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Microsoft Office is an integrated suite of applications that includes Outlook, Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Visio and InfoPath, along with a number of tools to assist in making the individual components work together. Coding within and between the projects is done in Visual Basic for Applications, known as VBA.

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How to Create Calendar Reports from Access Queries
Have you created a query with information for a calendar? ... and then, abra-cadabra, the calendar is done?! I am going to show you how to make that happen.

Visualize your data!  ... really see it

To use the code to create a calendar from a query, simply import the (only) module (mod_HtmlCalendarReport_s4p) from the download (see Step 1, below)  into your working database (and then compile and save, of course). You can get the same code by choosing File, Import in the VBE (Visual Basic Editor -- Alt-F11) and choosing the BAS file.  

Importing VBA doesn't, of course, include easy-to-launch macros (even though the macros run VBA procedures) ... triggering them is a snap -- especially if you use a menu form with buttons and other controls.  

Please, as you make changes, rename the 'test' procedures to have more meaningful names depending on how you customize them and how they are used. And add your own comments ... and indent?

If you feel like sharing, your ideas are welcome, and appreciated.

Using vba:
Application.FollowHyperlink Create_HtmlCalendar(sQueryName)
  • will open a web page with the calendar created from the query specified by sQueryName
  • The Create_HtmlCalendar function creates the calendar as an HTML file (web page)
  •   it returns the path and filename when done.
  • You have a calendar file you can email and share with others.
  • you may wish to add VBA Error Handling (Basics video)

What do you need to know to use this feature?
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Get your Conversational Ransomware Defense e‑book
LVL 1
Get your Conversational Ransomware Defense e‑book

This e-book gives you an insight into the ransomware threat and reviews the fundamentals of top-notch ransomware preparedness and recovery. To help you protect yourself and your organization. The initial infection may be inevitable, so the best protection is to be fully prepared.

display Triangles! and Circles! in a Microsoft Access Query -- Get Previous Record too
Visualize your data even better in Access queries. Given a date and a value, this lesson shows how to compare that value with the previous value, calculate the difference, and display a circle if the value is the same, an up triangle if it increased, or a down triangle if it decreased ... and stagger the markers for even greater grasp.

This lesson also covers how to handle non-American date formats, and optimize performance with a subquery.

If you like this video, please Like, Share, and Comment ~ thank you

1. Make a new query based on a table (MyData) with a date (TheDate) and a value (Price)


   - add date and value fields to the grid
   - sort in decending order by date

2. Add another copy of the table to the query


   - Access will '_1' to the end of the name of the copy at the top of the fieldlist to make it unique.
   - This table will represent the record for 'yesterday',  or whenever the previous value was recorded.
   - add date and value fields to the grid and give them aliases (for instance, PrevDate and PrevPrice) since field names have to be unique

3. Create a calculated field to show the difference


   - for instance --> Diff: CCur( MyData.Price - MyData_1.Price )
   - between a value in the reference record and the previous record
   - Wrap with function to convert to currency to ensure the result is the correct data type
   - the calculated field name (alias) is 'Diff' since it appears before the colon

4. Create a calculated field to show the Unicode symbol corresponding to a Circle or Triangle to graphically represent the difference

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Expert Comment

by:Andy Brown
Nice work Crystal - thank you for sharing.
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LVL 22
thank you, Andy

Unicode:

Note: Some fonts have more, and better, Unicode representations than others. For Windows standard built-in fonts, Arial Unicode MS and Lucida Sans Unicode have fair coverage.  Common fonts such as Arial, times New Roman, and Calibri can be okay too.

If you cannot show the Unicode characters used to demonstrate, try these instead:

filled circle  --> 9679

down-pointing triangle --> 9660

up-pointing triangle --> 9650
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How to export Office 365 mailboxes to PST using eDiscovery
In this video you will find out how to export Office 365 mailboxes using the built in eDiscovery tool. Bear in mind that although this method might be useful in some cases, using PST files as Office 365 backup is troublesome in a long run (more on that topic here).
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How To Make a Graph with Microsoft Access
Do you want to know how to make a graph with Microsoft Access? First, create a query with the data for the chart. Then make a blank form and add a chart control. This video also shows how to change what data is displayed on the graph as well as formatting, chart type, titles and legend.

"A picture is worth a thousand words"

1. Make a query to show what you want on the X-axis (Category) and Y-axis/es (Values)


2. Create a Chart object on a form or report using the Chart tool


3. Follow wizard steps, but don't worry about the data


4. Set the RowSource for the chart object to be the data that you want


5. Resize and Format the chart -- and set/change other properties such as text for Title(s)


6. To progammatically modify the chart, watch the next video in this series, 'Manipulate Graphs in Microsoft Access using VBA'.

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Polish Reports in Access
Polish reports in Access so they look terrific. Take yourself to another level. Equations, Back Color, Alternate Back Color. Write easy VBA Code. Tighten space to use less pages. Launch report from a menu, considering criteria only when it is filled out.

If you haven't already seen it, watch and do all the steps for 'Create a Query and Grouped Report and Modify Design using Access'
https://www.experts-exchange.com/videos/4514/Create-a-Query-and-Grouped-Report-and-Modify-Design-using-Access.htm

1. Download the START and SOLUTION databases

ReportPolish_START_SOLUTION.zip

2. Change equations for sum descriptions in each of the group footer sections to cut extra words.


Month format code is mmm-yy
Year format code is yyyy

3. Set Width of product category footer descriptive equation to 2.8 inches and Left to 0.2 inches.


4. Delete extra labels with the caption = sum


5. Set width of other group footer descriptive equations to 3 inches.


6. Set Top of sum amount controls to 0 in the group footer sections.


7. Bold header and footer group section controls.


8. Tighten spacing to reduce pages.


9. Set group sections to 'keep header and first record together on one page'.


10. Set Back Color and Alternate Back Color for each section:


- Product Category = aqua
- Day = orange
- Month = blue
- Year = green

11. Set group header and footer controls to Back Style = Transparent.


12. Save, Close, and Rename the report.


13. Modify the menu form to add a command button with a Click [Event Procedure] to open the report in print preview.


Remember to Debug, Compile, and then Save

14. Write VBA code to construct criteria that the user may have picked and ignore criteria that is not specified.


15. Modify the OpenReport code to call the criteria function for the WhereCondition argument.


Remember to Debug, Compile, and then Save

16. Now for the fun part ... open your new report for any date, or date range, or no criteria!

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LVL 17

Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Great video submission, Crystal!  Congratulations.  Your video has been Approved and is now published on Experts Exchange.  Feel free to share this video by selecting the social sharing icons.
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LVL 22
thank you, Kyle
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Create a Query and Grouped Report and Modify Design using Access
Access reports are powerful and flexible. Learn how to create a query and then a grouped report using the wizard. Modify the report design after the wizard is done to make it look better. There will be another video to explain how to put the final polish on the report, rename it, and add it to a menu form. Download the START and SOLUTION sample databases.

1. Download the START and SOLUTION sample databases (zip file)

SimpleGroupedReport_START_SOLUTION_D.zip

2. Open the START sample database

3. Create a Query to Line Up Data for Report

4. Use the Report Wizard to create a Grouped Report


Source is the query created in step 3

5. Group by year, month, day, then product category

6. Sort by product name then descending amount

7. Specify the amount to be summed

8. Choose Outline layout

9. Modify the Report Design


Add, delete, resize and move controls; show and use different report sections; spacing and boundaries; calculated controls;  formatting and properties; Report View and Print Preview.

10. Compare what you did to the SOLUTION database

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LVL 22
the next video is here:

Polish Reports in Access
https://www.experts-exchange.com/videos/4559/Polish-Reports-in-Access.html
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LVL 17

Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Thanks!
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Using, Creating and Modifying Styles in Microsoft Excel
Excel styles will make formatting consistent and let you apply and change formatting faster. In this tutorial, you'll learn how to use Excel's built-in styles, how to modify styles, and how to create your own. You'll also learn how to use your custom styles in multiple workbooks.

To follow along with this tutorial, you can use your own files or download the files I use in the video:
www.flisser.com/classfiles/excel-styles.zip
When you want to format cells in Microsoft Excel, you can do it manually, by selecting fonts, font color and size, background colors and borders, or you can do the formatting quickly and automatically using styles. If you used styles in other programs, you’ll be familiar with the concept: a style is a mixture of formatting that you can apply over and over, like paint.

There are two advantages to using styles:

  • Speed. When you have a lot of cells to format, it’s faster to apply a style than to apply all the formatting features individually. And if you need to change a formatting feature of all the cells – like just the color or the font – changing the style definition will immediately update the cell formatting.
  • Consistency. When formatting a lot of cells, it’s easy to make a mistake and select a slightly different color or font size. But when you apply styles, the exact, same formatting gets applied every time.
  • Excel has built-in styles that you can use, and you can also modify them and create your own.
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LVL 17

Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Congratulations, Bob!  Your video is Accepted and now published on Experts Exchange.
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How to tell Microsoft Office that a word is NOT spelled correctly
This Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial shows how to tell Microsoft Office that a word is NOT spelled correctly. Microsoft Office has a built-in, main dictionary that is shared by Office apps, including Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Word. When an Office module, such as MS Word, gives us the red squiggly underline signifying a misspelled word, yet it really is spelled correctly (such as a proper noun), we're all familiar with how to add it to the custom dictionary, that is, simply right-click the word and select Add to Dictionary. But suppose we type in a word that does not get the red squiggly underline, that is, Word thinks it is spelled correctly, yet we do not like that spelling, and we want Word (and other Office apps) to flag it as a misspelling. This video explains a Microsoft supported technique for achieving that.

1. Locate the ExcludeDictionary file


Exit all Office apps.

Using Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you prefer), navigate to this file:

c:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\UProof\ExcludeDictionaryEN0409.lex

Of course, <username> is your user name (in my video, it is Joe). The exact name of the file will vary depending on your language and Office version, but it will begin with ExcludeDictionary and have a LEX file extension.

Step1

2. Open the ExcludeDictionary file


Using Notepad (or whatever plain text editor you prefer), open the ExcludeDictionary file, which will be empty the first time you open it. If you do a File>Open, make sure that All Files is selected, since it is a LEX
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Expert Comment

by:baffledbill
Thank you for the detail and writing it in an understandable way.

Based on your information, I played around with the various English files and my locale and language settings and saw it work as you suggested. I also found that it is safe to simply delete the files, and let Office recreate the appropriate one when it performs a spell check.
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LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
You're welcome, Bill. I'm glad to hear that it works for you. And thanks to you for determining that it is safe to delete the LEX file(s) — that Office will re-create the appropriate one when it performs a spell check. I hadn't tried that — very good to know! Regards, Joe
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Excel Error Handling Part 3 -- Run and Fix Bugs
This is Part 3 in a 3-part series on Experts Exchange to discuss error handling in VBA code written for Excel.

Part 1 of this series discussed basic error handling code using VBA.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/videos/1478/Excel-Error-Handling-Part-1-Basic-Concepts.html

Part 2 went in depth on how the VBA  to copy values to blank cells works, and how to loop.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/videos/1498/Excel-Error-Handling-Part-2-VBA-to-Copy-Values-Down-to-Blank-Cells-in-an-Excel-Column.html

Although helpful, it is not necessary to watch parts 1 and 2 before this lesson.

This lesson runs code to see what it does and then breaks working code so we can explore errors.  We run and fix, debug, compile, use and not use Option Explicit, step through code while it is running, look at the watch window to see values of variables, set and clear breakpoints, stop, continue running, and learn how debugging and error handling work.

01. For a list of macros, press Alt-F8


   When you are in an Excel Workbook, press Alt-F8 for a list of Macros.

02. To go to VBA, press Alt-F11


   When you are in an Excel Workbook, press Alt-F11 to go to the Visual Basic Editor (VBE) where you can write Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).

03. To watch variable values, press Ctrl-W


   When you are in VBA code, press Ctrl-W to open the Watch window and set expressions to watch the value of.  If a variable name is highlighted when Ctrl-W is pressed, it will be filled in the Expression.

04. Stop


   Add a Stop statement to the code to cause the code to stop on that line when it runs.

05. To single-step, press F8

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Fix Code to fill Missing data in Excel. Loop through spreadsheet in VBA.
This Experts Exchange lesson shows how to use VBA to loop through rows in Excel.  In order to sort, filter, and use database features, there needs to be a value in each column for every row. When data arrives with values missing, code to copy values where it is blank can be run.

This lesson shows the manual process to fill blanks, and the VBA code to implement it.

This is Part 2 in a 3-part series to discuss error handling in Excel.

Part 3 of this series will add errors to the code and then show how to fix them.  Part 1 of this Experts Exchange series suggested basic error handling code.

01. Set up the error handler


   At the top of the code for your procedure, the error handler is set up using     On Error GoTo Proc_Err

02. Dimension Variables


   Declare variable names and data types that will be used in this procedure.

03. Initialize Variables


   Initialize the values of variables that will be used in this procedure.

04. Calculate Variables


   Calculate the values of variables that be determined.

05. Give User a Chance to Back Out


   Issue a message box to the user and allow them to stop the process.

06. Determine the Last Row


   Determine the last row on the worksheet that needs to be written to.

07. Loop through each Row of Data and Save or Write Value


   Loop through each row and either save the value that is there, or write the last value saved if a value is needed.

08. Continue Looping until Done


   Continue looping until all values in the specified column are written.

09. Exit Code


   After the procedure code, a line label for the exit code (Proc_Exit: ) is used to signify what happens at the end of the procedure. This is code to gracefully exit.

10. Error Handling Code

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LVL 22
This is Part 2 in a 3-part series to discuss error handling in Excel.  It can be watched independently of the other videos.  This presentation focuses on automating a manual process to copy values from one row to the next in a column of an Excel spreadsheet.

You will learn how to loop through rows using VBA.  This example copies values to blank cells, but you could do something else in your loop.

Part 3 of this series will add errors to the code and then show how to fix them.  
http://www.experts-exchange.com/videos/1518/Excel-Error-Handling-Part-3-Run-and-Fix-Bugs.html

Part 1 of this series reviewed basic error handling code.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/videos/1478/Excel-Error-Handling-Part-1-Basic-Concepts.html

Attached is the download file for this lesson, and the next: Books_ErrorHandling_02_Code2_CopyDownBlanks.xlsm
Books_ErrorHandling_02_Code2_CopyDo.xlsm
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New feature and membership benefit!
LVL 10
New feature and membership benefit!

New feature! Upgrade and increase expert visibility of your issues with Priority Questions.

Basic Error Handling code for VBA and Microsoft Office
This lesson covers basic error handling code in Microsoft Excel using VBA. This is the first lesson in a 3-part series that uses code to loop through an Excel spreadsheet in VBA and then fix errors, taking advantage of error handling code.

This lesson, Part 1, is the basics.  Whether you are writing VBA for Excel, Access, Word, or another Microsoft Office application,  basic error handling is the same.

01. Set up the error handler


   At the top of the code for your procedure, the error handler is set up using     On Error GoTo Proc_Err

02. Exit Code


   After whatever your procedure does, a line label for the exit code (such as Proc_Exit: ) is used to signify what happens at the end of the procedure. This can be code to cleanup object variables, or simply code to gracefully exit.

03. Error Handling Code


   After the exit code, a line label for the error handling code (such as Proc_Err: ) is used to begin what happens if there is an error.
Books_START_ErrorHandling_CopyDownB.xlsm
Books_ErrorHandling_CopyDownBlanks_.xlsm
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Expert Comment

by:chris pike
For someone who is trying to wrap their brain around VB for the first time, this video is starting to shed light on the subject.
Well done video, very helpful.

Thanks so much.
I will definitely look out for more videos from crystal (strive4peace).
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LVL 22
thank you, Chris and you're welcome  ~ if you have any questions about basic error handling, please post them here.
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How to install the Office 2016 desktop applications that come with the free trial of Office 365 Home
In a previous video Micro Tutorial here at Experts Exchange, I explained how to get a free, one-month trial of Office 365, which provides the desktop versions of Office 2016. For Windows, this includes Access 2016, Excel 2016, OneNote 2016, Outlook 2016, PowerPoint 2016, Publisher 2016, and Word 2016, as well as Microsoft OneDrive. The previous tutorial ended at the point of downloading the installer for the Office 2016 desktop modules for Windows. This new tutorial goes through the installation process for those applications.

1. Run the downloaded installer


Using Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you prefer), locate the downloaded installer for the Office 2016 apps that are included as part of the Office 365 Home subscription. The name may vary depending on your operating system, but it will look something like this:

Setup.<lots of other characters here>.exe

Run it (usually, via a double-click, but that depends on your file manager and settings) and then click the "Run" button on the "Security Warning" dialog.

step1

2. Accept the User Account Control dialog


Depending on your User Account Control (UAC) settings, you may or may not get the UAC dialog. If you do, click the "Yes" button.

step2

3. Wait until all Office 2016 apps are installed


Although it says, "We'll be done in just a moment", grab a cup of coffee.

step3

4. Check for the Office Tools shortcuts


Check to make sure that the installer created a "Microsoft Office 2016 Tools" program group, with two shortcuts in it.

step4

5. Check for the Office shortcuts


Check to make sure that the installer created shortcuts for all of the Office 2016 apps. It does not
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How to get a free trial of Office 365 with the Office 2016 desktop applications
Office 365 is currently available in five editions. Three of them are for business use: Office 365 Business Essentials, Office 365 Business, and Office 365 Business Premium. Two of them are for home/personal use: Office 365 Home and Office 365 Personal. However, only one of them offers a free trial — Office 365 Home. This Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial explains how to go through the process of obtaining the free, one-month trial for Office 365 Home, which includes the desktop versions of Office 2016. For Windows, this includes Access 2016, Excel 2016, OneNote 2016, Outlook 2016, PowerPoint 2016, Publisher 2016, and Word 2016, as well as Microsoft OneDrive. In a subsequent EE video Micro Tutorial, I show how to install the downloaded desktop versions of those Office 2016 modules in a Windows 7 system.

1. Visit the website for Office 365 Home


Visit the site with the only Office 365 edition that currently offers a free trial:
https://products.office.com/en-us/compare-microsoft-office-products

Step1

2. Request free trial


Click the "Try for free" button.

Step2aClick the "Try 1-month free" button.

Step2b

3. Sign into your Microsoft account


Enter your email or phone for your Microsoft account, your password, and click the "Sign in" button.

Step3

4. Go through the payment process


Even though it is a free trial, you must provide a payment method and go through the payment process. So be prepared with a credit/debit card or a bank account or PayPal. If you are unwilling to provide a payment method, you cannot get the free trial.

Step4

5. Go through the install process

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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:Yashwant Vishwakarma
Thank You for sharing Joe :)
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
You're welcome, Yashwant. I'm glad you like it! Regards, Joe
0
How to delete the Recently Browsed folder list in Microsoft Office Picture Manager
Microsoft Office Picture Manager has a Picture Shortcuts pane that shows a list with the Recently Browsed folders. While creating my video Micro Tutorial here at Experts Exchange showing How to Install Microsoft Office Picture Manager in Office 2013, I discovered that Picture Manager itself does not provide the capability to delete items from the Recently Browsed folder list or to delete the list in its entirety. Fortunately, there's an easy way to do it outside of Picture Manager. This video Micro Tutorial explains the method.

1. Locate the OIScatalog.cag file


Open Windows/File Explorer or whatever file manager you use and navigate to this file:

c:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Microsoft\OIS\OIScatalog.cag

<username> is the user name, such as Joe in the screenshot below.

Step1

2. Exit Picture Manager and open the OIScatalog.cag file


Close all instances of Picture Manager that are running and then open the OIScatalog.cag file in Notepad or whatever text editor you use.

Step2

3. Delete lines


Delete the lines containing the folders that you want to be removed from the Recently Browsed folder list and Save the OIScatalog.cag file.

Step3

4. Run Picture Manager


Run Picture Manager to verify that the folders have been removed from the Recently Browsed list.

Step4

5. Optional test — delete entire list



Close all instances of Picture Manager that are running and then delete the OIScatalog.cag file. Run Picture Manager to verify that the entire Recently Browsed folder list has been removed.

Step5
That's it! If you find this video to be helpful, please click the thumbs-up icon below. Thank you for watching!
2
How to Install Microsoft Office Picture Manager in Office 2013
Microsoft Office Picture Manager is not included in Office 2013. This comes as quite a surprise to users upgrading from earlier versions of Office, such as 2007 and 2010, where Picture Manager was included as a standard application. This video explains how to correct this serious omission by the folks in Redmond and install (for free!) Microsoft Office Picture Manager 2010, which plays very nicely with Office 2013. This video Micro Tutorial is fully documented in my Experts Exchange article, How to Install Microsoft Office Picture Manager in Office 2013.

1. Determine the bit-level of your Office 2013.


Open any Word document (a new, blank one is fine).

To see if you have the 32-bit or 64-bit version of Office 2013, click the File menu, then Account, then About Word.

Step1a
Step1b

2. Download the Microsoft SharePoint Designer.


Download the matching bit-level for your Office 2013 from one of these links:

32-bit
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=16573

64-bit
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=24309

Step2

3. Run the downloaded SharePoint installer.


Using Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you prefer), execute the downloaded installer and on the opening screen click the Customize button.

Step3

4. Mark all three program sections as Not Available.


Click the drop-down on Microsoft SharePoint Designer and select Not Available.

Click the drop-down on Office Shared Features and select Not Available.

Click the drop-down on Office Tools and select Not Available.

Step4a
Step4b

5. Select Picture Manager to install.


Click the plus sign for Office Tools to expand it.

Click the drop-down on Microsoft Office Picture Manager and select
10
 

Expert Comment

by:pokercrazy
Thank you! The changes to Office 2013 are not the best. I appreciate you putting this together.
Have a good day
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi pokercrazy,
You're welcome! I'm glad you found it helpful. If you wouldn't mind clicking the thumbs-up button under the video window, I'd really appreciate it. You have a nice day, too. Regards, Joe
0
Formatting Using the Format Painter
This Micro Tutorial will demonstrate in Microsoft Excel, Word, and Google docs how to simplify  your content using format painters.
0
A Simple Guide for Marketers
This Micro Tutorial will demonstrate how to analyze your website's back links using a network graph powered by a fusion table.
0
How to Create Paragraph Styles in Word
Learn how to create and modify your own paragraph styles in Microsoft Word. This can be helpful when wanting to make consistently referenced styles throughout a document or template.
6
How to Create a Table of Contents in Word
Learn how to make your own table of contents in Microsoft Word using paragraph styles and the automatic table of contents tool. We'll be using the paragraph styles in Word’s Home toolbar to help you create a table of contents.

01. Type out your initial header


02. Apply the Heading 1 style to it

03. Type out a secondary header

04. Apply the Heading 2 style to it

05. Type out a tertiary header

06. Apply the Heading 3 style to it

07. Generate your table of contents

Based on the headers you created. Place your cursor in the location you want the table of contents to be inserted

08. Select References from the toolbar

09. Select Table of Contents

10. Select Automatic Table 1

11. Done

Your Table of Contents will be inputted automatically using the heading styles you previously applied!
18
 

Expert Comment

by:AWS Online Training
Nice video shared by you.. It's really informative.. Thank you for the useful stuff.. For more courses like
<a href="https://www.mindboxtrainings.com/AWS-Online-Training.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AWS Online Training</a>
<a href="https://www.mindboxtrainings.com/Salesforce-Online-Training.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Salesforce Online Training</a>
refer Mindbox Trainings..
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Kiara Mora
Love the video. It was very informative and helped me with some of my class assignments myself. Check out my video as well would love the input. "How to record your desktop screen"!
0
Office 365 Training for Admins - 7 Day Trial
LVL 2
Office 365 Training for Admins - 7 Day Trial

Learn how to provision tenants, synchronize on-premise Active Directory, implement Single Sign-On, customize Office deployment, and protect your organization with eDiscovery and DLP policies.  Only from Platform Scholar.

Creating a Launch Slide in PowerPoint
The viewer will learn how to  create a slide that will launch other presentations in Microsoft PowerPoint.

1. In the finished slide, each item launches a new PowerPoint presentation and when each is finished it automatically comes back to this slide

2. Create a blank slide in PowerPoint by going to File – new-then click create slide

3. Delete the text boxes (just easier to see what is going on)

4. You can insert the background anytime, but you may wish to do it at the beginning so you can see how everything looks together

5. The title comes next. You can put in word art here or use the smart object later.

6. Choose one of the smart objects to insert and use. In this case I am using one of the ones with pictures (although this does require you to make 2 links for every presentation.

7. Depending on how many speakers there will be, you may need to increase the number of boxes shown by pressing enter to get additional entries and/or by duplicating the object.

8. IMPORTANT: duplicate the object before making any further changes

9. Once you have the right number of objects, go back to the first object and enter the data you want there, including pictures

10. Note that these boxes will auto resize the text to get it to fit. So be aware that in some cases it may not be readable. You will either need to fix the box size or the title

11. To make the links and have them work correctly, you will need to ungroup each object twice. The first ungrouping, ungroups them so they are no longer smart objects, the second one separates them from each other. You may wish to regroup at least the picture with the text AFTER you have completed the hyperlinking.

12. To create a hyperlink, right click on an ungrouped object, and choose Hyperlink. To link to another presentation you should put the presentation in the same directory as the “launch” slide and then in the dialog box choose it as an “Existing file or Webpage” then click Okay.

13. To make this show a panel discussion I am going to delete the bottom three pictures and the bottom 2 objects in group three. I will then resize the object I didn’t delete so it aligns with the bottom of the other groups.

14. I have several objects that won’t be linked. I will change the coloring of those to make it more obvious. Also the top four going across will not actually give talks – they are session leaders and are there only to introduce the others. Therefore I will change the colors on those as well and separate them to make it more obvious.

15. Finally I will change the master slide (go to view – slide master) to include our logos. You could also include the background here.

16. I’ll move the objects a little to accommodate the logos

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 7: Modeling a Correlated Two-Fund Investment
The viewer will learn how to create two correlated normally distributed random variables in Excel, use a normal distribution to simulate the return on different levels of investment in each of the two funds over a period of ten years, and, create a Monte Carlo simulation using the simulated returns.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the means and standard deviations of the return of both of the funds, along with the correlation coefficient

2. Select B7:C7 and type =CORAND($B$5), then press Command+Shift+Enter

3. Copy down to row 16

4. Label the returns of fund 1 and fund 2

5. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(B7,$B$2,$B$3)) into cell E7 and copy down to E16

6. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(C7,$C$2,$C$3)) into cell F7 and copy down to F16

7. Label the $1 investment into fund 1 and fund 2

8. Enter =H6*E7 into cell H7 and =I6*F7 into cell I7 then copy both down to row 16

9. Enter =H16 into cell B25 and =I16 into cell C25

10. Select A25:C524 then click ToolsSimToolsSimulation Table


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Expert Comment

by:Richard Shaw
In the SIM table (A25: A524) -- what is the meaning and use of the column A data?
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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 6: Investment Modeling Using a Log-Normal Distritribution
The viewer will learn how to create a normally distributed random variable in Excel, use a normal distribution to simulate the return on an investment over a period of years, Create a Monte Carlo simulation using a normal random variable, and calculate the 5% Value at Risk of the investment from the results.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the mean and standard deviation of possible returns

2. Label column A “Return” in cell A5

3. Enter =EXP(NORMINV(RAND(),$B$2,$B$3) into cell A6 and copy down to cell A15

4. Enter 1 into cell B5 to represent $1 invested

5. Enter =B5*A6 into cell B6 and copy down to cell B15

6. Enter =B15 into cell B20

7. Select A20:B519

8. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

9. Enter 1000 into cell B17 and label “Initial”

10. Enter =$B$17*B21 into cell C21 and copy down to cell C519

11. Enter =PERCENTILE(B20:B519,0.05) into cell B18 and label 5% VaR

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 5: Modeling an Investment Using Discrete Random Variables
The viewer will learn how to use a discrete random variable to simulate the return on an investment over a period of years, create a Monte Carlo simulation using the discrete random variable, and create a graph to represent the possible returns over 500 iterations.

1. Modeling a Simple Investment: Type in the amount invested, the possible returns, and the corresponding probabilities

2. Label column A and B “Return” and “Wealth,” respectively in A11 and B10

3. Enter =DISCRINV(RAND(),$B$2:$B$7,$A$2:$A$7) into cell A12 and copy down to cell A21

4. Enter =D2 into cell B11

5. Enter =B11*A12 into cell B12 and copy down to cell B21

6. Create a Monte Carlo Simulation: Enter =B21 into cell B23

7. Enter =B21 into cell B23

8. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 4: Discrete Random Variables
The viewer will learn how to use the =DISCRINV command to create a discrete random variable, use this command to model a set of probabilities and outcomes in a Monte Carlo simulation, and learn how to find the standard deviation of a set of probabilities and outcomes with the =STDEVPR command.

1. Discrete Random Variables: Type in the set of outcomes and corresponding probabilities in cells A2:B6

2. Enter =SUM(B2:B6) into cell B7

3. Enter =DISCRINV(RAND(),A2:A6,B2:B6) into cell B9 and label “Profit”

4. Enter =B9 into cell B14

5. Select cells A14:B213

6. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

7. Enter =AVERAGE(B14:B213) into cell B11 and label “Mean”

8. Enter =STDEV(B14:B213) into cell B12 and label “StDev”

9. Enter =STDEVPR(A2:A6,B2:B6) into cell C12

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Building Probability Models in Excel Part 3: Monte Carlo Simulations and Conditional Probability
The view will learn how to download and install SIMTOOLS and FORMLIST into Excel, how to use SIMTOOLS to generate a Monte Carlo simulation of 30 sales calls, and how to calculate the conditional probability based on the results of the
Monte Carlo simulation.

1. Download and Install SIMTOOLS: Search Roger Myerson on Google, and click on the first link

2. Follow the links to find the SIMTOOLS download and download it

3. Go to Excel add-ins, click Select and find the file

4. Check the square to the left of SIMTOOLS.XLAM

5. Click Select to install

6. Use SIMTOOLS to generate a Monte Carlo Simulation: Open the spreadsheet from the last tutorial that simulates 30 sales calls

7. Enter =IF(C2=E2,1,0) into cell B33 and enter =C4 into cell C33

8. Enter target number of sales =12 into cell C26

9. Select A33:C232

10. Click Tools > SimTools > Simulation Table

11. Calculate the Conditional Probability: Enter =IF(C34=$C$26,B34,”..”) into D34 and copy down to D232

12. Enter =SUM(D34:D232) into Cell F28 and label “# High Skill”

13. Enter =COUNT(D34:D232) into Cell F29 and label “Total Target”

14. Enter =F28/F29 into Cell F31


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Microsoft Office is an integrated suite of applications that includes Outlook, Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Visio and InfoPath, along with a number of tools to assist in making the individual components work together. Coding within and between the projects is done in Visual Basic for Applications, known as VBA.