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Politics can be defined as the study of the interactions of individuals and groups of people with each other, from the local to the global with the purpose of influencing each other, and can contain economic, military, governance, historical and theoretical or philosophical aspects.

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The US DoD recently released (via FOIA request) footage of an F18 SuperHornet tracking a UFO:
https://coi.tothestarsacademy.com/2015-go-fast-footage/

Kind of surprising this type of information doesn't create a maelstrom of headlines.

The tracking system used to capture the footage was Raytheon's Advanced Targeting Forward Looking Infrared pod: https://www.raytheon.com/capabilities/products/atflir

Interestingly, this isn't the first time UFO footage has been released:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/16/us/politics/pentagon-program-ufo-harry-reid.html
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Expert Comment

by:Alba Richi
Oh thank you for the link, it's very useful information for me.
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Become a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert
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Become a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert

This course teaches how to install and configure Windows Server 2012 R2.  It is the first step on your path to becoming a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE).

Experts Exchange is based in San Luis Obispo, otherwise known to locals as 'SLO'.  The city of SLO lost a valued member of its community a few months ago.  
Frank [Stone] built a reputation for “diligence and accuracy as a premier source of public safety news and reporting up and down the Central Coast"

Recently, the city's assemblyman voted for a bill to name a portion of its highway to this man.  On to the California State Senate Rules Committee.  I hope it passes there as well.

http://www.sanluisobispo.com/news/local/article161375423.html
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by:Brian Matis
Indeed... Huge loss to the community. Glad to see this being considered.
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saveNetNeutrality_NativeAd.pngThe internet-wide Day of Action for all user's rights to net neutrality is July 12th! Take a stand by signing the petition here or leaving a comment with the FCC here on why you support Title II. (Click the "+Express" link to leave your comment.)
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netNeutralityArticleNativeAd.pngCheck out our new article about our stance on a user's right to net neutrality and why it's an important issue. Join us in this initiative by signing the petition and leaving a comment with the FCC on why you support Title II. (Click the "+Express" link to leave your comment.)
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Participating in the Internet-wide Day of Action to support Title II? We'd love to hear your opinion on net neutrality. Tell us in the comments below by 7 p.m. PST (today) and be included in a community response infographic.
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Join Experts Exchange in our support of a user's right to net neutrality. Below is our official company statement on this issue. We hope you will join this cause with us.

"Experts Exchange believes in a user's right to net neutrality. On July 12th, an internet-wide Day of Action, we will stand alongside those who support Title II, the legal framework protecting our online freedom."
Follow this link and click "+Express" to leave a comment with the FCC on why you support Title II.
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by:Christopher Rourke
On July 12, "Hold your ground!" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6t4xMgrpjBs
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UpGuard's cyber risk analyst, Chris Vickery, discovers 198 million US voting records in an Amazon S3 bucket freely available online. One particular spreadsheet also calculates the voters probabilities for situations such as "how likely you are to have voted for a certain presidential candidate".  This breach is another reminder of how important personal data security is.
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by:Nicholas
Having this data in a public cloud provider is wrong to start with no?
After a quick glance through the article the data wasn't even encrypted.
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by:Lucas Bishop
Millions of dollars worth of data analysis, available for anyone to download for free. Brilliant!
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Whoa, whoa, whoa... Apparently in West Virginia, being a State Senator is a part time job. Which means that a State Senator likely has to work a normal, private-sector job. A job for a company that might have a strong opinion about a particular vote. A company that then might fire the State Senator after they voted in a way the company didn't like... Uh... Conflict of interest much?

What do you think? Is this system broken? How would you fix this?
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by:Jim Horn
There's very few employers that would allow someone to be gone for six months of the year and only work half time the other six months, which is the normal time demands of a Minnesota state legislator, so I’m having a hard time imagining what these part-time legislators would do for a career.     When I was in the Army National Guard employers didn't even care for me being gone one weekend a month and two weeks a year.

At those salaries I'm surprised we don't hear more stories about bribery, corruption, and employer conflict of interest.

As a side note when Jesse 'The Body' Ventura was governor he frequently refereed pro wrestling matches.  No conflict of interest there as I don't think it would affect the state if 'Bruno the Midnight Stalker' or 'The Bushwackers' won.   I still think it would have been great if he hired Axe and Slash as his state budget directors.
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by:Member_2_276102
I've mostly assumed that most (or all?) states had 'part time' legislators. It's both expensive and very disruptive to live in a legislative district, yet spend perhaps half of the year in the capital. 'Expensive' isn't truly meaningful, since per diem amounts are usually (always?) supplied. Still, splittling life between two places has costs.

Any regular "job" almost necessarily must be given up. Any business might be at least partly abandoned for a couple years or more -- even when not in session back "home", legislative attention must be given to citizens.

In the OP case, I'd be very suspicious of someone at or near a 'C'-level executive position who kept that position upon election. There'd be practically no way to give necessary attention to corporate matters and also to legislative responsibilities and obligations unless the corporate board had its own agenda for having its personal legislator..
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Angular Fundamentals
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Angular Fundamentals

Learn the fundamentals of Angular 2, a JavaScript framework for developing dynamic single page applications.

The Federal Communications Commission voted 2-1 today to start the process of eliminating net neutrality rules and the classification of home and mobile Internet service providers as common carriers under Title II of the Communications Act.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/05/net-neutrality-goes-down-in-flames-as-fcc-votes-to-kill-title-ii-rules/
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by:Lucas Bishop
net neutrality office space
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To submit complaints about the FCC getting rid of Net Neutrality, you can go here, then click "+Express" and fill out the form.

http://www.gofccyourself.com/
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by:Kyle Santos
Cool thank you
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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
Done :D
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Author Comment

by:Doug Walton
I mainly use my VPN to change my location (Netflix has different shows available in different countries, and you can watch Doctor Who on BBC in England), but otherwise I don't use it much.
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by:Lucas Bishop
I run a vpn on my home computer and on my phone (when using public wifi) just because I can't stand the thought of my data being collected without my permission. It's not foolproof though. For example, on public wifi many of your personal apps will connect to the internet, before the VPN connection is established... hence a bunch of personal data is potentially exposed. Or your VPN could go down and the same scenario happens. Putting together an article might be a good exercise though!
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Net Neutrality in the spotlight once again: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/01/fcc-chair-ajit-pai-wont-say-whether-hell-enforce-net-neutrality-rules/

Excerpt: Pai argues that removing regulations frees up money for ISPs to invest in building and upgrading networks.

My problem with that arrangement is whomever invests in implementing or upgrading infrastructure likely expects control over it. This can lead to difficulties applying regulation later as our needs and understanding change. Cable companies are a great example of this: http://gizmodo.com/5830956/why-the-government-wont-protect-you-from-getting-screwed-by-your-cable-company
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Ugh...
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
Eventually there will be one company that owns all of the fiber. The monthly payment to access Google (the internet) will consist of having Google glasses implanted on your retina.
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Deploying ransomware is now officially illegal in California:
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/01/watch-out-hackers-deploying-ransomware-is-now-a-crime-in-california/

The article notes that prior cases had been tried using existing extortion laws, so I wonder why ransomware needed its own specific version? Perhaps just a way to make it *extra* clear that it's illegal?
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Politics

1K

Solutions

775

Contributors

Politics can be defined as the study of the interactions of individuals and groups of people with each other, from the local to the global with the purpose of influencing each other, and can contain economic, military, governance, historical and theoretical or philosophical aspects.

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