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LXC is an operating system-level virtualization method for running multiple isolated Linux systems (containers) on a single control host. LXC provides operating system-level virtualization by providing a virtual environment that has its own process and network space. LXC relies on the Linux kernel cgroups functionality. LXC is similar to other OS-level virtualization technologies on Linux such as OpenVZ and Linux-VServer, as well as those on other operating systems such as FreeBSD.

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Linux containers are abbreviated as LXC. They are the forms of lightweight operating system level virtualization for computers that are running Linux. Containers do not provide the virtual machine but provide a virtual environment where the containers share the same operating system as the host.

This is accomplished with some key features:
  1. Chroot
  2. Namespaces
  3. Cgroups
These features create an environment that allowd the running of multiple containers concurrently on the same host. The idea behind a container is to implement a technology that would enable separate processes to run together without the requirement of any other operating system or hypervisor applications. Containers share the same kernel with anything else that is running on it, but they can have constraints on the usage of resources like CPU, memory, hard drive or I/O. This Linux feature has been out in the version 2.6.24 of the operating system.

Concept behind the Implementation of Linux Containers

Containers are considered a better alternative to the traditional hypervisors like ESXi, Xen and so on. The hypervisor is an emulated hardware for the virtual machine and on the top of these virtual machines. Users used to have memory and applications. With the help of a hypervisor, you can have multiple virtual machines on a physical server. It is effectively like virtualizing a system at the hardware level.

If you want to have multiple …
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by:Temody
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by:SHARANAPPA BANAKARA
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nice article...yes definitely replacement for esx hyper visor.
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Virtual Machine and Containers are both techniques for virtualization and in many scenario either can be used. Though Virtual Machine and Container are similar in many ways, they both have there own space and can coexist in the same ecosystem. 

Virtual Machines utilize a concept called “Virtualization” to utilize resources on a machine to create one or virtual machines running its own operating systems. The primary machine is often referred as “Host” and virtual machines as “Guest”. These virtual machines are created by the virtualization software like VirtualBox or Vmware by intercepting access to certain hardware components and certain features from the host machine.

Containers utilize operating-system-level virtualization method. It requires OS kernel support which allows multiple isolated user space instances sharing host operating system resources. These instances are often called containers. LXC provides container support for Linux and very recently Microsoft announces container support for Windows ecosystem via Windows Server Containers. Docker is an open platform to build, ship, and run distributed applications as containers.
Though Virtual Machine and Containers are both virtualization …
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This article is a product of a couple of things, the first part comes from research I gathered during a masters course on Leading Change and Innovation and the second part is just my nerdy interest in computer technology, in particular VMware virtualization and Unix/Linux.

Trip down virtual memory lane

How quickly we forget what an undertaking this was to do for VMware’s founders. Sure virtualization had been around before, but only for mainframe systems and no one ever thought or even asked for virtualization for the cheaper x86 platforms. In the late 90s, PCs were manufactured by many different vendors, with different components. The task of virtualizing x86 was a complex problem and took a lot of work, and by 1999 we were introduced to VMware Workstation.

I remember, it was like magic and we were in awe of of VMware’s innovations with Workstation. It was novel and both system administrators and developers geeked out on what they could do with the the hosted system. I learned their VI3 (Virtual Infrastructure 3) technology in 2007 and lost my mind over it. vMotion was just about the sexiest thing I'd ever seen and I am happy to have been able to learn vmfs and the intracacies of virtual machine files and how everything worked across ESX hosts. It was a beautiful thing to me.

This is all ancient history today and virtualization for x86 is considered a commodity. There are tons of open source and hyper converged solutions, which is great for IT admins …
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LXC

9

Solutions

3

Articles & Videos

17

Contributors

LXC is an operating system-level virtualization method for running multiple isolated Linux systems (containers) on a single control host. LXC provides operating system-level virtualization by providing a virtual environment that has its own process and network space. LXC relies on the Linux kernel cgroups functionality. LXC is similar to other OS-level virtualization technologies on Linux such as OpenVZ and Linux-VServer, as well as those on other operating systems such as FreeBSD.

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