2
 

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by:dwarak besant
Comment Utility
Would you have any recommendations on how to make this add/edit blog entries instead of pages? I'm trying to just add blog functionality to a single page on a website without converting the entire site into a CMS.
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Introduction
If you're like most people, you have occasionally made a typographical error when you're entering information into an online form.  And to your consternation, the browser remembers the error, and offers to autocomplete your future entries by using the typographical error.  This is somewhat annoying, and if you're paying attention, you can visually identify the error.  You can usually get past this issue by telling the browser to forget your recent history.  But have you ever begun typing your password or passphrase into an online form and thought, "Did I get that right?"  You can't visually check your work because the browser is showing you a form input field with something like this: ········· The browser is "helpfully" hiding the password from prying eyes by masking the input control field.

This article teaches three ways to allow your clients to show or hide the password fields as they type them into your forms.  In my experience, the default behavior that hides the password input is only marginally useful.  Most of the time nobody is looking over your shoulder and the real risk of lost passwords does not rest with the human client or the client browser, but with the servers where passwords are stored.  We can't change the server's security, but we can choose to make life easier for our (human) clients!

How HTML <input type="password"> Works
HTML defines several different input types for different kinds of input controls
5

HTML

57K

Solutions

30K

Contributors

HTML (HyperText Markup Language) is the main markup language for creating web pages and other information to be displayed in a web browser, providing both the structure and content for what is sent from a web server through the use of tags. The current implementation of the HTML specification is HTML5.