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A miscellany is defined as a "collection of various pieces of writing by different authors", but it has come to mean something "Of items gathered or considered together of various types or from different sources" or "a collection or group composed of members or elements of different kinds". The word "miscellaneous" comes from the Latin word "miscere", meaning "to mix." You might have heard the expression "a mixed bag," which applies when you don't quite know what you're going to get. More commonly, a miscellaneous group is made up of an odd group of things that don't fit anywhere else.

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Some general thoughts by a long-time IT professional about the benefits and negatives of needing to work alone. A general light read that may resonate with existing and up and coming IT professionals. Have a read and share your thoughts on this topic in the comments section below.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian B
Great article John. I'd like to share my own story of what can happen when you are working "without a net" in more ways than one!

Years ago I was working alone on a Sunday doing some reorganization in the server room. As part of this I had shut down some servers, including the proxy server, a Windows 2000 Server box. It had never given me any trouble before, but for some reason this time when I switched it on, I got a BIOS error beep code.

Now, imagine this... I was a fairly new employee and the only "server guy". I had come from a company where I had a very technical manager I could call on in situations like this, but now the whole company was depending on me to fix what was basically our business connection to the internet. So nobody to call on, I decided to go outside and walk around the building to clear my head and think about what to do. Again, earlier days, so no smart phone to use to look up the code, and I had just killed my ability to get on the internet to look up what the error beep meant. Initial panic over and coming to my senses, by using best practices I realized that if the KVM keyboard was connected, the system would hang in some way. So crisis averted, a note was left with an external keyboard connected to the proxy server and everything was working fine when worked started on Monday.
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LVL 114

Author Comment

by:John
Thank you Brian.

Great addition. It reminds me (and us) of the value to shake one's head and think, and to avail ourselves of whatever support we can muster. Glad it all worked for you as well.
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Introduction to R
LVL 13
Introduction to R

R is considered the predominant language for data scientist and statisticians. Learn how to use R for your own data science projects.

You are confronted with an issue that you don't know how to resolve and at times know nothing about. So, how do you research on your own to find out about the issue and what the ways are to resolve it? Experts Exchange is a great start but when you need to know more there's the Internet.
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Tutorial for Including Alternate Text
The purpose of this tutorial is to show you how, with a minimum of effort, you can make your articles much more accessible for the blind and other readers with visual impairments at Experts Exchange.
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LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
That's wonderful of you Joe and I'm certain your efforts will be appreciated by many indeed!

The world could use more developers like yourself. Thank you very much for your kind words and this feedback. Very much appreciated.

Regards, Andrew
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LVL 67

Expert Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Andrew,
I want to let you know that the comments in my last post were not empty promises. I now have a beta version of TrayLaunch that contains the four features mentioned in that post, i.e., all functionality available via keyboard (including right-click on tray icons via hotkeys); alternative text for all graphics and screenshots in the manual; command line calls for all features; and 24 colors (A-Z, except for C and O, explained below).

Also, I added the ability to increase the font size in the program's GUIs. There are now the typical letter "A" boxes representing five font sizes, which I'm calling: tiny, small, medium, large, huge. The small size is the point size that is in all prior TrayLaunch versions. I decided to put in one smaller choice, but three larger ones.

The select-color-stars-to-run dialog box with the 24 colors and five font size choices looks like this now:

TrayLaunch 5.0.15 (beta) select color stars to run
The font size selection is sticky, automatically saved, and used in all GUI dialogs. That screenshot is from W7 with "Underline keyboard shortcuts and access keys" ticked via Control Panel>Ease of Access Center (it works the same in W10). As you can see, each color has Alt+<first-letter> as its access key. This is why O and C are not for colors, since Alt+O is the access key for the OK button and Alt+C is the access key for the Cancel button.

Once again, wanting you to know the impact of your article! Btw, as a beta user, you'll be getting the new version soon. :) Regards, Joe
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technology experience

Getting a job isn’t always easy. It can be especially intimidating if you’re going after your dream job—and you don’t have years of experience to back up your enthusiasm. Tech jobs are growing faster than ever, but it can be challenging to get hands-on experience that you can put on your resume. If you want to break into the tech industry but you don’t have direct work experience, you’re not necessarily out of luck. It is possible to get a job in the industry even if you have a lot to learn. Here are some tips for how to get a tech job when you don’t have much (or any) tech experience.


Effectively Market and Sell Yourself


You need to effectively market and sell yourself to land any job, but especially when you lack direct work experience. When it comes to your resume, every word counts. Mention the work experience that you do have, and explain how those skills are relevant to what you’ll need for the tech job you’re applying for. Bring up soft skills like communication, adaptability, and ability to learn. You should also emphasize your work ethic and your enthusiasm for working in tech.


You can put a positive or negative spin on anything, and when many people apply for jobs, they’re not used to selling themselves. They’re used to downplaying their accomplishments and aren’t able to market themselves and highlight their best qualities. Resist the urge to be humble—highlight your accomplishments and show potential employers why they’d be lucky to have you on their team.


Consider How and Why Companies Hire


If you’re trying to figure out how to get a tech job, try reverse-engineering the process. How and why do companies hire? Well, they hire because they either have more work to do than their current team can handle, or they lack specific skills on the team. With each job posting, you look at, think about your resume, cover letter, and application through that lens. How will they make hiring decisions?


The good news is that these days, many companies are focused more on personality, skills, and ability then they are on degrees or number of years of experience. They want people with interpersonal skills who are passionate, resourceful, and will take action. Even in tech, teamwork is important, so be sure to highlight your experience working with others.


Take on Tech Projects and Develop your Skills


You may not have experience working for a tech company, but that doesn’t mean you have to go into an interview empty-handed. Create your own experience! Immerse yourself in the tech scene and get connected with people who are working on projects. Find a mentor or see how you can get involved. Consider going back to school and getting a masters degree in some aspect of technology. If you’re able to, getting an internship, learning new skills via online courses, or tinkering with your own projects can help you get valuable experience you can talk about.


Get a Tech Job by Highlighting Your Personality Strengths


There are a lot of stereotypes about people in tech, and one of the most persistent is that people who code or work with computers have terrible people skills. The truth is, companies need people with those all-important “soft skills” too. Knowing your value and your personality strengths can help you get a job in tech, even if you’re still a newbie on the technical side.


Some of the skills that employers look for are leadership and emotional intelligence. You might take these for granted, but they take a long time to develop and can help a company become more productive and create a stronger culture. Still not convinced? A global study showed that 67% of the qualities and skills that companies were hiring for were emotional intelligence skills. Understand the power of your personality and leverage it when you’re looking for a job.


It’s Never Too Late to Jump In


If you think it’s too late for you to get into the tech industry and become successful, think again. It’s a fast-moving industry that rewards people who jump in with both feet, take risks, and show that they’re adaptable and confident. It’s never too late to learn, update your resume, and take a shot at getting a tech job so you can grow your career!


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Being too curious can sometimes get you into big and costly trouble.
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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:BillDL
Although it is not detailed in your article, nor on the Information Commissioner's Office pages linked to, I assume the named people accessed patient records using computers rather than looking at hardcopy records.  That's the only real way that multiple instances of access could realistically have been logged.

I wonder whether the National Health Service (or any of the affected Health care Trusts) have actually placed any restrictions on who is permitted (and I refer to user account status here) to gain access to various areas of their IT databases in the wake of these breaches?

The main subject of your article, namely Clare Lawson, was a Staff Nurse. In such a position there would normally be a Charge Nurse (equivalent to Supervisor in other vocational disciplines) above her on that ward and also a Matron or Sister (a "Manager" nurse) covering that ward and perhaps others.  It isn't known from the available information whether any staff of those ranks would consistently be on duty at the same times as the subject, but if they were then they are the supervisory members of staff who should have access to patient records, not the standard nursing staff.  There may be some situations, however, where a Staff Nurse could have been in charge and therefore may have required legitimate access to records during a shift.  This is not to say that even a higher ranking member of nursing staff may be tempted to excessive and knowingly wrong patient record accesses, but keeping permission to those of a certain ranking and above would reduce the likelihood.  

The second subject (Nicola Wren) was an Administrator and it is possible that in such a position whe would have have required access to patient records.  There isn't much that could be done by way of restriction in such a case, but it looks as though this woman was frequently checking for updates in records relating to a friend, acquaintance, or relative over the 3 week period.

There is absolutely no reason why the third subject, Marian Waddell, should have had access to patient records held in computer databases because she was a Nursing Auxiliary.  This position is sometimes referred to by the title "Healthcare Assistant".  Often these positions are occupied by ex-nurses or midwives who returned to healthcare after long periods of absence during which their qualifications lapsed.  They are either part-qualified or unqualified "nurses".  I'm not saying they don't know what they are doing, because some know more than doctors or nurses, but their duties are restricted.  Again though, the ICO web page relating to Marian Waddell does not specify whether she accessed a computer record or a hardcopy record.  All it says is that she accessed the records of one patient.

What I am most curious about is the statement made by the Director of Investigations for the ICO:
"This abuse of a position of trust has caused significant distress to a number of people".
Obviously there would be some distress caused to fellow nursing staff who might feel betrayed and let down by a colleague's actions, but were the patients themselves informed about the unlawful accesses of their records?
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LVL 6

Author Comment

by:Adrian McGarry
Thanks for the comments BillDL.

I agree, this must have been captured via computer security audit logging, but is not the sort of detail that was released by the ICO.

We would all hope that appropriate measures are taken for securing highly sensitive information, such as patient records, especially in large organisations such as the NHS in the UK.

Unfortunately (& I am going to link this to information security lapses, like with the Wannacry incident) it is very apparent the NHS is not a good example for information security and data governance.

Even this week we have seen the reports of how much Wannacry cost the NHS https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.zdnet.com/google-amp/article/this-is-how-much-the-wannacry-ransomware-attack-cost-the-nhs/ £92m.  How much would it have cost the NHS to deploy a 0-day threat system to protect against this and countless other malware attacks, let alone the human cost of this malpractice.

You really only need to prove this by looking at the UK ICO https://ico.org.uk/action-weve-taken/ to see how many NHS trusts have been involved in action enforcements.

And is this any different for other countries?  This article covers recent Australian data breaches within the healthcare system http://www.mondaq.com/australia/x/743342/data+protection/Data+breaches+on+the+rise+in+the+health+sector

We see far too many organisations with very bad practices, poor security and no training for staff.

To teach basic security skills, providing training to all employees is common-sense, which is why I write about this subject, train people and organisations about this subject and sometimes can get very emotive about data protection and security.

Does this make me a bit geeky about this subject, maybe!  But there is a human cost to this.  Not only with these NHS examples but with each data breach that occurs because of negligence, malpractice and just plain incompetence, it’s unnecessary and can be stopped by raising awareness.
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Article Header
A discussion about the billing practices of IT Support contractors and my ideas of what is fair and what is not!
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LVL 100

Expert Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
It's important, in my opinion, to state from the onset, that repairs billed by the hour could quickly exceed the value of the PC.  If I can't fix a machine in 30-60 minutes, I give the client the option of a complete reload or buying a new machine... but you also have to keep in mind, it's not JUST the cost of the hardware and to a lesser extent the software.  There's configuration and data migration.  If they want things EXACTLY the way they were before, add that to the cost of a new PC and fixing the old one, even when the total charge is as much as a new physical computer, it may prove considerably cheaper.  (You buy a new house and the expenses don't stop there.  Now you often spend at least a little on "upgrades" and customizations - paint, carpet, new appliances, the move in costs... etc.... house costs $200000... but you then spend $20000 more on incidentals/extras
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Expert Comment

by:Brighton Davies
Brilliant write-up – completely agree with your thoughts on transparency. Can’t tell you how many times I got ripped off by subpar support b/c they weren’t upfront about knowledge/rates/etc. I’ve learned to take care of a lot on my own (Google FTW) but when I need an expert eye/opinion mustardit.co.uk doesn’t let me down or charge ridiculous fees.
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There is a very good article here on Experts Exchange on the 5 Reasons you should NOT fix a computer for free. That article is both articulate and for the most part true. But the other side is worth stating. Here is my experience...
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Unfolding Roadmap to Success for your Startup!
We must learn what customers really want, not what they say they want or what we think they should want. -Eric Ries: Author of Lean Startup
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Technology has revolutionized how we create, share and comment on information. So does that mean that there are new ethical standards for information within the digital age? Read on to find out!
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Confidence
Confident people attract everything that is good in this world, and they will also attract other confident people because of the law of attraction, together achieving success. Good luck on your path!
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Exploring SharePoint 2016
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Exploring SharePoint 2016

Explore SharePoint 2016, the web-based, collaborative platform that integrates with Microsoft Office to provide intranets, secure document management, and collaboration so you can develop your online and offline capabilities.

gdpr
As of May 25th, 2018, the GDPR is binding on all businesses and organisations. Here are the main procedures and best practices to apply. Otherwise there will be heavy fines.
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Password Managers
This is the conclusion of the review and tests for using two or more Password Managers so you don't need to rely on just one. This article describes the results of a lot of testing in different scenario's to reveal which ones best co-exist together. Enjoy...
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Expert Comment

by:Otto Didact
Thank you, Andrew Leniart;

Parts 1 & 2 of both of these articles were excellent.  

I actually like the idea of being able to carry around or safely stash a flashdrive as a alternate vault for passwords.  Being able to plug a USB stick into Laptop`s USB port & gain access through whatever gateways, even without WiFi, Bluetooth, Ethernet cables, &/or cell service & unlimited data minutes for an Internet connection seems like a beneficial advantage to me.  I as yet have never used a password manager, though have been following reviews their use for several years now, but then have usually felt they fell short of being applicable to how I & my wife would use them.  I especially like your innovation in deciding to redundantly use two password managers together.  

I think your article was the first time that any reviewer mentioned being able to print or save all of one`s passwords as a PDF, though for the purpose of keeping it with my passport doesn`t seem like a good idea, but in a safe deposit box, or in an other such safe place does.  And so does saving it to a USB thumbdrive, to then be placed in a safe place or carried on one`s person as necessary.  Saving a copy to the cloud, where an operational version of one`s password manager exists at one`s beck & call, & for syncing different devices & browsers, seems unnecessary.  

I am still a bit consternated by them not working with Microsoft Edge (is this the fault of the password manager industry or that of Microsoft), & with them not being able to figure out how to autofill or sign in on some login situations.  The latter especially sounds like someone needs to assign some set of universal criteria for login methodology, for both the password managers & the password  requiring gateways to adhere to in order to operate efficiently together, for the sake & necessity of the users of password managers, & of the sites & applications that rightly require security precautions.
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Otto,

Parts 1 & 2 of both of these articles were excellent.

Firstly, welcome to Experts Exchange and thank you for reading my articles and especially for your kind comment! I'd be grateful if you could take a moment to endorse the articles by clicking the thumbs-up icon right underneath the end of them :)

I actually like the idea of being able to carry around or safely stash a flashdrive as a alternate vault for passwords.  Being able to plug a USB stick into Laptop`s USB port & gain access through whatever gateways, even without WiFi, Bluetooth, Ethernet cables, &/or cell service & unlimited data minutes for an Internet connection seems like a beneficial advantage to me.

You're not the only one. Others have expressed the same desire, yet the password developers seem to continue heading in the direction of making your vault fully available to you in a browser on their website instead. RoboForm is a typical example that moved away and dropped support for exactly what you prefer doing. I see that as a huge responsibility on the developers part, so it's important to consider who you are going to trust with the storage of such sensitive information.

That said, the only way I can see of influencing password manager developers is to continue showing them there is still a need for this type of technology and function. Keep giving them feedback - if they get enough of it, they may just start to listen.

I as yet have never used a password manager, though have been following reviews their use for several years now, but then have usually felt they fell short of being applicable to how I & my wife would use them.

You make an interesting comment. Obviously, I'm one of those that always recommends the use of Password managers. In my field of work, far too often I see people using the same password on multiple websites (and confess I've been guilty of that myself at times) and still frequently see real-life examples of sensitive password information being stuck to monitors via sticky notes, in totally unsecured spreadsheets or on a piece of paper laying on a desk or in a drawer. I'm not just talking about your average home user here either. I support many Accounting and Legal Firms who I've still noticed doing things like that. Basic human nature tendencies kick in, regardless of educational and professional achievement levels.

Everyone has unique requirements, so I'd be genuinely interested to hear "how" the variety of password managers fell short for your particular circumstances?

I especially like your innovation in deciding to redundantly use two password managers together.

Thank you so much. I've actually been doing that for years because I could never find a single solution that wouldn't break for me under one circumstance or another when a website changed its login steps. The use of two solved that, but the trick was finding two that could work together in harmony and not constantly fight one another for control of logging me into the websites I was visiting, or password protected applications on my computer. Currently, Roboform and Avast play very well together, but if I had to make a choice between the two, then I would probably keep the Avast solution. Despite the lack of features that Roboform offers, it seems to handle changed login pages far more effortlessly.

I think your article was the first time that any reviewer mentioned being able to print or save all of one`s passwords as a PDF, though for the purpose of keeping it with my passport doesn`t seem like a good idea, but in a safe deposit box, or in an other such safe place does.

Indeed, and you make an excellent observation that I perhaps should have clarified on a bit more. I would certainly never encourage people to save to PDF or even print out their passwords, but there have been times when that's helped folks out of a  jam. The capability is actually there in just about every password application I've tried, but I don't tend to encourage its use except under specific scenarios that a client may explain to me that they have.

And so does saving it to a USB thumbdrive, to then be placed in a safe place or carried on one`s person as necessary.

I do hope you have that USB thumb drive encrypted with a nice strong password in the event you ever lost it though? :)

Saving a copy to the cloud, where an operational version of one`s password manager exists at one`s beck & call, & for syncing different devices & browsers, seems unnecessary.

This again falls back to personal requirements and circumstances I think. For me, the option is invaluable, because I have a couple of laptops that I use when I travel, sometimes need to access my bank using my phone, or a website on an Ipad when showing a demo of a proposed solution to a client. Everything is available to me, all the time. But in order to have that luxury, I must trust that both Roboform and Avast will keep all my information secure - per my earlier statement.

In circumstances where such functionality isn't needed, such as perhaps yours, there is no need to use it just because it's available. There are functions in my Password managers that I simply ignore because I have no use for them. In fact, if "you" don't need cloud access to synchronize different devices and browsers, then you are in a somewhat enviable position of taking advantage of the freely available versions of those tools, where Cloud Synchronization is often offered as a "paid" feature.

I am still a bit consternated by them not working with Microsoft Edge (is this the fault of the password manager industry or that of Microsoft), & with them not being able to figure out how to autofill or sign in on some login situations.

A combination of both is my understanding. To have an application available as a plug into Microsoft Edge, it has to be vetted and approved by Microsoft first. How much work and/or expense this involves on the part of the developers I couldn't guess. But I am confident in one thing - from the feedback I received from all the password manager developers that were included in this review, all will at some point be updated to support Microsoft Edge. They will be forced to as the popularity of Microsoft's latest browser grows, if they want to retain their current userbase, subscribers and gain new ones over other competitive offerings.

The latter especially sounds like someone needs to assign some set of universal criteria for login methodology, for both the password managers & the password  requiring gateways to adhere to in order to operate efficiently together, for the sake & necessity of the users of password managers, & of the sites & applications that rightly require security precautions.

I don't believe it's so much as how to fill in the required information or security precautions, which would be a given. It's more about getting their application approved as a plug-in for Microsoft Edge, and subsequently even approved to be available on the Microsoft Store, strongly promoted in Windows 10. Again, this falls into how much effort is required to get past that vetting process. As I'm not a developer, that's something I'm not very familiar with.

My thanks for all of your feedback and comments Otto!

Regards, Andrew
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Business Startup
Starting a business requires forethought, planning and preparation. As eager as you are to get started with business activities, you need to walk through a few important steps to ensure that your business gets off on the right foot.
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By definition, working capital is the measure a company’s efficiency and its financial health from a short-term perspective. With the implementation of GST in India on July 1, 2017, the unorganized sector has to pay GST at various levels in order to redeem it themselves.
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Health Insurance Marketing
A recent study by Google illustrates that almost 84% of patients go for both online and offline sources for hospital research. What do you think, “Is the Healthcare Industry the next to be disrupted by Digital Marketing?”
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ux-788002_960_720
Even though starting and growing a lucrative business while you’re still in college sounds impossible, it is actually quite conceivable. There are several reasons why this is the perfect time to start a new venture.
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Expert Comment

by:Craig Kehler
Great article. One of our employees who went to Cal Poly did just that and they were very successful. http://www.sanluisobispo.com/news/business/article39157704.html
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Computer Science
There's never been a better time to become a computer scientist. Employment growth in the field is expected to reach 22% overall by 2020, and if you want to get in on the action, it’s a good idea to think about at least minoring in computer science and knowing how to code.
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ML Machine Learning Fellowship
Machine Learning is one of the profound applications of AI and therefore, just like AI, it is surrounded by myths and fears. Check out these facts about ML that demystify the related myths.
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The deadly train derailment that occurred recently in DuPont, Washington, raises a lot of questions. It was a new route, the first trip tested with passengers, and the train was travelling at 50 mph over the zone’s speed limit. Could IoT play a role in infrastructure safety and prevent tragedies?
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Become a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert
LVL 13
Become a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert

This course teaches how to install and configure Windows Server 2012 R2.  It is the first step on your path to becoming a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE).

Block Chain Technology
Blockchain technology enhances society similar to the Internet. Its effects are broad, disruptive, and will boost global productivity.
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Password-Managers
Each password manager has its own problems in dealing with certain websites and their login methods. In Part 1, I review the Top 5 Password Managers that I've found to be the best. In Part 2 we'll look at which ones co-exist together and why it's often useful to use more than one.
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LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Bernhard,

Thanks for your comments. 2FA is an important consideration for many, an unnecessary nuisance for others, and then you have the camp that believes it should be forced (or at least made as an available option) everywhere as standard practice :)

For my own part, if 2FA is an option, I'll always enable and use it, but that's not always so. My bank as an example doesn't have the option available to me to just log into my account - opting instead to only force 2FA on money transfers to accounts that have not been transferred to before. I could give dozens of other examples that don't make much sense to "me" personally.

At the end of the day, everyone must reach their own conclusions and decide on what's best for them.

Regards, Andrew
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LVL 33

Expert Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
Bernhard has an excellent point.  I love Sticky Password, but how does it know it is you if it doesn't store the credential you are logging in with?  I am actually in the midst of a tech support triage with SP and intend to ask the very question.

And by the way SP does have 2FA.
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Technology: Cure or Curse
Cyberspace is the new townsquare. Does the change from a physical space to a digital space spell doom and destruction or growth and prosperity.
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Win 10 - Audio Problem
It is a real story and is one of my scariest tech experiences. Most users think that IT experts like us know how to fix all computer problems. However, if there is a time constraint and you MUST not fail the task or you will lose your job, a simple task might turn out to be your scariest experience.
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In this article, I’ll show how research, determination, and use of modern technology helped me solve a DNA mystery.
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This article is written by John Gates, CISSP. Gates, the SNUG President-Elect, currently holds the position of Manager of Information Systems at Lake Park High School in Roselle, Illinois.
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Miscellaneous

26K

Solutions

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Contributors

A miscellany is defined as a "collection of various pieces of writing by different authors", but it has come to mean something "Of items gathered or considered together of various types or from different sources" or "a collection or group composed of members or elements of different kinds". The word "miscellaneous" comes from the Latin word "miscere", meaning "to mix." You might have heard the expression "a mixed bag," which applies when you don't quite know what you're going to get. More commonly, a miscellaneous group is made up of an odd group of things that don't fit anywhere else.