Microsoft Applications

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Microsoft applications include a variety of software programs, including development and digital authoring programs (Expression and Media Center), educational programs, Internet software, including Essentials, Skype and the Live family, anti-virus, productivity applications and suites like Office, Excel, Word, Outlook, Access and PowerPoint, video games and server applications such as Exchange, SharePoint, IIS and Virtual Server.

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How to Identify Fonts on a website and download them.
If you’ve ever visited a web page and noticed a cool font that you really liked the look of, but couldn’t figure out which font it was so that you could use it for your own work, then this video is for you!

In this Micro Tutorial, you'll learn you how to quickly and easily identify fonts that are used on any web page you visit, as well as how to download those fonts from Google’s fonts collection site with a couple of mouse clicks, so long as Google has them available.

The video also covers how to install downloaded fonts into Windows so that they can be used in any text editing software you have that allows you to select different fonts.

I plan to also write an illustrated article tutorial on this topic, so if you prefer reading and viewing screen shots as opposed to video learning, then head over to my article How to Identify Fonts on a website and download them.

Please enjoy the video..

1. (00:33) Install the Fount Java Script button into your browser

Browse over to FOUNT in your browser and follow the instructions on the page to install the the free "fount" button.

2. (01:03) Identify the Font you're interested in

On any web page containing the font you're interested in, click your newly installed fount button and then click on the font text you want to identify

3. (01:40) Click the Google Fonts link if available

If the View fonts on Google Fonts link becomes available to you, then Google has a copy of the font available for download. Click the link to be taken to the font download area. If the link is not there, then you will need to do a manual search to find out where you can obtain the font elsewhere.

4. (01:50) Download the Font from Google Fonts

5

Expert Comment

by:Basem Khawaja
Very smart expert.
0
LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Thanks Basem, I'm glad you found it useful and thank you for endorsing the video! Much appreciated. :)

Regards, Andrew
0
Angular Fundamentals
LVL 13
Angular Fundamentals

Learn the fundamentals of Angular 2, a JavaScript framework for developing dynamic single page applications.

How to tell Microsoft Office that a word is NOT spelled correctly
This Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial shows how to tell Microsoft Office that a word is NOT spelled correctly. Microsoft Office has a built-in, main dictionary that is shared by Office apps, including Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Word. When an Office module, such as MS Word, gives us the red squiggly underline signifying a misspelled word, yet it really is spelled correctly (such as a proper noun), we're all familiar with how to add it to the custom dictionary, that is, simply right-click the word and select Add to Dictionary. But suppose we type in a word that does not get the red squiggly underline, that is, Word thinks it is spelled correctly, yet we do not like that spelling, and we want Word (and other Office apps) to flag it as a misspelling. This video explains a Microsoft supported technique for achieving that.

1. Locate the ExcludeDictionary file


Exit all Office apps.

Using Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you prefer), navigate to this file:

c:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\UProof\ExcludeDictionaryEN0409.lex

Of course, <username> is your user name (in my video, it is Joe). The exact name of the file will vary depending on your language and Office version, but it will begin with ExcludeDictionary and have a LEX file extension.

Step1

2. Open the ExcludeDictionary file


Using Notepad (or whatever plain text editor you prefer), open the ExcludeDictionary file, which will be empty the first time you open it. If you do a File>Open, make sure that All Files is selected, since it is a LEX
14

Expert Comment

by:baffledbill
Thank you for the detail and writing it in an understandable way.

Based on your information, I played around with the various English files and my locale and language settings and saw it work as you suggested. I also found that it is safe to simply delete the files, and let Office recreate the appropriate one when it performs a spell check.
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
You're welcome, Bill. I'm glad to hear that it works for you. And thanks to you for determining that it is safe to delete the LEX file(s) — that Office will re-create the appropriate one when it performs a spell check. I hadn't tried that — very good to know! Regards, Joe
0
How to install the Office 2016 desktop applications that come with the free trial of Office 365 Home
In a previous video Micro Tutorial here at Experts Exchange, I explained how to get a free, one-month trial of Office 365, which provides the desktop versions of Office 2016. For Windows, this includes Access 2016, Excel 2016, OneNote 2016, Outlook 2016, PowerPoint 2016, Publisher 2016, and Word 2016, as well as Microsoft OneDrive. The previous tutorial ended at the point of downloading the installer for the Office 2016 desktop modules for Windows. This new tutorial goes through the installation process for those applications.

1. Run the downloaded installer


Using Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you prefer), locate the downloaded installer for the Office 2016 apps that are included as part of the Office 365 Home subscription. The name may vary depending on your operating system, but it will look something like this:

Setup.<lots of other characters here>.exe

Run it (usually, via a double-click, but that depends on your file manager and settings) and then click the "Run" button on the "Security Warning" dialog.

step1

2. Accept the User Account Control dialog


Depending on your User Account Control (UAC) settings, you may or may not get the UAC dialog. If you do, click the "Yes" button.

step2

3. Wait until all Office 2016 apps are installed


Although it says, "We'll be done in just a moment", grab a cup of coffee.

step3

4. Check for the Office Tools shortcuts


Check to make sure that the installer created a "Microsoft Office 2016 Tools" program group, with two shortcuts in it.

step4

5. Check for the Office shortcuts


Check to make sure that the installer created shortcuts for all of the Office 2016 apps. It does not
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How to get a free trial of Office 365 with the Office 2016 desktop applications
Office 365 is currently available in five editions. Three of them are for business use: Office 365 Business Essentials, Office 365 Business, and Office 365 Business Premium. Two of them are for home/personal use: Office 365 Home and Office 365 Personal. However, only one of them offers a free trial — Office 365 Home. This Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial explains how to go through the process of obtaining the free, one-month trial for Office 365 Home, which includes the desktop versions of Office 2016. For Windows, this includes Access 2016, Excel 2016, OneNote 2016, Outlook 2016, PowerPoint 2016, Publisher 2016, and Word 2016, as well as Microsoft OneDrive. In a subsequent EE video Micro Tutorial, I show how to install the downloaded desktop versions of those Office 2016 modules in a Windows 7 system.

1. Visit the website for Office 365 Home


Visit the site with the only Office 365 edition that currently offers a free trial:
https://products.office.com/en-us/compare-microsoft-office-products

Step1

2. Request free trial


Click the "Try for free" button.

Step2aClick the "Try 1-month free" button.

Step2b

3. Sign into your Microsoft account


Enter your email or phone for your Microsoft account, your password, and click the "Sign in" button.

Step3

4. Go through the payment process


Even though it is a free trial, you must provide a payment method and go through the payment process. So be prepared with a credit/debit card or a bank account or PayPal. If you are unwilling to provide a payment method, you cannot get the free trial.

Step4

5. Go through the install process

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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:Yashwant Vishwakarma
Thank You for sharing Joe :)
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
You're welcome, Yashwant. I'm glad you like it! Regards, Joe
0
How to delete the Recently Browsed folder list in Microsoft Office Picture Manager
Microsoft Office Picture Manager has a Picture Shortcuts pane that shows a list with the Recently Browsed folders. While creating my video Micro Tutorial here at Experts Exchange showing How to Install Microsoft Office Picture Manager in Office 2013 (by utilizing Microsoft SharePoint Designer 2010), I discovered that Picture Manager itself does not provide the capability to delete items from the Recently Browsed folder list or to delete the list in its entirety. Fortunately, there's an easy way to do it outside of Picture Manager. This video Micro Tutorial explains the method.

1. Locate the OIScatalog.cag file


Open Windows/File Explorer or whatever file manager you use and navigate to this file:

c:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Microsoft\OIS\OIScatalog.cag

<username> is the user name, such as Joe in the screenshot below.

Step1

2. Exit Picture Manager and open the OIScatalog.cag file


Close all instances of Picture Manager that are running and then open the OIScatalog.cag file in Notepad or whatever text editor you use.

Step2

3. Delete lines


Delete the lines containing the folders that you want to be removed from the Recently Browsed folder list and Save the OIScatalog.cag file.

Step3

4. Run Picture Manager


Run Picture Manager to verify that the folders have been removed from the Recently Browsed list.

Step4

5. Optional test — delete entire list



Close all instances of Picture Manager that are running and then delete the OIScatalog.cag file. Run Picture Manager to verify that the entire Recently Browsed folder list has been removed.

Step5
That's it! If you find this video to be helpful, please click the
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How to Install Microsoft Office Picture Manager in Office 2013
Microsoft Office Picture Manager is not included in Office 2013. This comes as quite a surprise to users upgrading from earlier versions of Office, such as 2007 and 2010, where Picture Manager was included as a standard application. This video explains how to correct this serious omission by the folks in Redmond and install (for free!) Microsoft Office Picture Manager 2010, which plays very nicely with Office 2013. This video Micro Tutorial is fully documented in my Experts Exchange article, How to Install Microsoft Office Picture Manager in Office 2013.

1. Determine the bit-level of your Office 2013.


Open any Word document (a new, blank one is fine).

To see if you have the 32-bit or 64-bit version of Office 2013, click the File menu, then Account, then About Word.

Step1a
Step1b

2. Download the Microsoft SharePoint Designer.


Download the matching bit-level for your Office 2013 from one of these links:

32-bit
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=16573

64-bit
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=24309

Step2

3. Run the downloaded SharePoint installer.


Using Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you prefer), execute the downloaded installer and on the opening screen click the Customize button.

Step3

4. Mark all three program sections as Not Available.


Click the drop-down on Microsoft SharePoint Designer and select Not Available.

Click the drop-down on Office Shared Features and select Not Available.

Click the drop-down on Office Tools and select Not Available.

Step4a
Step4b

5. Select Picture Manager to install.


Click the plus sign for Office Tools to expand it.

Click the drop-down on Microsoft Office Picture Manager and select
10

Expert Comment

by:pokercrazy
Thank you! The changes to Office 2013 are not the best. I appreciate you putting this together.
Have a good day
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi pokercrazy,
You're welcome! I'm glad you found it helpful. If you wouldn't mind clicking the thumbs-up button under the video window, I'd really appreciate it. You have a nice day, too. Regards, Joe
0
Building Probability Models in Excel Part 7: Modeling a Correlated Two-Fund Investment
The viewer will learn how to create two correlated normally distributed random variables in Excel, use a normal distribution to simulate the return on different levels of investment in each of the two funds over a period of ten years, and, create a Monte Carlo simulation using the simulated returns.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the means and standard deviations of the return of both of the funds, along with the correlation coefficient

2. Select B7:C7 and type =CORAND($B$5), then press Command+Shift+Enter

3. Copy down to row 16

4. Label the returns of fund 1 and fund 2

5. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(B7,$B$2,$B$3)) into cell E7 and copy down to E16

6. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(C7,$C$2,$C$3)) into cell F7 and copy down to F16

7. Label the $1 investment into fund 1 and fund 2

8. Enter =H6*E7 into cell H7 and =I6*F7 into cell I7 then copy both down to row 16

9. Enter =H16 into cell B25 and =I16 into cell C25

10. Select A25:C524 then click ToolsSimToolsSimulation Table


0

Expert Comment

by:Richard Shaw
In the SIM table (A25: A524) -- what is the meaning and use of the column A data?
0
Building Probability Models in Excel Part 6: Investment Modeling Using a Log-Normal Distritribution
The viewer will learn how to create a normally distributed random variable in Excel, use a normal distribution to simulate the return on an investment over a period of years, Create a Monte Carlo simulation using a normal random variable, and calculate the 5% Value at Risk of the investment from the results.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the mean and standard deviation of possible returns

2. Label column A “Return” in cell A5

3. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(RAND(),$B$2,$B$3) into cell A6 and copy down to cell A15

4. Enter 1 into cell B5 to represent $1 invested

5. Enter =B5*A6 into cell B6 and copy down to cell B15

6. Enter =B15 into cell B20

7. Select A20:B519

8. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

9. Enter 1000 into cell B17 and label “Initial”

10. Enter =$B$17*B21 into cell C21 and copy down to cell C519

11. Enter =PERCENTILE(B20:B519,0.05) into cell B18 and label 5% VaR

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 5: Modeling an Investment Using Discrete Random Variables
The viewer will learn how to use a discrete random variable to simulate the return on an investment over a period of years, create a Monte Carlo simulation using the discrete random variable, and create a graph to represent the possible returns over 500 iterations.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the amount invested, the possible returns, and the corresponding probabilities

2. Label column A and B “Return” and “Wealth,” respectively in A11 and B10

3. Enter =DISCRINV(RAND(),$B$2:$B$7,$A$2:$A$7) into cell A12 and copy down to cell A21

4. Enter =D2 into cell B11

5. Enter =B11*A12 into cell B12 and copy down to cell B21

6. Create a Monte Carlo Simulation: Enter =B21 into cell B23

7. Enter =B21 into cell B23

8. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 4: Discrete Random Variables
The viewer will learn how to use the =DISCRINV command to create a discrete random variable, use this command to model a set of probabilities and outcomes in a Monte Carlo simulation, and learn how to find the standard deviation of a set of probabilities and outcomes with the =STDEVPR command.

1. Discrete Random Variables: Type in the set of outcomes and corresponding probabilities in cells A2:B6

2. Enter =SUM(B2:B6) into cell B7

3. Enter =DISCRINV(RAND(),A2:A6,B2:B6) into cell B9 and label “Profit”

4. Enter =B9 into cell B14

5. Select cells A14:B213

6. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

7. Enter =AVERAGE(B14:B213) into cell B11 and label “Mean”

8. Enter =STDEV(B14:B213) into cell B12 and label “StDev”

9. Enter =STDEVPR(A2:A6,B2:B6) into cell C12

0
Python 3 Fundamentals
LVL 13
Python 3 Fundamentals

This course will teach participants about installing and configuring Python, syntax, importing, statements, types, strings, booleans, files, lists, tuples, comprehensions, functions, and classes.

Building Probability Models in Excel Part 3: Monte Carlo Simulations and Conditional Probability
The view will learn how to download and install SIMTOOLS and FORMLIST into Excel, how to use SIMTOOLS to generate a Monte Carlo simulation of 30 sales calls, and how to calculate the conditional probability based on the results of the
Monte Carlo simulation.

1. Download and Install SIMTOOLS: Search Roger Myerson on Google, and click on the first link

2. Follow the links to find the SIMTOOLS download and download it

3. Go to Excel add-ins, click Select and find the file

4. Check the square to the left of SIMTOOLS.XLAM

5. Click Select to install

6. Use SIMTOOLS to generate a Monte Carlo Simulation: Open the spreadsheet from the last tutorial that simulates 30 sales calls

7. Enter =IF(C2=E2,1,0) into cell B33 and enter =C4 into cell C33

8. Enter target number of sales =12 into cell C26

9. Select A33:C232

10. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

11. Calculate the Conditional Probability: Enter =IF(C34=$C$26,B34,”..”) into D34 and copy down to D232

12. Enter =SUM(D34:D232) into Cell F28 and label “# High Skill”

13. Enter =COUNT(D34:D232) into Cell F29 and label “Total Target”

14. Enter =F28/F29 into Cell F31


1
Building Probability Models in Excel Part 2: Simulating Sales Calls
The viewer will learn how to simulate a series of sales calls dependent on a single skill level and learn how to simulate a series of sales calls dependent on two skill levels.

1. Simulating Independent Sales Calls: Enter .75 into cell C2 – “skill level”

2. Enter =IF(RAND()<$C$2,1,0) into cell A2 and copy to A31

3. Enter =SUM(A2:A31) into cell C4

4. Simulating Calls With Two Different Skill Levels: Enter =2/3 into cell E2 for high skill and =1/3 into cell F2 for low skill

5. Enter =IF(RAND()<0.5, E2, F2) into cell C2

0
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:ankitha reddy
nice one.. thanks for the video
0
Working With Basic Random Variables in Excel
The viewer will learn how to simulate a series of coin tosses with the rand() function and learn how to make these “tosses” depend on a predetermined probability.

1. Flipping Coins in Excel: Enter =RAND() into cell A2

2. Recalculate the random variable with the key combination fn+F9 (Also whenever a cell’s content is edited it recalculates)

3. Enter =IF(A2<0.5,”Heads”,”Tails”) into cell B2

4. Copy down to simulate 20 independent coin tosses

5. Enter =IF(B2=”Heads”, 1, 0) into cell C2 and copy down to C21

6. Count total and number of tosses and total number of heads (Calculate probability of heads versus the average of column C)

7. Changing the Probability: Enter 0.75 into cell E4

8. Change cell B2 to: =IF(A2<$E$4,"Heads","Tails") and copy down

1
Backstage View in Excel
Viewers will learn the different options available in the Backstage view in Excel 2013.
1
Accessibility in Excel
Viewers will learn how to maximize accessibility options in an Excel workbook for users with accessibility issues.
1

Microsoft Applications

44K

Solutions

38K

Contributors

Microsoft applications include a variety of software programs, including development and digital authoring programs (Expression and Media Center), educational programs, Internet software, including Essentials, Skype and the Live family, anti-virus, productivity applications and suites like Office, Excel, Word, Outlook, Access and PowerPoint, video games and server applications such as Exchange, SharePoint, IIS and Virtual Server.