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Net Neutrality

The basic principle that prohibits internet service providers from favoring, slowing access, or blocking particular services or sites. The idea behind net neutrality supports equal access to all content and applications, regardless of the source, for an open internet.

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Here's an interesting analysis on all of the FCC comments submitted about Net Neutrality.

https://www.gravwell.io/blog/discovering-truth-through-lies-on-the-internet-fcc-comments-analyzed

A very small minority of comments are unique -- only 17.4% of the 22,152,276 total. The highest occurrence of a single comment was over 1 million.


Most comments were submitted in bulk and many come in batches with obviously incorrect information -- over 1,000,000 comments in July claimed to have a pornhub.com email address

Bot herders can be observed launching the bots -- there are submissions from people living in the state of "{STATE}" that happen minutes before a large number of comment submissions

...

One thing is certain about what we have found so far, though. The opinions of commenters using the organic website form submission and those whose comments were submitted in bulk or by bots differ wildly. This forces us to conclude that either the very act of going to the FCC comment site and providing a comment is only attractive to those of a certain political leaning, or that the bulk submission information is full of lies.
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Enhanced Intelligibility Without Cable Clutter
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Enhanced Intelligibility Without Cable Clutter

Challenge: The ESA office in Brussels wanted a reliable audio conference system for video conferences. Their requirement - No participant must be left out from the conference and the audio quality must not be compromised.

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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
I already did!
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This guy filed the only formal complaint with the FCC about Verizon.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/8/9/16114530/net-neutrality-crusade-against-verizon-alex-nguyen-fcc

Nguyen's complaints are comprehensive and wide-ranging. He points to Verizon temporarily blocking the Nexus 7, third-party iPhone 6s, and third-party Nexus 6s. He brings up Verizon charging people more for bringing their own phones to the network. He argues Verizon compelled phone providers to disable FM radios. He also mentions Verizon blocking PayPal, OneDrive, Samsung Pay, and other built-in apps.

...

Altogether, he alleges, Verizon has violated openness rules in six different ways, ranging from discriminatory pricing, to limiting customer choice, to simply lying about its network.
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Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Wow.  Meanwhile, Ajit is up there ignoring this guy's case.  Sheesh.  I'm becoming more and more disappointed by Verizon.
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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
I think it is admirable what he is doing. It will be a long process, a big corporation vs a man.
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Ryan,

We just learned that key congressional members -- backed by Verizon and Comcast -- are meeting in secret about net neutrality.[1] It's the first frightening step toward a worst-case scenario: Congress outlawing an open, censorship-free internet.

This is an emergency. Stopping lawmakers from passing an anti-net neutrality bill is the single most important thing we can do right now to save the net.

We've put up six billboards calling out members of Congress who are doing Comcast's bidding, and with your help, we can put up even more.

Will you chip in for another wave of billboards to stop Congress from killing net neutrality forever?


Comcast, Verizon and AT&T want to end net neutrality so they can charge extra fees and control what we see and do online. For months, FCC Chair Ajit Pai, a former Verizon lawyer, has been doing their bidding, pushing to undo the strong Title II rules we helped win in 2015.

Apparently, that's not good enough for Big Cable. Having received massive campaign contributions from Verizon and Comcast, members of the House Commerce Committee are now secretly working to rewrite the law that underpins net neutrality -- a step that would be nearly impossible to reverse.[2]

The response from Americans must be swift and unequivocal: Hands. Off. The internet.

We know the vast majority of Americans -- including 73% of Republicans -- support net neutrality.[3] We just need a fraction of them to get in their congressional members'…
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Where do you stand on Net Neutrality?
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Hi,

Verizon has just been caught red-handed slowing down Netflix and Youtube videos. They aren't giving customers the full speeds they pay for in what appears to be a blatant violation of net neutrality.[1]

At first, Verizon wouldn’t explain what was happening. Only after they were pushed and pushed by journalists and Internet users, the company assured customers that this was merely a test. But we're not buying it.

To make matters worse, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai -- coincidentally a former top lawyer for Verizon -- is actively working to destroy the rules that would prevent this type of abuse by big Internet providers.

This is exactly why we’re doubling down in the fight for saving net neutrality. If you chip in today, we'll be able to place hard-hitting billboards that urge Congress to rein in the FCC and stop them from destroying net neutrality.

FCC Chair Pai has been plotting to undo strong net neutrality rules ever since we helped win them back in 2015. Towing the party line of his former employer, Verizon, Pai appears hellbent on giving ISPs new powers to take as much money from Internet users as possible. [2]

Left to their own devices, Big Cable will do everything it can to control what we see and do online. This would affects all of us. We rely on the internet every day for our jobs and school, our daily lives, and for entertainment.

But the cable lobbyists are facing incredible pushback. Our July 12 Internet-Wide …
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FCCInfographic-SocialMedia-Sina-OS.pngThe results of the net neutrality Day of Action are in! Thank you to everyone in our tech community who participated by sending comments to the FCC, emails to Congress, and called Congress. Check out the days total results reported in our article update.
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There's been a lot of discussion lately about Net Neutrality and the various pros/cons. While I'm loath to have unnecessary legislation or "solutions in search of a problem" and greatly respect those viewpoints of the debate, I've ultimately fallen on the side in favor of Net Neutrality. Nilay Patel over at The Verge pulls no punches in his eloquent article that highlights so many of the reasons that have shaped my view on the issue.

It's a long read, but well worth it. This sort of thing impacts all of us in IT and no matter what happens or what opinions you hold on the matter, I'm hopeful we can all find common ground in keeping the internet great.
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Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
I called and left a message for my congressman Salud Carbajal.  Feelsgoodman.  

Experts Exchange is on the list with Google, Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and so many more.
https://www.battleforthenet.com/july12/?_fp=f_f5f283
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Administrative Comment

by:Mister Preston
I called Salud too!  It only took my 5 minutes.
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Loading-bar.pngToday, users from all websites and online communities are coming together to sound the alarm on the FCC's attack on net neutrality. Cable companies want to get rid of net neutrality. Without it, sites like ours could be censored, slowed down, or forced to charge extra fees. Stand with Experts Exchange today and support Title II and all users' rights to free and fast internet by contacting Congress and the FCC today!
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Expert Comment

by:ElrondCT
I mentioned blocking web sites because that's what EE focused on. But where is any evidence that "Without it, sites like ours could be censored, slowed down, or forced to charge extra fees"? NONE. Is something like that theoretically possible? Yes. Is there any realistic likelihood of it happening, and not being immediately rolled back by customer protest? No. EE and other net-neut advocates are conjuring bogeymen. And complaining about hidden charges is confusing the issue--that's not a net-neut matter, but ordinary customer protection that other laws cover.

A couple of years ago, Consumer Reports magazine put out a sob story about some small business down South that depended on the Internet for its business and was afraid that without net-neut, they could be blocked and lose their customers. Anyone who really thinks ISPs are spending their time looking for small businesses to destroy is delusional. That business is far more at risk from Google changing its ad policies. I'm personally dealing with such an issue right now; Google has decided that advertising free software is a security risk, and even though I've provided certification that the free software is trial software for our own application, there are no hitchhiking apps, and we've been using Google for nearly 10 years, they've suspended my site from all Google advertising, severely limiting my ability to reach new customers. Net-neut doesn't help me in the slightest on this. Google scares me more than Comcast.
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
But where is any evidence that  "Without it, sites like ours could be censored, slowed down, or forced to charge extra fees"? NONE. Is something like that theoretically possible? Yes. Is there any realistic likelihood of it happening, and not being immediately rolled back by customer protest? No.

Above I linked to examples of broadband providers intentionally blocking their customers from using certain connections (while denying it), throttling them (in deceptive ways), deceptively billing them and favoring their own content services over other 3rd parties'.

Their own customers. People who generally have no other Internet option and even if they did wouldn't swallow ~$150 ETF, new equipment/activation fees, and a phone call with a retention specialist, in protest.

And you think they're unlikely to do the same thing to edge providers? They already are. Those fees will be passed on to the customer (you & I) and if the edge provider doesn't pay-to-play, then I guess we'll just sit here and watch the *buffering* that we paid our hard earned money to see.
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Lessons on Wi-Fi & Recommendations on KRACK
Lessons on Wi-Fi & Recommendations on KRACK

Simplicity and security can be a difficult  balance for any business to tackle. Join us on December 6th for a look at your company's biggest security gap. We will also address the most recent attack, "KRACK" and provide recommendations on how to secure your Wi-Fi network today!

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Expert Comment

by:Nicholas
If you are using CloudFlare they also have an app you can enable without doing any coding

And the official site is
https://www.battleforthenet.com

This specific action date
https://www.battleforthenet.com/july12/
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Here's the TL;DR version.
"Net neutrality is a longstanding digital principle that internet service providers should treat all web traffic equally and fairly. This means providers cannot prefer one website or service over the other by granting unequal loading speeds or by blocking or slowing content."
Basically, this gives an internet service provider (ISP) the ability to purposefully slow down Netflix or Facebook if it wants to. "Netflix won’t disclose its Day of Action plans but says it will be “noticeable” for its users."
Sounds like they might be inclined to give its audience a taste of what this could be like?

Experts Exchange is on the list with Google, Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and so many more.
https://www.battleforthenet.com/july12/?_fp=f_f5f283
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Expert Comment

by:Sean Plemons Kelly, CISSP
It's great to see EE on that list of names.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
The list keeps growing! We're in good company :-)
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Expert Comment

by:Akhil Vinay Mandava
No one can stop us keep going.
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Expert Comment

by:Akhil Vinay Mandava
keep going guys no one can stop us.
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saveNetNeutrality_NativeAd.pngThe internet-wide Day of Action for all user's rights to net neutrality is July 12th! Take a stand by signing the petition here or leaving a comment with the FCC here on why you support Title II. (Click the "+Express" link to leave your comment.)
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netNeutralityArticleNativeAd.pngCheck out our new article about our stance on a user's right to net neutrality and why it's an important issue. Join us in this initiative by signing the petition and leaving a comment with the FCC on why you support Title II. (Click the "+Express" link to leave your comment.)
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Author Comment

by:Doug Walton
I haven't seen a full list, but here are some: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality#Arguments_against

Opponents of net neutrality regulations include economists, Internet providers and technologists. Among corporations, opponents include AT&T, Verizon, IBM, Intel, Cisco, Nokia, Qualcomm, Broadcom, Juniper, D-Link, Wintel, Alcatel-Lucent, Corning, Panasonic, Ericsson, and others.[82][160][161] Notable technologists who oppose net neutrality include Marc Andreessen, Scott McNealy, Peter Thiel, David Farber, Nicholas Negroponte, Rajeev Suri, Jeff Pulver, John Perry Barlow, and Bob Kahn.
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
Some of those names were actually slightly surprising. Last night I dug up another article showcasing some of the anti-net neutrality companies and how much they invested in lobbying:
https://www.dailydot.com/layer8/lobbyists-net-neutrality-fcc/
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Participating in the Internet-wide Day of Action to support Title II? We'd love to hear your opinion on net neutrality. Tell us in the comments below by 7 p.m. PST (today) and be included in a community response infographic.
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Join Experts Exchange in our support of a user's right to net neutrality. Below is our official company statement on this issue. We hope you will join this cause with us.

"Experts Exchange believes in a user's right to net neutrality. On July 12th, an internet-wide Day of Action, we will stand alongside those who support Title II, the legal framework protecting our online freedom."
Follow this link and click "+Express" to leave a comment with the FCC on why you support Title II.
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Expert Comment

by:Christopher Rourke
On July 12, "Hold your ground!" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6t4xMgrpjBs
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Free Tool: Site Down Detector
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Free Tool: Site Down Detector

Helpful to verify reports of your own downtime, or to double check a downed website you are trying to access.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

The Federal Communications Commission voted 2-1 today to start the process of eliminating net neutrality rules and the classification of home and mobile Internet service providers as common carriers under Title II of the Communications Act.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/05/net-neutrality-goes-down-in-flames-as-fcc-votes-to-kill-title-ii-rules/
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
net neutrality office space
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To submit complaints about the FCC getting rid of Net Neutrality, you can go here, then click "+Express" and fill out the form.

http://www.gofccyourself.com/
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Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Cool thank you
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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
Done :D
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
@Brian I could be off in my interpretation of how this will unfold, but I believe what will happen is your cost to the ISP will likely not be effected so much, who knows it might even go down. Your local ISPs are the ones who benefit the most from this, since they are the last mile to your house from the tier1 providers. They are the ones who can throttle content to the end user, until someone pads their coffers.

So in theory the tier1 provider (ie. Cogent) has to pay more to the last mile isp (ie. Charter) to prevent throttling, and the costs are ultimately passed on to the game service provider (ie. Sony/Xbox/etc) in a form of higher bandwidth costs for their game servers.  In turn, the game service provider will pass that cost on to you, in order to access the service. In theory, this would effect all of the services you enjoy (Netflix, Sony, Hulu, etc.) and each one of them would be passing higher access costs over to you.

So instead of having 1 higher bill (your ISP), you'll have dozens of higher bills.

I could be misunderstanding this entirely, but that's how I see it unfolding.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
@lucas: Agreed, that's certainly one way it could unfold. I could even foresee some combination of the two approaches: one where there's extra cost from my ISP for certain types of traffic prioritization, and the other where certain services have to increase their rates to ensure top tier speeds.

There is one other scenario that could play out, which is the one that free-market evangelists would hope for: that this whole thing finally provides enough incentive to open up more competition in the ISP market. If my provider is doing things like selling the data on my browsing history and throttling my bandwidth based on types of services used, that it provides an opportunity for a new competitor to differentiate their service. After all, the real root of the fears regarding a lack of net-neutrality stems from the lack of consumer choice (at least in the U.S., I can't really speak for other countries). I'm not really optimistic about this scenario happening, but I'd love to be proven wrong.
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Net Neutrality

The basic principle that prohibits internet service providers from favoring, slowing access, or blocking particular services or sites. The idea behind net neutrality supports equal access to all content and applications, regardless of the source, for an open internet.

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