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A printer is a peripheral which makes a persistent human readable representation of graphics or text on paper or similar physical media. Traditional printers are being used more for special purposes, like printing photographs or artwork, and are no longer a must-have peripheral; 3D printing has become an area of intense interest, allowing the creation of physical objects. An image scanner is a device that optically scans images, printed text, handwriting, or an object, and converts it to a digital image. Hand-held scanners, where the device is moved by hand, have evolved from text scanning "wands" to 3D scanners used for industrial design, reverse engineering, test and measurement, orthotics, gaming and other applications.

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How to password-protect a PDF with free software
This video Micro Tutorial shows how to password-protect PDF files with free software. Many software products can do this, such as Adobe Acrobat (but not Adobe Reader), Nuance PaperPort, and Nuance Power PDF, but they are not free products. This video explains how to do it with excellent, free software called PDF-XChange Editor from Tracker Software Products.

1. Download PDF-XChange Editor


Visit the PDF-XChange Editor section of the Tracker Software Products website:

http://www.tracker-software.com/product/pdf-xchange-editor

Click the white-on-green Download button for either product. It doesn't matter if you download PDF-XChange Editor or PDF-XChange Editor Plus, since you'll be selecting the Free Version when you install.

Step1

2. Run downloaded installer


Run the downloaded installer and select Free Version (unless, of course, you want more features and decide to purchase the Pro or Plus Version).

Step2

3. Open a non-secured PDF file in PDF-XChange Editor


Run PDF-XChange Editor and open a PDF file that does not currently have password protection on it.

Step3

4. Open Security section of Document Properties


Click File menu.

Click Document Properties.

Click Security category.

Step4

5. Open Password Security Settings dialog


Click Security Method drop-down.

Click Password Security.

Step5

6. Fill in Password Security Settings dialog


In Options section, select Compatibility from the drop-down and what you want encrypted via the radio buttons.

In Document Passwords section, enter password to open PDF and password to change permission settings.

In Permissions section, set Printing Allowed and Changing Allowed choices via the drop-downs; enable/disable content copying and
2
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How to divide/split a single image file into multiple image files
In an interesting question here at Experts Exchange, a member asked how to split a single image into multiple images. The primary usage for this is to place many photographs on a flatbed scanner and scan all of them into a single image file, but then easily split the single image file into multiple image files, one for each photo. The photos will be placed on the flatbed scanner with ample separation so that there is enough "white space" for the splitting software to separate the images. Of course, the solution may be used on any image that contains multiple images in it, that is, not necessarily scanned photos, as long as there is enough of a separation between images for the splitting software to detect the individual images. The solution presented in this video Micro Tutorial uses the excellent (free!) GIMP software and a filter (plugin/script) called Divide Scanned Images. Kudos to both the GIMP developers and Rob Antonishen, who developed DivideScannedImages and BatchDivideScannedImages.

1. Update to the latest version of GIMP


At the time of this video, the latest version was 2.8.20. This solution will almost surely run on earlier releases (and, with some luck, later ones), but the only version that I tested on is 2.8.20, which is available for download here:
https://www.gimp.org/

Step1

2. Determine location of your GIMP scripts folder

3
 
LVL 93

Expert Comment

by:nobus
as usual, a very good tutorial, and a very helpful teacher
thanks Joe for solving my problem
1
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
You're welcome, nobus — and thanks to you for the compliment and the endorsement — both very much appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
How to add page numbers to a PDF with Adobe Acrobat XI Pro
In a recent question here at Experts Exchange, a member asked how to add page numbers to a PDF file using Adobe Acrobat XI Pro. This short video Micro Tutorial shows how to do it.

1. Click the Tools button


That will expose the Tools pane.

Step1

2. Click the Pages arrow


That will expand the Pages section.

Step2

3. Click the Header & Footer drop-down


That will show three menu choices.

Step3

4. Click the Add Header & Footer... menu item


You will now have the Add Header and Footer dialog.

Step4

5. Select the Page Number format


Click the Page Number and Date Format... link.

Step5

6. Select the font for the page number



Step6

7. Set other options


There are several other features in the dialog, including Appearance Options, Margin sizes, and Page Range Options.

8. Select the location for the page number


Click in one of these six boxes: Left Header Text, Center Header Text, Right Header Text, Left Footer Text, Center Footer Text, Right Footer Text.

Step8

9. Add the page numbers


Click the Insert Page Number button and then click OK. Note that it's also possible to insert a Date (and format it, too).

Step9
That's it! You now have page numbers in your PDF file. Remember to Save the file or do a Save As if you don't want to overwrite the original PDF.

If you find this video to be helpful, please click the thumbs-up icon below. Thank you for watching!
2
 
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Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Congratulations.  Your video has been Accepted and is now published on Experts Exchange.  Feel free to share this video by selecting the social sharing icons to your left.
0
Xpdf - PDFfonts - Command Line Utility to List Fonts Used in a PDF File
In this seventh video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFfonts utility, which lists all the fonts used in a PDF file. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made. In addition to the name of the font, it shows the font type and whether or not the font is embedded in the PDF file (and, if embedded, whether or not it is a subset), along with other font information that is discussed in the documentation file.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFfonts tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdffonts.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFfonts tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdffonts.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a couple of sample PDF files into your test folder, preferably ones with many different fonts.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing

2
 
LVL 17

Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Congratulations!  Your video has been Accepted and is now published on Experts Exchange.  Thank you for your contributions.
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Kyle,
Thanks for publishing and upvoting — both appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
Xpdf - PDFtoPNG - Command Line Utility to Convert a Multi-page PDF File into Separate PNG Files
In this sixth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoPNG utility, which converts a multi-page PDF file to separate color, grayscale, or monochrome PNG files, creating one PNG file for each page in the PDF. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoPNG tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdftopng.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoPNG tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftopng.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder. Of course, it will work fine with a one-page PDF file, but it is more instructive to test it with a multi-page PDF.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoPNG executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFtoPNG utility


Issue the following command in the command prompt:

1
 
LVL 17

Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Congratulations, Joe!  Your video has been Accepted.  Great job. =)
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Kyle,
Thanks for the fast publishing and the compliment — both appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
How to create custom scanning profiles in PaperPort - Part 2
This video Micro Tutorial is the second in a two-part series that shows how to create and use custom scanning profiles in Nuance's PaperPort 14.5. But the ability to create custom scanning profiles also exists in PaperPort going back many years, so if you have an older version, such as PaperPort 11 or PaperPort 12, these videos will still be applicable for you. The first video tutorial shows how to create custom scanning profiles and reviews all the Scanner Enhancement Technology (SET) features, such as auto-straighten, delete blank pages, remove punch holes, etc. It also discusses scanning options, including Mode (B&W, Grayscale, Color), Resolution (100 DPI, 200 DPI, 300 DPI, etc.), and Size (Letter, Legal, A4, etc.). This second tutorial shows how to set the output file type for your scans, such as scanning directly to a PDF Searchable Image file, an Excel spreadsheet, or a Word document — all with text created by an automatic OCR process.

1. Run PaperPort and open the 'Output' tab of the scanning profile created in Part 1


Run PaperPort.

Click the Scan Settings button on the ribbon.

This will bring up the Scan or Get Photo pane.

Select the custom scanning profile that you created during Part 1 of this video tutorial series.

Click the Settings button.

Click the Output tab.

Step1

2. Test scanning to a PDF Image file


Click the drop-down arrow on the File type field.

Select PDF Image and click OK.

Put a document in your scanner and click the Scan button. You will now have a PDF Image
1
How to create custom scanning profiles in PaperPort - Part 1
This video Micro Tutorial is the first in a two-part series that shows how to create and use custom scanning profiles in Nuance's PaperPort 14.5. But the ability to create custom scanning profiles also exists in PaperPort going back many years, so if you have an older version, such as PaperPort 11 or PaperPort 12, these videos will still be applicable for you. This first video tutorial shows how to create (and name) custom scanning profiles (or edit existing ones) and reviews all of the Scanner Enhancement Technology (SET) features, such as auto-straighten, delete blank pages, remove punch holes, etc. It also discusses scanning options, including Mode (B&W, Grayscale, Color), Resolution (100 DPI, 200 DPI, 300 DPI, etc.), and Size (Letter, Legal, A4, etc.). The video takes a quick look at the output file type options, but that is discussed fully in Part 2 of the series.

1. Run PaperPort and bring up the 'Scan or Get Photo' pane


Run PaperPort.

Click the Scan Settings button on the ribbon.

This will bring up the Scan or Get Photo pane.

Step1

2. Create a new scanning profile or edit an existing one


To create a new scanning profile, click the New button.

To edit an existing scanning profile, click the profile you want to edit, then click the Settings button.

Step2

3. Name the new profile


Enter a name for the new profile.

If you want to copy settings from an existing profile, click the drop-down and select it.

Click the Continue button.

Step3

4. Select the Scanner Enhancement Technology (SET) features


Click the SET
0
How to OCR pages in a PDF with free software
We often encounter PDF files that are pure images, that is, they do not have text characters, but instead contain only raster graphics. The most common causes of this are document scanning software and faxing software/services that create image-only PDF files rather than PDF searchable image files, the latter having the scanned or faxed images and text created by Optical Character Recognition (OCR). The solution is to perform OCR on the image-only PDFs to create text. Many software products can do this, such as ABBYY FineReader, Adobe Acrobat (but not Adobe Reader) and Nuance's OmniPage, PaperPort, and Power PDF. Some can even do it in batch mode via a command line interface. But they are all non-free products, many quite expensive. This video Micro Tutorial shows how to OCR the pages of an image-only PDF, thereby creating searchable/copyable text, with excellent, free software called PDF-XChange Editor from Tracker Software Products.

1. Download the Free Version of PDF-XChange Editor


Visit the website for PDF-XChange Editor at Tracker Software Products:

http://www.tracker-software.com/product/pdf-xchange-editor

Tick the radio button for the installer you prefer and then click the DOWNLOAD NOW button.

Step1

2. Run the downloaded installer


Run the installer that you downloaded and select the Free Version (unless, of course, you want more features and would like to purchase the Pro Version).

Step2

3. Open the document in PDF-XChange Editor


The installer creates a program group called PDF-XChange with a shortcut in it for PDF-XChange Editor
15
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Rob-Down-Under
Brilliant Heads Up
I have used their Viewer for years, and for many of those years I was confused by their various programs and downloads. Difficult to ensure that you were getting the free viewer. Hasn't been quite as difficult for the last year.
With that history behind me, I strongly doubt that I could have worked out that they had a free Editor.

If you are just viewing PDFs and you had both the editor and the viewer installed - Do you just use the editor program all the time, or do you fell the viewer has extra viewing options ?

Rob
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Rob,
I agree — their downloads have always been confusing!

My recollection is that I received an email from them saying, essentially, that the free PDF-XChange Viewer (which I had been using for a long time) was being replaced/superseded by the free PDF-XChange Editor. In other words, there was no reason to have both products on the same system. However, I recollect keeping both for a while, until I was comfortable that the free Editor was all I needed. Once I made that determination, I uninstalled the Viewer and have used only the Editor ever since.

I see at their website that they still offer the Viewer, but note this comment at that link:
STOP PRESS STOP PRESS STOP PRESS

The PDF-XChange Editor is now available and supersedes the PDF-XChange Viewer !

STOP PRESS STOP PRESS STOP PRESS
So even Tracker Software is saying that there's no reason to use the free Viewer — use the free Editor instead!

Btw, here's another video that I did about the free version of the Editor:
How to rotate pages in a PDF with free software

Regards, Joe
0
How to rotate pages in a PDF with free software
Sometimes we receive PDF files that are in the wrong orientation. They may be sideways or even upside down. This most commonly happens with scanned or faxed documents. It is possible to rotate the view of these PDFs with the free Adobe Reader product, but it is not possible to save the PDF with the rotated pages using Adobe Reader — not even with the latest Document Cloud (DC) version (or any earlier version of Reader). To do this with an Adobe product requires the relatively expensive Adobe Acrobat (Standard or Professional). This video Micro Tutorial shows how to rotate the pages of a PDF, and save the rotated document, with excellent, free software called PDF-XChange Editor from Tracker Software Products.

1. Download the Free Version of PDF-XChange Editor


Visit the website for Tracker Software Products:

http://www.tracker-software.com/product/pdf-xchange-editor

Tick the radio button for the installer you prefer and then click the DOWNLOAD NOW button.

Step1

2. Run the downloaded installer


Run the installer that you downloaded and select the Free Version (unless, of course, you want more features and would like to purchase the Pro Version).

Step2

3. Open the document in PDF-XChange Editor


Run PDF-XChange Editor and open the sideways or upside-down document in it.

Step3

4. Run the Rotate Pages feature


Click Document menu

Click Rotate Pages

Step4

5. Select desired rotation and which pages to rotate


In the Direction drop-down, choose Clockwise 90 degrees or 180 degrees or Counterclockwise 90 degrees
2
Xpdf - PDFdetach - Command Line Utility to Detach Attachments from PDF Files
In this fifth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFdetach utility, which is able to list and, more importantly, extract attachments that are embedded in PDF files. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software.


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFdetach tool.


Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfdetach.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFdetach tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder.


Create a test folder.

Copy <pdfdetach.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file that has attachments into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called test.pdf, which is a PDF file created from my EE article, Windows 10 uses YOUR computer to help distribute itself, but with some attachments added to it).

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

3
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:NVIT
Hi Joe...

> A way to achieve that is to extract first with PDFdetach and then print the file to a PDF print driver.

That would work for me. Thanks!

Mahalo
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
A`ole pilikia!
0
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Xpdf - PDFinfo - Command Line Utility to Retrieve Page Count and Other Information from PDF Files
In this fourth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFinfo utility, which retrieves the contents of a PDF's Info Dictionary, as well as some other information, including the page count. We show how to isolate the page count in a plain text file, suitable for usage in a program or script.

1. Download the software.


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFinfo tool.


Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfinfo.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFinfo tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder.


Create a test folder.

Copy <pdfinfo.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called test.pdf, which is a PDF file created from my EE article, Windows 10 uses YOUR computer to help distribute itself).

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFinfo executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFinfo utility on the sample PDF file.

1
Convert Scanned Image-Only PDF Files to PDF Searchable Image Files via OCR with Power PDF Advanced
In this video, we show how to convert an image-only PDF file into a PDF Searchable Image file, that is, a file with both the image (typically from scanning) and text, which is created in an automated fashion with Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. To do this, we will set up a Watched Folder, such that whenever an image-only PDF file arrives in the Watched Folder, it will automatically be converted to a PDF Searchable Image file. We will achieve this using Power PDF, the newest product from the Document Imaging division of Nuance Communications. There are two editions of Power PDF — Standard and Advanced. The Watched Folder feature is in the Advanced edition only.

1. Download and install the trial software



Visit the Nuance website at:

http://www.nuance.com/for-business/document-imaging-and-scanning/power-pdf-converter/index.htm

Click the free trial link, which takes you here:

http://www.nuance.com/for-business/imaging-solutions/document-conversion/power-pdf-converter/free-trial/index.htm

Fill out the short form and submit it.

Download the trial software and install it.

Step1.jpg

2. Run the program and invoke the Watched Folder feature



Run the program by clicking Start>All Programs>Nuance Power PDF Advanced>Power PDF Advanced.

Invoke the Watched Folder feature by clicking the Advanced Processing menu, then the drop-down on the Batch Controls ribbon button, then Watched Folder.

Step2.jpg

3. Configure the Watched Folder settings



Tick the Enable Watched Folder box.

Click the Source button and Browse to the folder that you want as the Watched Folder.

Tick the
1
Bates Stamping/Numbering of PDF Files with Power PDF Advanced
In this video, we show how to perform Bates Numbering/Stamping of PDF documents using Power PDF Advanced, the newest product from the Document Imaging division of Nuance Communications. There are two editions of Power PDF — Standard and Advanced. The Bates Numbering/Stamping feature is in the Advanced edition only.

1. Download the trial software

Visit the Nuance website at:

http://www.nuance.com/for-business/document-imaging-and-scanning/power-pdf-converter/index.htm

Click the "Free trial" button, fill out the short form, and submit it.

Download the trial software and install it.
free trial

2. Run the program and invoke the Bates Numbering/Stamping feature.

Run the program by clicking Start>All Programs>Nuance Power PDF Advanced>Power PDF Advanced.

Invoke the Bates Numbering/Stamping feature by clicking the Edit menu, then the Bates Numbering button on the ribbon. This shows the Add and Remove choices — click Add.Add Bates feature

3. Add an entire folder of documents to be Bates Numbered/Stamped.

Click the Add Folders button and browse to the folder containing the PDF files to be Bates Numbered/Stamped.Add folder

4. Set the output options.

Click the Output button and set the output options, including the destination folder and the file naming rules.Set options

5. Set the order of the documents to be Bates Numbered.

Select a document and then click the Move Up and/or Move Down buttons to place it in the order that you want.

You may also click the Remove button to delete it from the list and the Preview button to look at it.Order documents

6. Configure the Bates options in the Header and Footer.

2
 

Expert Comment

by:WSPatton
Joe,

Is there a way to Have the FileName displayed in the Header, but in such a way that it EXCLUDES the extension (i.e. the ".pdf")?

I have hundreds of scanned PDFs that I will first batch rename using/assigning unique Exhibit numbers and then want to use a feature like Power PDF's Header & Footer Tool to have the FileName displayed in the upper right corner excluding the ".pdf", and the page number displayed in the lower right corner.  Below is a picture of what I want and attached is a PDF of what I have been able to do so far.  Any help is most welcome.Example of FileName displayed in Header.  This is what I want to do.
18-March-2016 Update:

Joe,

I also reached out to Nuance support and as yet they have not given me any useful feedback.

If it is useful, below is a link to my support ticket thread with Nuance:

http://nuance.custhelp.com/app/account/questions/detail/i_id/2307681/track/AvNquQo9Dv8S~cwxGmwe~yJ9yD0qSS75Mv_d~zj~PP9U

I am able to add headers with a FileName and footers with a Page number.

But my problem is that I want the %FileName% header to display the name of the File in such a way that it EXCLUDES the “.PDF” extension. I want the Headers to ONLY display: "Exhibit 002", "Exhibit 003", "Exhibit 004", etc..

I realize that I could manually paste the file name into the header field, but since I have hundreds of PDFs which I have to assign "Exhibit #" file names, I want to then automate the Header process by using a macro very much like Nuance's %FileName% macro, but with the appropriate code that STRIPS AWAY the ".PDF"

I look forward to hearing from you.
C-Ex-D015.pdf
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi WSPatton,

Currently, this can't be done. Two hours after reading your comment, I sent this email to my contacts at Nuance:

----- Begin message to Nuance -----
With Bates Numbering in Power PDF Advanced, inserting the macro for the file name creates the variable %FileName%. That variable contains the file name without the path but with the file extension (i.e., .PDF). Are there variables with other forms of the file name, such as the path, the file name without extension, etc. (the latter is the most important and the one I'm specifically looking for at this time)? If not, please consider the macros below for a future release. Thanks, Joe

%FileName%
File name without its path but with its extension. This is its current definition, so users already using this macro will see no change.

%FileNameNoExt%
The file name without its path, dot, and extension. As mentioned above, this is actually the main reason for this request. I have users who want the Bates stamp to contain the file name, but not the ".pdf". I included the two macros below for the sake of completeness, but right now I'd be happy with just this one new macro. Also, if there's a work-around, I'd love to hear it - can you think of any way to get the file name without the dot and extension onto each page?

%FilePath%
The file path, including drive letter with colon, but without the final backslash, even for root folders. Thus, %FilePath% followed by "\" followed by %FileName% will create the fully qualified file name.

%FileExtension%
The file extension without the dot. Presumably, this will always be PDF, unless PPA in the future can do Bates Numbering on other file types.
----- End message to Nuance -----

I'll post back here if I receive a reply from them. Btw, I was unable to access your support ticket. After logging into support and clicking on the link, I received a "Permission Denied" message. Seems that ticket threads may be viewed only by Nuance and the submitter. Regards, Joe
0
Xpdf - Convert PDF Files to Plain Text Files - Part 3
In this third video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoText utility, which converts PDF files into plain text files.

1. Download and install the software.

You may have already downloaded and installed the Xpdf tools while watching the first  or second video in the Xpdf series , but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website at:

http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the Xpdf utilities for Windows.
precompiled binaries

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.
documentation folder

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoText tool.

Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdftotext.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoText tool.
read me

4. Set up a test folder.

Create a test folder.

Copy <pdftotext.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called <RMP.pdf>).
test folder

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoText executable and the sample PDF file.
cmd prompt dir

6. Run the PDFtoText utility on the sample PDF file.

In the command prompt window, enter the following command:

pdftotext -layout samplefilename.pdf
command line

7. Verify that the text file that was created.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to show that the text file was created. There should be one text file with the same file name as the PDF file, but with a file type of TXT.
cmd prompt dir 2

8. View the text file that was created.

9
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:James Powell
Awesome tool!  Thank you for posting this.  Very useful.
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
You're welcome, James. I'm glad you find it useful. And thanks to you for the comment — authors really appreciate hearing words like that! Regards, Joe
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Xpdf - Command Line Utility for PDF Files - Part 1
In this first video of the three-part Xpdf series, we introduce and describe Xpdf, a library containing nine command line utilities that perform various functions on PDF files. We show where the library is located and how to download it, discuss its licensing provisions, and provide a brief description of each of the nine modules. We set the stage for the following two Micro Tutorials in the Xpdf series — one on the PDFimages tool and the other on PDFtoText.

1. Download and install the software.

Visit the Xpdf website at:

http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the Xpdf utilities for Windows.
precompiled binaries

2. Read the licensing agreements.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file.

Read the licensing agreements, which are in plain text files called COPYING (which is GNU GPL V2) and COPYING3 (which is GNU GPL V3) in the root of the unzipped archive.
licensing

3. If you need commercial licensing, visit the parent company's website.

For commercial licensing, visit the Glyph & Cog website:

http://www.glyphandcog.com/
glyph & cog

4. Locate the folder with the documentation.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the subfolder called <doc>.
documentation folder

5. Read all of the documentation.

Go into the <doc> folder and read the documentation. All of the files are plain text files that may be opened with any text editor, such as Notepad, or any software that can open a text file, such as Word or WordPad.
documentation

6. Locate the executables for the utilities.

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PaperPort Send To Bar - Part 1
This video is the first in a two-part series that discusses PaperPort's "Send To Bar" feature . This first video tutorial explains the purpose of the Send To Bar, how to use it, and how to hide unwanted items that are automatically created on it when PaperPort is installed. The second video tutorial in the series discusses how to add a custom icon/program to the Send To Bar.

1. Locate the Send To Bar at the bottom of the PaperPort app


Run PaperPort.

Look at the bottom of the PaperPort app and you will see something like this (depending on the version of PaperPort, the other apps that are installed, and the viewing options for the Send To Bar):

step1.jpg

2. Send an item to the Send To Bar


There are two ways to do this:

(i) Click on a desktop item (for example, a JPG file) and then click an icon on the Send To Bar (for example, Microsoft Paint).

(ii) Drag-and-drop an item (for example, a JPG file) onto an icon on the Send To Bar (for example, Microsoft Paint).

step2.jpg

3. Perform an operation on the item in the program that was launched


Continuing the example from above, let's say you have a JPG in Microsoft Paint:

step3a.jpgRotate it and save it:

step3b.jpg

4. Confirm that the item was changed in PaperPort


After saving the file in Step 3, you will be returned to PaperPort, where you should see that the item was changed (such as a rotated image).

step4.jpg

5. Hide unwanted icons on the Send To Bar


Right-click any icon on the Send To Bar and then click Send To Options.

Starting at the top of the vertical pane of icons, click on each one that you want to hide and un-check the box that says "Include icon on Send To bar".

Click OK.

step5.jpg

6. Confirm that unwanted icons have been removed from Send To Bar


The icons that you chose to hide should no longer appear on the Send To Bar
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Printers and Scanners

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A printer is a peripheral which makes a persistent human readable representation of graphics or text on paper or similar physical media. Traditional printers are being used more for special purposes, like printing photographs or artwork, and are no longer a must-have peripheral; 3D printing has become an area of intense interest, allowing the creation of physical objects. An image scanner is a device that optically scans images, printed text, handwriting, or an object, and converts it to a digital image. Hand-held scanners, where the device is moved by hand, have evolved from text scanning "wands" to 3D scanners used for industrial design, reverse engineering, test and measurement, orthotics, gaming and other applications.