Programming

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Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.

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For you the  Machine Learning fans.Microsoft Cortana Speech Recognition Now Allows You To Dictate Text In Office Apps (video):

http://flip.it/NkmwBv
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The Ultimate Checklist to Optimize Your Website
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The Ultimate Checklist to Optimize Your Website

Websites are getting bigger and complicated by the day. Video, images, custom fonts are all great for showcasing your product/service. But the price to pay in terms of reduced page load times and ultimately, decreased sales, can lead to some difficult decisions about what to cut.

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by:ProfessorJimJam
True
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by:Juana Villa
<3 FREE <3
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This is so cool! I've already gone through some of the sections in Apple's Swift Playgrounds app and loved it, but this new support for programming robotic toys looks even more amazing and fun. Great way to get kids learning programming at an early age. (Ok, who am I kidding... I want this for myself!)

Any of you check out the Swift Playgrounds app or have any of these robots? Are you teaching your kids to program?
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by:Juana Villa
That is awesome! I did not know about it. I will definitely learn more about it to show it to my nephews and nieces.
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This is an amazingly simply way to make an Electron desktop application from a webpage. I love it :D
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by:Brian Matis
And I wonder if it works with browser notifications? Those notifs can be pretty handy for something like Hipchat.
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by:Brandon Lyon
Electron has a notifications API so it could probably work if one decided to add that. I can't tell if Nativifier does that or not and I haven't tried yet.
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Here's an interesting coding puzzle:

A trader can perform two buys and two sells in a day of a given stock. An array of positive integers represents the share price of this stock at different times of the day (index i = 0 represents hour 1, i=1 represents hour 2, etc). The trader must always sell any current shares he has before he buys more shares. Write a function that determines the maximum profit the trader can make by buying and selling stock for a given day.

int maximizeProfit(int[] prices) {
   // Your code here
}

ex:
[10, 22, 5, 75, 65, 80]
The maximum profit is 87: buy at 10 sell at 22, buy at 5, sell at 80.

Open in new window


The solution should have time complexity O(n).
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This is awesome! Minecraft is already a great game, and now it can help kids learn how to code. I'm bummed this is only in the Education Edition right now, but hopefully it'll get into the normal edition sometime soon.

I also wonder what sort of new things people will create in Minecraft as a result of this... I was once building a massive suspension bridge, but it got pretty tedious and repetitive. Seems like programming a bot to carry out the construction would have been a fun project!
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by:Brian Matis
Nice! Thanks for the tip :-)
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by:Brian Matis
Wow... That's horrible; but I also admire the genius of those that figured this out...
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Is Java a terrible first programming language to learn? Do you agree with Stanford switching their intro course to JavaScript? Or would you have picked something else?

https://thenextweb.com/dd/2017/04/24/universities-finally-realize-java-bad-introductory-programming-language/#.tnw_AFXiESVy
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by:Jeffrey Dake
I definitely think there is something better to start with than Java, but not sure JavaScript is the answer.
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by:Brian Matis
I imagine the appeal of JavaScript is how you can run it in a browser and don't need to worry about dev environment setup or learning a command line to get started.

What language would you choose, Jeff?
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I just recently picked up the Humble Bundle for several Python programming eBooks. Great set of books for a really low price; can even get the basic set for as low as $1! If you've ever been thinking of learning Python, this is a pretty unbeatable deal. (I even already had a hard copy of Automate the Boring Stuff with Python but getting the eBook version as well is extra nice.)

Act fast though, less than four days to go for this deal!

(And no, I'm not even trying to get a referral bonus on this, I just think it's an awesome offer you should check out! Although, as you learn Python, I'd certainly love to have you participating in Expert Exchange to get support from the community as you run into problems or to share your accomplishments ;-)

Happy learning!

https://www.humblebundle.com/books/python-book-bundle
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What Is Transaction Monitoring and who needs it?
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What Is Transaction Monitoring and who needs it?

Synthetic Transaction Monitoring that you need for the day to day, which ensures your business website keeps running optimally, and that there is no downtime to impact your customer experience.

In discussions about what programming languages to learn, the usual suspects are generally things like Java, C++, PHP, Python, & JavaScript. Usually no one mentions a classic like COBOL, but perhaps it's time to rethink that?

https://thenextweb.com/finance/2017/04/10/ancient-programming-language-cobol-can-make-you-bank-literally/
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by:Gene Richardson
Cobol and Fortran were my first programming languages and helped make my decision to switch my college major from Electrical Engineering to Computer Science.  Some of the companies I have worked for in the last ten years still have large implementations of Cobol code.  Based upon the article, I guess I may still have some work I can do when I start collecting that Social Security check :).
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by:tliotta
COBOL was fundamental to my first professional programming job back in the early 1970s. This struck me as interesting while thinking how good my pay was in those years with COBOL, and now the pay is becoming even better, perhaps even improving for a couple decades to come. The 'pay' curve could be fun to work out by the time COBOL is gone.

As with most languages, well written COBOL might not be the most common found, and poorly written COBOL is probably easy to find. I'm pretty sure I'd feel a little embarrassed to analyze some programs I wrote 40 years ago. I know that COBOL modules that I've written in the past decade is much better quality. It hasn't been a major part of my programming work, but there've been a couple specific projects where COBOL simply did the job best. (I'm not sure how many different languages I've needed to learn in my career.)

Makes me smile to think that in a few years there might be COBOL code of mine that's still active over a half-century span.
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Here's an interesting brain teaser / programming puzzle I learned the other day. The answer can be achieved with a single line of code with computational complexity better then O(n).

N is a number that represents n boxes and n workers. All boxes are initially closed. Worker 1 goes through and toggles every box open. Worker 2 goes through and toggles every 2nd box (closed if open, open if closed). In the end, every worker i ⊂ N  has toggled every ith box opened or closed. Print the boxes that remain open at the end.

public void printOpenBoxes(n)
{
   // Implementation here
}

Open in new window

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by:Brian Matis
Fascinating! So, I'm curious, though... Did you figure this out via the underlying math of the situation, or by doing it the hard way and noticing the pattern in the results?
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by:James Bilous
I saw the answer before I could figure it out. I just thought that it was a good lesson that you should always consider a simpler version to a problem before you waste a bunch of time diving too deep into a solution that is over complicated
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I remember this like it was yesterday, being in a new position.  It always helped to try something and improve on that until it became well streamlined.

Coming into a new position expecting the work to be the same as you were taught in school or experienced it in your last position is problematic, said Gene Richardson, COO of Experts Exchange. "Each company is different, and each company will implement or code their own technology solutions," Richardson said. "Essentially, you need to drop all old habits and approach the job with an open mind while trying to both embrace and understand why they do what they do. Once you are there for at least 90 days, you can then start making suggestions on how things could be improved. Be sure you know what you are talking about and can back your stance up with facts."

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/10-bad-habits-to-break-if-you-want-to-become-a-great-developer/
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image.jpeg I know a lot of programmers who still have a hard time with abstraction. I wonder if this helps.
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Ran across this article a while back.  http://stevehanov.ca/blog/index.php?id=132 . I have been wanting to try it out for a while now. It looks like a great way to do A/B testing.
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As most of us in tech know, issues that seem like "simple" changes or problems are often anything but. Blizzard Entertainment, the developers of such games as World of Warcraft and Diablo, once wrote a fantastic blog post that went way in-depth to some of the complicated functionality behind such a "simple" thing as the damage numbers that appear in Diablo III.

What are some of your stories about "simple" things you've encountered that were much more complicated than they might appear?
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This development represents an important step forward in AI research, away from mastering tasks like voice,image recognition, and translation, and towards a more nuanced and collaborative AI that adopts a human-like method for decision-making.

Cool competition.  However, if I was capable at creating such AI, I wouldn't do it for $20,000.  I'd sell this AI to the highest bidder!

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/microsoft-competition-asks-phd-students-to-create-advanced-ai-to-play-minecraft/?ftag=TRE684d531&bhid=27457961240876229835964102892079
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Expert Comment

by:ModeIT
for the original? I find that almost hard to believe now.. I used to have a crap load of the maps. I wonder if I saved them along with the game CD. I should rip the CD on for a virtual drive so I can play without it and try to boot an old PC for the game maps..


never did play SC2 :/ it was laggy on my laptop of the time, though my current one should be fine, I wonder what I'd have to pay for a copy now a days
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by:Kyle Santos
Nice.  Yeah, BN is still very much alive.  http://us.battle.net/sc2/en/
I played the full campaigns of SC2.  It was satisfying to finally get the ending of the story.  I thought it was worth it.

You should still have the maps if you haven't wiped your OS or saved the map files on a USB thumb drive haha

CD on for a virtual drive
This.  SO MUCH.
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I've been really interested in recommendation systems lately which has lead my down a few rabbit holes. One of these landed on a similarity measurement called Jaccard similarity which is a fairly straightforward metric for communicating how many elements two sets have in common.

This turns out to be very difficult to compute without some tricks but can be estimated with a certain degree of confidence using minHashing. If this sort of thing interests you I would check out this blog post by Chris McCormick - its one of the best explanations I came across (even though its in the context of document similarity). There is even some python code provided.

I would summarize the technique in one sentence as: by randomly shuffling the union of two sets and looking at the first element in the new, shuffled set, the probability that it is an item belonging to their intersection is equal to the Jaccard Similarity.

http://mccormickml.com/2015/06/12/minhash-tutorial-with-python-code/
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Yesterday was Pi Day, and Experts Exchange held a little contest in honor of all things pi! Take a moment to read through the Pi-ku entries and leave your favorite in the comments.
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Expert Comment

by:garycase
As a mathematician, I have to go with Doug W's => he satisfied the requirements (# of syllables) with one word for each line, and did it with words relevant to pi :-)
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by:Brian Matis
Good point Gary, that one is pretty clever. :-)
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Enroll in June's Course of the Month
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Enroll in June's Course of the Month

June's Course of the Month is now available! Every 10 seconds, a consumer gets hit with ransomware. Refresh your knowledge of ransomware best practices by enrolling in this month's complimentary course for Premium Members, Team Accounts, and Qualified Experts.

When I went to school to get my degree in SE I had the importance of Java Docs beaten into me on a daily basis. Now that I am in industry, I find that Java Docs are the last place I look - instead opting for Q&A sites or google searches for blog articles due to the specificity of the problems I come across.

I was never encouraged to do this sort of research in practice, in fact, it was often discouraged. There definitely seems to be a disconnect in school professors and their outdated methods and actual industry practices. Maybe in schools that are research oriented this is better since engineering professors are actively working in their field, but at my public university I had professors who were perplexed by syntactic sugar that is now common place such as the
for ( x : y )

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loop.
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by:James Bilous
I had an interesting situation where I earned my BS and MS in computer science from the same university in a blended program ( I earned both degrees at the same time ). My school prided itself in project based learning, in fact the motto of the school was "Learn by Doing". I definitely got a great education because of this philosophy and most of the professors were great, but the ones that taught fundamentals (read 101, 102, 103 programming courses) were absolutely horrific.

By the time I hit graduate level coursework the professors were, again, fantastic. These were all instructors who were very active in industry and research and many had side companies they worked on. I think the critical missing piece from the earlier instructors was their lack of participation in the real world. Of course, all of these professors were tenured, so that should tell you something.
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Expert Comment

by:Daniella Barion
I believe that when we study the theories, we can develop better and also discuss and bring new contributions.
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I find myself defending PHP on a consistent basis and often think about the reason for all of the hate? PHP was the first language I learned in order to get into web development. Granted, the syntax isn't my favorite, but I find a lot of the prejudice is aimed the lack of structure and canned architecture which has been addressed by some great frameworks such as Laravel. Other complaints I hear are about the lack of OO in PHP which is simply untrue anymore.

However, I must admit, that even though I am an advocate of the language I do not use it for new web projects anymore (opting instead for Javascript / Express / SQL stacks), so maybe my affinity is simply misapplied nostalgia.
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by:Ray Paseur
I've just discovered this new blog-looking thingie on the E-E home page.  Looks like fun!  

Here is my favorite article about PHP.  You can agree with all of it and still get quick results with PHP, hence its popularity.
https://eev.ee/blog/2012/04/09/php-a-fractal-of-bad-design/

In unrelated matters, here's what you get if you search E-E for Gene Richardson.  Why, oh why?
no_sign_of_gene.png
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by:Bill Torchia
I have worked with PHP as the core language at a past job. We did not use a frame work because they did not exist when the company started. From that experience my opinion of PHP is that is a great language that has gotten a bad rep because of bad practices. You will see a lot of the same problems that people complain about in PHP in other, older, languages.
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There's nothing quite like a beta launch to get a bunch of people in the office hopping and finding new things we'd never seen happen before!

Just got in a patch for:
  • URLs shifting to the left of Posts in the home feed
  • "Add topics" warning disrupting flow if embedding was used in a Post

And working on tracking down a possible infinite loop as part of the setup walkthrough
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Expert Comment

by:ModeIT
Removed all cookies associated to EE fixed it for me.

MIT
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Author Comment

by:Brian Matis
Ugh... sorry that happened to you ModeIT! Glad you were able to get past it.

We've got a fix for it coming in next Monday's release. Per my understanding, logging out and back in wasn't a guaranteed workaround and the root issue was with how the system was counting the topics being followed.
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Go 1.8 has been released!

Check out the details here.
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by:Brian Matis
Saw that they have release parties... that's pretty neat! Didn't know people still did that kind of stuff. I vaguely remember going to something for one of the Mac OS X releases long ago at a local independent Mac reseller (this was before the Apple Store was in town! Maybe even before Apple Stores existed at all...)
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I'm sure most of us are pretty well aware of the huge gender gap in technology fields. But what's the root cause? This thought-provoking article posits that it's the result of computer game marketing from over 20 years ago. Did you get into technology because of computer games? I know I sure did...

Silicon Valley's gender gap is the result of computer-game marketing 20 years ago
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by:Craig Kehler
To Jeff's point I think this starts very early in a child's life and the biggest factor to shaping it is the parent's views, not the media. While it's convenient to blame the media, gender-typing is predominantly driven by their early experiences with their family. Having read a lot of articles on this subject while expecting my first child, I found it very disturbing how often my knee-jerk reaction to a question or gift or general expectation came with heavy stereotypical bias, seemingly naturally. So I agree that it's rooted deeper in the core of our culture. I think it would help for the media to try to stop furthering these biases, however it really lands on the parents shoulders to be hyper-aware of their own actions.
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by:Michael Arciniega
Relevant article about how Lego has dealt with gender issues with their own product line: How to Play Like a Girl
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Intriguing article that's pretty relevant for anyone doing Agile development. Team I'm on was just having a discussion related to this earlier today!

Scrum vs. Kanban: How to combine the best of both worlds:
https://techbeacon.com/scrum-vs-kanban-how-combine-best-both-methods
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Programming

52K

Solutions

57

Articles & Videos

40K

Contributors

Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.