Installation

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Installation is the act of making a computer program program ready for execution. Because the process varies programs often come with a specialized program responsible for doing whatever is needed for their installation. Installation may be part of a larger software deployment process. Cross platform installer builders that produce installers for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux include InstallAnywhere, InstallBuilder and Install4J. Installers for Microsoft Windows include Windows Installer, InstallShield, and Wise Installation Studio; free installer-authoring tools include NSIS, IzPack, Clickteam, InnoSetup, InstallSimple and WiX. Mac OS X includes Installer, and also includes a separate software updating application.

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Create a Windows 10 custom Image with custom task bar and custom start menu using XML for deployment.
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VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE
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VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

With User Account Control (UAC) enabled in Windows 7, one needs to open an elevated Command Prompt in order to run scripts under administrative privileges. Although the elevated Command Prompt accomplishes the task, the question How to run as script under elevated privileges/admin privileges
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dell monitor
Monitor input from a computer is usually nothing special.  In this instance it prevented anyone from using the computer.  This was a preconfiguration that didn't work.
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by:Josh Snow
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I had a somewhat similar situation. I built my computer, ordered parts off Newegg. Included was a nice graphics card, my first one. I kept fiddling with the monitor wondering why it wasn't displaying. After awhile, I realized the monitor was hooked to the mother board, instead it needed to be hooked to the new graphics card. lesson learned.
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If you don't know how to downgrade, my instructions below should be helpful.
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One of the most frequently asked questions on EE in the "Windows Installer" zone is how to eliminate self-triggered installation of some product.  The problem occurs when, suddenly, whenever a certain application is launched, or even when a folder is opened in Windows Explorer, a Windows Installer dialog comes up and begins to reinstall this product, or even another product. Why is this happening, and how do we get rid of it?

What we see here is the feature of Windows Installer called "resiliency". When an MSI-based installation occurs, besides putting in place files and creating registry entries, it also creates certain internal structures in Windows, with information about the required components of the product. After that, whenever such component is activated by any application, Windows first checks to see if the component is intact. If not, it launches a self-repair process, which is what appears on the screen.

A little FAQ on the topic is in order.

Q1: Who decides what components are "required", and what is "intact"?
A1: The author of the installation package. Quite often, he simply follows the wizard in his MSI-authoring product without giving full consideration to what is really required, what is not, what should stay intact and what should not. "Intact" means that the specified file or registry key does exist. The contents of the file or the value of the registry key is allowed to change, so if it is changed, this does not make the …
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by:waafist
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I've been looking for 5 hours, and this nailed it.  After uninstalling/reinstalling Office, uninstalling/reinstalling MSInstaller.  Thanks so much
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by:RGRodgers
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Oustanding article!  Thanks for this valuable information...RG
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I have been scripting applications way too long and can never remember how to create an ISS file.  So I decided to write this article to act as my own knowledge base for future reference, and hope you will also benefit.

An ISS file is a response file or unattended installation file used for installing any application software that supports ISS.  With an ISS file, the application can take advantage of features such as complete silent installation logging, and no user interaction.  

This is helpful when you want to make the install silent and deploy the installation to more than 100 users using Microsoft SMS/SCCM or Altiris.  It also saves time from having to repackage the application from scratch using Symantec Wise Studio or Flexera Admin Studio.  

In application packaging terminology, if the application was packaged with Install Shield, you can create an ISS file to make the install silent and automated without having to repackage the application into a new MSI format.  Keep in mind that Microsoft application will not use ISS because they already use MSI technology.  

ISS file installation usually works with vendors like IBM, Oracle, Sun, and any InstallShield type installation setup.  When you run an install by manually clicking on it and you see the InstallShield logo. Then there is a 75% chance that you can use an ISS file.

So the command line to record an installation to produce an ISS file is:
setup.exe -r -f1(path\response_file_name.iss)

The …
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Among others, I monitor the Windows Installer zone and Installer zone.

I find that many of the questions could be answered much more quickly if a Windows Installer verbose log were submitted with the question.  

However, I do not always have the time to explain how to do this in each thread, so I thought I would explain it in an article.

In fact, you may be reading this because I referenced you here from a question you asked.

I hope you take the time to generate the Windows Installer log because it can easily eliminate days of back and forth on a question you have posted.

Why Take The Time To Generate a Windows Installer Log?
Windows Installer logging is very exhaustive.  In fact, in full verbose mode it differs very little from the programmers debug log that Microsoft developers would use to debug the Windows Installer service.

The effect of this is that almost any problem can be determined by examining a Windows Installer log - with no need to re-run an exact test scenario and be at the machine in question.

Windows Installer logging can be controlled either by a group policy registry key or on the command line.

Logging From the Command Line
The command line is appropriate when you can run a command line in the EXACT same context that the problem package is running.  For instance, a login script processes just like running msiexec.exe manually for the same user.   However, a package running through your software …
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by:cmdman
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Got the log showing. Don't know what to do next. Please help if possible.
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Installations often have prerequisites, such as “Microsoft .Net framework is required for this product”. The usual implementation in MSI installations is system search for a particular registry setting representing the required prerequisite, followed by a launch condition based on the result of the system search (passed in a property).

This works well for the whole product; but if the product has several features, it may be that different features have different requirements, so it would be an overkill to request, for example, .Net Framework for the whole product when in fact only one its feature needs it - especially if that feature is optional and is installed only for the users who specifically request it. How to implement this?

I came up with the following solution. We still use system search to detect if prerequisite is met; but now we don’t use launch condition. Instead, we use the events generated by Selection Tree control in the Select Feature dialog.

The events documented by Selection Tree control are documented in the Microsoft article¹ about it. For our purpose, we need two: MsiSelectionTreeSelectedFeature and MsiSelectionTreeSelectedAction , returning accordingly the current feature selected by the user in the control, and target installation state of it specified by the user.

Assuming that the feature that needs the prerequisite is named OptionalFeature, we specify two following events as Published by Selection Tree control:

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One of the major drawbacks of deploying applications by GPO is the complete lack of any centralized reporting. After a normal deployment, there are two ways to find out if it was successful – by looking in the event log, and by looking in the log of the installation package itself, provided that it was enabled by group policy. Obviously, this is a major drawback.

Deployment systems like SMS provide reporting by means of their agent deployed at each workstation. The agent launches the installation, watches it, and then reports a return code to the central server where it can then be analyzed.

There is however another way to provide the reporting – by inserting custom actions in the installation script, by modifying the MSI package. In this article, we will illustrate how to build such a reporting system by using a transform, applied to the installation package.

The actions we insert will be reporting the state of the installation to our database. We will need 3 actions – one in the beginning to report the installation start; and two in the end to report installation success or failure.

For starters, we will need the database table to report to. In this article, we will be using SQL Server, but of course it can be any database – you just need to modify the connection string for your system.  The below SQL procedure will create the table we need.

 
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[_GPOInstallations]

(id] [int] IDENTITY (1, 1) NOT NULL ,
            [machine] [varchar] 

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by:RobSampson
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Vadimrapp1, this is a good article!  It provides a great alternative approach for those administrators that wish to gain meaningful reporting on the status of their application deployments.

Thanks.

Regards,

Rob.
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One of the frequent problems with the installations is when some file or registry entry is not removed from the system upon un-installation of the product. Clean removal is always highly desirable.

One major reason for that is badly authored installation, and especially, when installation author tries to change the logic of Installer by putting in various conditions, custom actions, and such. This is practically always bad idea.

Installer itself takes into account very big number of various deployment scenarios, such as advertising, managed installations, assigned installations, roaming profiles, running on terminal server, and more; the author in his efforts usually only considers the most obvious and straightforward scenario, which is practically the guarantee of problems whenever any other scenario is encountered.

Funny enough, Microsoft itself is good example of these practices - and the result is easy to see by checking out long articles with the names "How to remove <insert product name here>". Other companies create separate utilities to remove their products - Nero and Nvidia come to mind. Properly authored installation does not require special efforts to remove it.

The remedy lies in two basic principles.

First: don't create custom actions when it's not absolutely necessary. Remember, every custom action is essentially a black box for Installer, and unlike standard actions, everything your custom action does, if only your own …
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Installation

9K

Solutions

12K

Contributors

Installation is the act of making a computer program program ready for execution. Because the process varies programs often come with a specialized program responsible for doing whatever is needed for their installation. Installation may be part of a larger software deployment process. Cross platform installer builders that produce installers for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux include InstallAnywhere, InstallBuilder and Install4J. Installers for Microsoft Windows include Windows Installer, InstallShield, and Wise Installation Studio; free installer-authoring tools include NSIS, IzPack, Clickteam, InnoSetup, InstallSimple and WiX. Mac OS X includes Installer, and also includes a separate software updating application.