Programming

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Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.

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Trending Tech Everyone Should Know About - My Thoughts
I've been thinking about this subject for a few days now, trying to come up with something unusual. But the thing that keeps coming to mind—even though I feel it's an obvious answer that everyone already does know about—is Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning.

Why? Well first, it's technology that impacts everyone, regardless of how involved you are in the tech industry. I've got little doubt that we're right on the cusp of major social change as a result of machine learning—change as significant as the Industrial Revolution. We've got self-driving cars inevitably hitting the mainstream in the near future. There's cancer detection systems that are faster and more accurate than human analysts. AI systems being trained to defend against cyberattacks. Movie dialog being written by algorithms. The list goes on and on...

And second, while these advancements will absolutely push us forward in exciting new ways, they'll also destroy many jobs. And while that job loss can be terrifying, AI opens us up for entirely new sorts of jobs, major changes to the way work is done, and more that we can't even fully conceive of yet.

Will most knowledge workers of the future become "bot wranglers"? Will some sort of universal basic income
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Author Comment

by:Scott Fell, EE MVE
I don't think I shared it for how to catch a bullshitter, but more for the good points to think about in how we work.  A lot of this may be standard operating procedures in their daily lives and others may not.  

My big takeaway is understanding the problem objectively and asking the right questions before forging ahead,.  What problem is this going to solve, what are the costs (not just $$ but time/people),

Some good points for day to day work process.
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Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Dake
I totally agree, there are some good points in there about questions we should ask ourselves before we continue developing. I have seen plenty of "refactors" that made the code more reusable but there were no plans to reuse the code. By the time another developer got the chance to reuse it, the original assumptions were no longer valid and another refactor was needed.

As developers we should always be trying to balance how we solve problems with the benefits of how we solve them.
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Premium Members & Qualified Experts,

Get HTML5 Certified in July’s Course of the Month

https://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/30614/Get-HTML5-Certified-in-July-s-Course-of-the-Month.html
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by:Christ Harold
I have already enrolled and looking forward to complete the certification. Thanks for the update
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This article tells an interesting tale of the early days of AI and going back to coding after ~30 years as a CEO.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/over-50-years-coding-still-going-tom-kehler

Yes that is my father :)
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by:Brian Matis
What a fantastic journey! Congrats to your father on his successes and contributions to the field. And for still going strong with continuing to learn. Inspiring!
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For you the  Machine Learning fans.Microsoft Cortana Speech Recognition Now Allows You To Dictate Text In Office Apps (video):

http://flip.it/NkmwBv
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Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

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Author Comment

by:ProfessorJimJam
True
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by:Juana Villa
<3 FREE <3
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This is so cool! I've already gone through some of the sections in Apple's Swift Playgrounds app and loved it, but this new support for programming robotic toys looks even more amazing and fun. Great way to get kids learning programming at an early age. (Ok, who am I kidding... I want this for myself!)

Any of you check out the Swift Playgrounds app or have any of these robots? Are you teaching your kids to program?
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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
That is awesome! I did not know about it. I will definitely learn more about it to show it to my nephews and nieces.
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This is an amazingly simply way to make an Electron desktop application from a webpage. I love it :D
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
And I wonder if it works with browser notifications? Those notifs can be pretty handy for something like Hipchat.
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Author Comment

by:Brandon Lyon
Electron has a notifications API so it could probably work if one decided to add that. I can't tell if Nativifier does that or not and I haven't tried yet.
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Here's an interesting coding puzzle:

A trader can perform two buys and two sells in a day of a given stock. An array of positive integers represents the share price of this stock at different times of the day (index i = 0 represents hour 1, i=1 represents hour 2, etc). The trader must always sell any current shares he has before he buys more shares. Write a function that determines the maximum profit the trader can make by buying and selling stock for a given day.

int maximizeProfit(int[] prices) {
   // Your code here
}

ex:
[10, 22, 5, 75, 65, 80]
The maximum profit is 87: buy at 10 sell at 22, buy at 5, sell at 80.

Open in new window


The solution should have time complexity O(n).
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This is awesome! Minecraft is already a great game, and now it can help kids learn how to code. I'm bummed this is only in the Education Edition right now, but hopefully it'll get into the normal edition sometime soon.

I also wonder what sort of new things people will create in Minecraft as a result of this... I was once building a massive suspension bridge, but it got pretty tedious and repetitive. Seems like programming a bot to carry out the construction would have been a fun project!
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by:Brian Matis
Nice! Thanks for the tip :-)
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Wow... That's horrible; but I also admire the genius of those that figured this out...
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Is Java a terrible first programming language to learn? Do you agree with Stanford switching their intro course to JavaScript? Or would you have picked something else?

https://thenextweb.com/dd/2017/04/24/universities-finally-realize-java-bad-introductory-programming-language/#.tnw_AFXiESVy
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by:Jeffrey Dake
I definitely think there is something better to start with than Java, but not sure JavaScript is the answer.
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Author Comment

by:Brian Matis
I imagine the appeal of JavaScript is how you can run it in a browser and don't need to worry about dev environment setup or learning a command line to get started.

What language would you choose, Jeff?
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I just recently picked up the Humble Bundle for several Python programming eBooks. Great set of books for a really low price; can even get the basic set for as low as $1! If you've ever been thinking of learning Python, this is a pretty unbeatable deal. (I even already had a hard copy of Automate the Boring Stuff with Python but getting the eBook version as well is extra nice.)

Act fast though, less than four days to go for this deal!

(And no, I'm not even trying to get a referral bonus on this, I just think it's an awesome offer you should check out! Although, as you learn Python, I'd certainly love to have you participating in Expert Exchange to get support from the community as you run into problems or to share your accomplishments ;-)

Happy learning!

https://www.humblebundle.com/books/python-book-bundle
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In discussions about what programming languages to learn, the usual suspects are generally things like Java, C++, PHP, Python, & JavaScript. Usually no one mentions a classic like COBOL, but perhaps it's time to rethink that?

https://thenextweb.com/finance/2017/04/10/ancient-programming-language-cobol-can-make-you-bank-literally/
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Expert Comment

by:Gene Richardson
Cobol and Fortran were my first programming languages and helped make my decision to switch my college major from Electrical Engineering to Computer Science.  Some of the companies I have worked for in the last ten years still have large implementations of Cobol code.  Based upon the article, I guess I may still have some work I can do when I start collecting that Social Security check :).
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Expert Comment

by:tliotta
COBOL was fundamental to my first professional programming job back in the early 1970s. This struck me as interesting while thinking how good my pay was in those years with COBOL, and now the pay is becoming even better, perhaps even improving for a couple decades to come. The 'pay' curve could be fun to work out by the time COBOL is gone.

As with most languages, well written COBOL might not be the most common found, and poorly written COBOL is probably easy to find. I'm pretty sure I'd feel a little embarrassed to analyze some programs I wrote 40 years ago. I know that COBOL modules that I've written in the past decade is much better quality. It hasn't been a major part of my programming work, but there've been a couple specific projects where COBOL simply did the job best. (I'm not sure how many different languages I've needed to learn in my career.)

Makes me smile to think that in a few years there might be COBOL code of mine that's still active over a half-century span.
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Here's an interesting brain teaser / programming puzzle I learned the other day. The answer can be achieved with a single line of code with computational complexity better then O(n).

N is a number that represents n boxes and n workers. All boxes are initially closed. Worker 1 goes through and toggles every box open. Worker 2 goes through and toggles every 2nd box (closed if open, open if closed). In the end, every worker i ⊂ N  has toggled every ith box opened or closed. Print the boxes that remain open at the end.

public void printOpenBoxes(n)
{
   // Implementation here
}

Open in new window

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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Fascinating! So, I'm curious, though... Did you figure this out via the underlying math of the situation, or by doing it the hard way and noticing the pattern in the results?
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Author Comment

by:James Bilous
I saw the answer before I could figure it out. I just thought that it was a good lesson that you should always consider a simpler version to a problem before you waste a bunch of time diving too deep into a solution that is over complicated
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I remember this like it was yesterday, being in a new position.  It always helped to try something and improve on that until it became well streamlined.

Coming into a new position expecting the work to be the same as you were taught in school or experienced it in your last position is problematic, said Gene Richardson, COO of Experts Exchange. "Each company is different, and each company will implement or code their own technology solutions," Richardson said. "Essentially, you need to drop all old habits and approach the job with an open mind while trying to both embrace and understand why they do what they do. Once you are there for at least 90 days, you can then start making suggestions on how things could be improved. Be sure you know what you are talking about and can back your stance up with facts."

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/10-bad-habits-to-break-if-you-want-to-become-a-great-developer/
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image.jpeg I know a lot of programmers who still have a hard time with abstraction. I wonder if this helps.
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Ran across this article a while back.  http://stevehanov.ca/blog/index.php?id=132 . I have been wanting to try it out for a while now. It looks like a great way to do A/B testing.
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As most of us in tech know, issues that seem like "simple" changes or problems are often anything but. Blizzard Entertainment, the developers of such games as World of Warcraft and Diablo, once wrote a fantastic blog post that went way in-depth to some of the complicated functionality behind such a "simple" thing as the damage numbers that appear in Diablo III.

What are some of your stories about "simple" things you've encountered that were much more complicated than they might appear?
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Programming

52K

Solutions

40K

Contributors

Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.