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How to Identify Fonts on a website and download them.
If you’ve ever visited a web page and noticed a cool font that you really liked the look of, but couldn’t figure out which font it was so that you could use it for your own work, then this video is for you!

In this Micro Tutorial, you'll learn you how to quickly and easily identify fonts that are used on any web page you visit, as well as how to download those fonts from Google’s fonts collection site with a couple of mouse clicks, so long as Google has them available.

The video also covers how to install downloaded fonts into Windows so that they can be used in any text editing software you have that allows you to select different fonts.

I plan to also write an illustrated article tutorial on this topic, so if you prefer reading and viewing screen shots as opposed to video learning, then head over to my article How to Identify Fonts on a website and download them.

Please enjoy the video..

1. (00:33) Install the Fount Java Script button into your browser

Browse over to FOUNT in your browser and follow the instructions on the page to install the the free "fount" button.

2. (01:03) Identify the Font you're interested in

On any web page containing the font you're interested in, click your newly installed fount button and then click on the font text you want to identify

3. (01:40) Click the Google Fonts link if available

If the View fonts on Google Fonts link becomes available to you, then Google has a copy of the font available for download. Click the link to be taken to the font download area. If the link is not there, then you will need to do a manual search to find out where you can obtain the font elsewhere.

4. (01:50) Download the Font from Google Fonts

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Important Lessons on Recovering from Petya
LVL 11
Important Lessons on Recovering from Petya

In their most recent webinar, Skyport Systems explores ways to isolate and protect critical databases to keep the core of your company safe from harm.

Building Probability Models in Excel Part 7: Modeling a Correlated Two-Fund Investment
The viewer will learn how to create two correlated normally distributed random variables in Excel, use a normal distribution to simulate the return on different levels of investment in each of the two funds over a period of ten years, and, create a Monte Carlo simulation using the simulated returns.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the means and standard deviations of the return of both of the funds, along with the correlation coefficient

2. Select B7:C7 and type =CORAND($B$5), then press Command+Shift+Enter

3. Copy down to row 16

4. Label the returns of fund 1 and fund 2

5. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(B7,$B$2,$B$3)) into cell E7 and copy down to E16

6. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(C7,$C$2,$C$3)) into cell F7 and copy down to F16

7. Label the $1 investment into fund 1 and fund 2

8. Enter =H6*E7 into cell H7 and =I6*F7 into cell I7 then copy both down to row 16

9. Enter =H16 into cell B25 and =I16 into cell C25

10. Select A25:C524 then click ToolsSimToolsSimulation Table


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Expert Comment

by:Richard Shaw
In the SIM table (A25: A524) -- what is the meaning and use of the column A data?
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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 6: Investment Modeling Using a Log-Normal Distritribution
The viewer will learn how to create a normally distributed random variable in Excel, use a normal distribution to simulate the return on an investment over a period of years, Create a Monte Carlo simulation using a normal random variable, and calculate the 5% Value at Risk of the investment from the results.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the mean and standard deviation of possible returns

2. Label column A “Return” in cell A5

3. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(RAND(),$B$2,$B$3) into cell A6 and copy down to cell A15

4. Enter 1 into cell B5 to represent $1 invested

5. Enter =B5*A6 into cell B6 and copy down to cell B15

6. Enter =B15 into cell B20

7. Select A20:B519

8. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

9. Enter 1000 into cell B17 and label “Initial”

10. Enter =$B$17*B21 into cell C21 and copy down to cell C519

11. Enter =PERCENTILE(B20:B519,0.05) into cell B18 and label 5% VaR

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 5: Modeling an Investment Using Discrete Random Variables
The viewer will learn how to use a discrete random variable to simulate the return on an investment over a period of years, create a Monte Carlo simulation using the discrete random variable, and create a graph to represent the possible returns over 500 iterations.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the amount invested, the possible returns, and the corresponding probabilities

2. Label column A and B “Return” and “Wealth,” respectively in A11 and B10

3. Enter =DISCRINV(RAND(),$B$2:$B$7,$A$2:$A$7) into cell A12 and copy down to cell A21

4. Enter =D2 into cell B11

5. Enter =B11*A12 into cell B12 and copy down to cell B21

6. Create a Monte Carlo Simulation: Enter =B21 into cell B23

7. Enter =B21 into cell B23

8. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 4: Discrete Random Variables
The viewer will learn how to use the =DISCRINV command to create a discrete random variable, use this command to model a set of probabilities and outcomes in a Monte Carlo simulation, and learn how to find the standard deviation of a set of probabilities and outcomes with the =STDEVPR command.

1. Discrete Random Variables: Type in the set of outcomes and corresponding probabilities in cells A2:B6

2. Enter =SUM(B2:B6) into cell B7

3. Enter =DISCRINV(RAND(),A2:A6,B2:B6) into cell B9 and label “Profit”

4. Enter =B9 into cell B14

5. Select cells A14:B213

6. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

7. Enter =AVERAGE(B14:B213) into cell B11 and label “Mean”

8. Enter =STDEV(B14:B213) into cell B12 and label “StDev”

9. Enter =STDEVPR(A2:A6,B2:B6) into cell C12

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 3: Monte Carlo Simulations and Conditional Probability
The view will learn how to download and install SIMTOOLS and FORMLIST into Excel, how to use SIMTOOLS to generate a Monte Carlo simulation of 30 sales calls, and how to calculate the conditional probability based on the results of the
Monte Carlo simulation.

1. Download and Install SIMTOOLS: Search Roger Myerson on Google, and click on the first link

2. Follow the links to find the SIMTOOLS download and download it

3. Go to Excel add-ins, click Select and find the file

4. Check the square to the left of SIMTOOLS.XLAM

5. Click Select to install

6. Use SIMTOOLS to generate a Monte Carlo Simulation: Open the spreadsheet from the last tutorial that simulates 30 sales calls

7. Enter =IF(C2=E2,1,0) into cell B33 and enter =C4 into cell C33

8. Enter target number of sales =12 into cell C26

9. Select A33:C232

10. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

11. Calculate the Conditional Probability: Enter =IF(C34=$C$26,B34,”..”) into D34 and copy down to D232

12. Enter =SUM(D34:D232) into Cell F28 and label “# High Skill”

13. Enter =COUNT(D34:D232) into Cell F29 and label “Total Target”

14. Enter =F28/F29 into Cell F31


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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 2: Simulating Sales Calls
The viewer will learn how to simulate a series of sales calls dependent on a single skill level and learn how to simulate a series of sales calls dependent on two skill levels.

1. Simulating Independent Sales Calls: Enter .75 into cell C2 – “skill level”

2. Enter =IF(RAND()<$C$2,1,0) into cell A2 and copy to A31

3. Enter =SUM(A2:A31) into cell C4

4. Simulating Calls With Two Different Skill Levels: Enter =2/3 into cell E2 for high skill and =1/3 into cell F2 for low skill

5. Enter =IF(RAND()<0.5, E2, F2) into cell C2

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LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:ankitha reddy
nice one.. thanks for the video
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Working With Basic Random Variables in Excel
The viewer will learn how to simulate a series of coin tosses with the rand() function and learn how to make these “tosses” depend on a predetermined probability.

1. Flipping Coins in Excel: Enter =RAND() into cell A2

2. Recalculate the random variable with the key combination fn+F9 (Also whenever a cell’s content is edited it recalculates)

3. Enter =IF(A2<0.5,”Heads”,”Tails”) into cell B2

4. Copy down to simulate 20 independent coin tosses

5. Enter =IF(B2=”Heads”, 1, 0) into cell C2 and copy down to C21

6. Count total and number of tosses and total number of heads (Calculate probability of heads versus the average of column C)

7. Changing the Probability: Enter 0.75 into cell E4

8. Change cell B2 to: =IF(A2<$E$4,"Heads","Tails") and copy down

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Backstage View in Excel
Viewers will learn the different options available in the Backstage view in Excel 2013.
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Accessibility in Excel
Viewers will learn how to maximize accessibility options in an Excel workbook for users with accessibility issues.
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Microsoft Applications

43K

Solutions

37K

Contributors

Microsoft applications include a variety of software programs, including development and digital authoring programs (Expression and Media Center), educational programs, Internet software, including Essentials, Skype and the Live family, anti-virus, productivity applications and suites like Office, Excel, Word, Outlook, Access and PowerPoint, video games and server applications such as Exchange, SharePoint, IIS and Virtual Server.