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Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.

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ArticlesVideosEE: Download statistics on Experts Exchange Articles and Videos - Demo of Enhancements
My 100th publication here at Experts Exchange is an article that presents a program called ArticlesVideosEE, which is able to download the Title, number of Views, number of Endorsements, number of Points, number of Comments, and Date Published for each article and video whose link is in a list. You may read the article here:

How to download number of Views, Endorsements, Points for Experts Exchange Articles and Videos

I also published a five-minute EE video Micro Tutorial with a demonstration of the program:

How to download number of Views, Endorsements, Points for Experts Exchange Articles and Videos--Demo

As you can see from the Title of the article and video, I enhanced the program after publishing the initial version to include columns for the number of Comments and the Date Published. There have also been three other enhancements:

• Ability to specify all the run-time parameters in a configuration file (config.ini) so that (i) the source code does not have to be modified to specify new options/settings and (ii) the Browse dialogs shown in the first video may be avoided.

• Support for a Command Line Interface (CLI) such that a different configuration file (not just config.ini) may be specified on the command line, thereby allowing great flexibility to run ArticlesVideosEE in a command/DOS prompt, a batch file (.bat), the Task Scheduler, programs/scripts, etc. — anywhere that a command line call can be made.

• Addition of a debugging parameter (
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LVL 29

Administrative Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Excellent video Joe and thank you or incorporating the enhancements I asked for in your program!

Endorsed!

Regards,

Andrew Leniart
Experts Exchange Senior Editorial Editor
Private Message Me
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
You're welcome, Andrew, and thanks back at you for your enhancement suggestions...definitely made the program better! Thanks, too, for the Endorsement and Approved accolade...both very much appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
Become a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert
LVL 13
Become a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert

This course teaches how to install and configure Windows Server 2012 R2.  It is the first step on your path to becoming a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE).

How to download number of Views, Endorsements, Points for Experts Exchange Articles and Videos--Demo
My 100th publication here at Experts Exchange is an article that presents a program called ArticlesVideosEE, which is able to download the Title, Views, Endorsements, and Points for each article and video whose link is in a list. You may read the article here:

How to download number of Views, Endorsements, Points for Experts Exchange Articles and Videos

This video Micro Tutorial is a supplement to that article, providing a demonstration of the program.

1. Download and install AutoHotkey


If you do not already have AutoHotkey installed, read this EE article:

AutoHotkey - Getting Started

Follow the instructions in that article to download and install AutoHotkey.

2. Download the ArticlesVideosEE program


If you have not yet downloaded the ArticlesVideosEE program, read my EE article:

How to download number of Views, Endorsements, Points for Experts Exchange Articles and Videos

Download the ArticlesVideosEE program attached at the bottom of that article.

3. Create a plain text file with the URLs of your EE articles and videos


Following the instructions in my article, use Notepad (or whatever text editor you prefer) to create a file with the URL list (each article/video URL on a separate line).

4. Run the ArticlesVideosEE program


In Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you use), double-click the ArticlesVideosEE.ahk file to run it.

The above works because a standard installation of AutoHotkey (done in Step #1) associates the .AHK file extension with the AutoHotkey program.

Respond to the Browse For Folder prompt to navigate to the folder where you want the Results file stored.

Respond to the Browse For File
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LVL 29

Administrative Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
I find this so useful to EE members that I've decided this is worthy of an Approved accolade Joe.

Congratulations and keep up the great work.

Regards,

Andrew Leniart
Experts Exchange Senior Editorial Editor
Private Message Me
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Andrew,
Thanks for the kind words, Endorsement, and Approved accolade...all very much appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
Check for and download updated file - Example - FileZilla
In a question here at Experts Exchange, a member posted this requirement:
Script to Download a File Daily if file changes or updates.
Through an exchange of posts, we clarified the requirements and decided to use the latest version of the popular FileZilla product as the test case. The solution that I present in this video Micro Tutorial is specific to FileZilla, but with minor tweaking, the method will work for other products at other sites.

I wrote the script in the AutoHotkey scripting language. If you are not familiar with it, this Experts Exchange article will get you going on it:

AutoHotkey - Getting Started

The video and the script do not address the issue of daily checking. This is easily achieved by running the script as a task in the Windows Task Scheduler, with a Trigger set for every day (or whatever frequency you want). If you are not familiar with the Task Scheduler, this EE article will get you started on it:

How to use the Windows Task Scheduler - An Introduction

1. Download and install AutoHotkey


Read this Experts Exchange article:
AutoHotkey - Getting Started

2. Download the DownloadLatestFileZilla script


Download the plain text DownloadLatestFileZilla.ahk file attached to this Step.

Use a text editor to change the DownloadFolder:="X:\FileZilla\" assignment statement to have the location that you want.

DownloadLatestFileZilla.ahk

3. Run the DownloadLatestFileZilla script


In Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you use), double-click the DownloadLatestFileZilla.ahk
1
On-Screen Display for CapsLock State (On or Off) - Enhanced
In a previous video Micro Tutorial here at Experts Exchange, I presented my CapsLockOSD program, which is a utility that constantly shows the state of the CapsLock key (ON or OFF) in the system tray. This video Micro Tutorial presents a modified version of CapsLockOSD with two enhancements: (1) the ability to create a stand-alone executable (an EXE file) that can run on a system without AutoHotkey installed and (2) an option to run automatically whenever Windows starts. If you do not require either of these new features, you may stick with the previous version of the program.

Note: The video does not demonstrate how to compile the AHK source code into an EXE file, so I've included Steps 5 and 6 below to explain that.

1. View previous EE video Micro Tutorial


This video assumes knowledge of the previous video. Please view it here:
On-Screen Display for CapsLock State (On or Off)

2. Download the enhanced CapsLockOSD program and the icon files


Download the plain text CapsLockOSD.ahk file attached to this Step.

Download the CapsLockOSD.ico, CapsLockOFF.ico, and CapsLockON.ico icon files attached to this Step.

Put all four files in the same folder.

CapsLockOSD.ahk
CapsLockOSD.ico
CapsLockOFF.ico
CapsLockON.ico

3. Test the previous features


Test all the features of CapsLockOSD as shown in my previous video to confirm that they all work correctly in this enhanced version.

4. Test the new feature that starts CapsLockOSD with Windows


Right-click the CapsLockOSD icon, then left-click Start with Windows.

Right-click the CapsLockOSD icon again and confirm that the Start with Windows menu item is checked.

Restart Windows and confirm that CapsLockOSD is running.

5. Compile the CapsLockOSD program

2
On-Screen Display for CapsLock State (On or Off)
In a thread here at Experts Exchange, a member posted this question:
I use a wireless keyboard. I need a utility that will constantly display the state of the caps lock key on my monitor. ... Can anyone recommend a program that will accomplish this for me?
The AutoHotkey program that I present in this video (called CapsLockOSD) accomplishes the task.

Update on 19-May-2019: I enhanced CapsLockOSD with two features: (1) the ability to create a stand-alone executable (an EXE file) that can run on a system without AutoHotkey installed and (2) an option to run automatically whenever Windows starts. If you require either of these new features, please visit my new video Micro Tutorial:

On-Screen Display for CapsLock State (On or Off) - Enhanced

However, please view this video first, as it lays the groundwork for the new video. Of course, if you do not require either of the new features, you may stick with the version presented in this video.

1. Download and install AutoHotkey


If you do not already have AutoHotkey installed, read this Experts Exchange article:
AutoHotkey - Getting Started

2. Download the CapsLockOSD program and the icon files


Download the plain text CapsLockOSD.ahk file attached to this Step.

Download the CapsLockOFF.ico and CapsLockON.ico icon files attached to this Step.

Put all three files in the same folder.

CapsLockOSD.ahk
CapsLockOFF.ico
CapsLockON.ico

3. Run the CapsLockOSD program


In Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you use), double-click the CapsLockOSD.ahk file to run it.

The above works because a standard installation of AutoHotkey (done in Step 1) associates the AHK
1
Xpdf - PDFtoPS - Command Line Utility to Convert a PDF File to PS (PostScript)
In this tenth video of my Xpdf series, I discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoPS utility, which converts a PDF file to PostScript (PS). Also, it provides an option allowing creation of an Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file. It performs its functions via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded the Xpdf tools while watching one of my earlier videos in the series, but there has since been an upgrade from Version 3 to Version 4 and there is a new download site:

https://www.xpdfreader.com/download.html

Visit that site and download the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive, then unzip it.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoPS tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdftops.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoPS tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftops.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoPS executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFtoPS utility to create the PostScript file


Issue the following command in the command prompt:

pdftops TestFileName.pdf
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LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Great video and introduction to a very useful tool indeed.
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Thank you, Andrew, I appreciate the compliment and the endorsement. Happy New Year! Regards, Joe
0
Xpdf - PDFtoPPM - Command Line Utility to Convert a PDF File to PPM, PGM, PBM
In this ninth video of my Xpdf series, I discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoPPM tool, which converts a PDF file to color portable pixmap (PPM) format, grayscale portable graymap (PGM) format, or monochrome (black & white) portable bitmap (PBM) format. It creates a separate image file for each page of the PDF file. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded the Xpdf tools while watching one of my earlier videos in the series, but there has since been an upgrade from Version 3 to Version 4 and there is a new download site:

https://www.xpdfreader.com/download.html

Visit that site and download the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive, then unzip it.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoPPM tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdftoppm.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoPPM tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftoppm.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder, preferably one with numerous pages.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoPPM executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5
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Xpdf - PDFtoHTML - Command Line Utility to Convert a PDF File to HTML
In this eighth video of my Xpdf series, I discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoHTML utility, which, exactly as its name says, converts a PDF file to HTML. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded the Xpdf tools while watching one of my earlier videos in the series, but there has since been an upgrade from Version 3 to Version 4 and there is a new download site:

https://www.xpdfreader.com/download.html

Visit that site and download the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive, then unzip it.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoHTML tool


Go into the doc folder and find the pdftohtml.txt file.

It is a plain text file. Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoHTML tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftohtml.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder, preferably one with numerous pages.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoHTML executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFtoHTML utility


Issue the following command in the command prompt:

pdftohtml TestFileName.pdf HTMLfolder
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xpdfrc - Configuration File for All Xpdf Utilities
This is the eleventh — and final — video of my Experts Exchange Micro Tutorials on the Xpdf utilities. The first video is an overview of the command line tools. The next nine videos are tutorials on all them:

PDFimages - Extract Images from PDF Files
PDFtoText - Convert PDF Files to Plain Text Files
PDFinfo - Retrieve Page Count and Other Information from PDF Files
PDFdetach - Detach Attachments from PDF Files
PDFtoPNG - Convert a Multi-page PDF File into Separate PNG Files
PDFfonts - List Fonts Used in a PDF File
PDFtoHTML - Convert a PDF File to HTML
PDFtoPPM - Convert a PDF File to PPM, PGM, PBM
PDFtoPS - Convert a PDF File to PS (PostScript)

This last video in the series discusses xpdfrc, which is the single configuration file that Xpdf uses for all nine utilities. It provides an enormous number of options, allowing extensive control of the tools, such as character mapping, font configuration, PostScript control, rasterizer settings, text control, and much more.

1. Download the software and fonts


You may have already downloaded the Xpdf tools while watching one of my earlier videos in the series, but there has since been an upgrade from Version 3 to Version 4 and there is a new download site:

https://www.xpdfreader.com/download.html

Visit that site and download the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive, then unzip it.

Download the Symbol and Zapf Dingbats fonts from the same page.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2
1
Screencast - Getting to Know the Pipeline
Screencast - Getting to Know the Pipeline
1

Expert Comment

by:String :-)
Great video thanks. would be useful to copy the text into the comments. Cheers
0
CompTIA Cloud+
LVL 13
CompTIA Cloud+

The CompTIA Cloud+ Basic training course will teach you about cloud concepts and models, data storage, networking, and network infrastructure.

Loops Section Overview
Loops Section Overview
1
How to divide/split a single image file into multiple image files
In an interesting question here at Experts Exchange, a member asked how to split a single image into multiple images. The primary usage for this is to place many photographs on a flatbed scanner and scan all of them into a single image file, but then easily split the single image file into multiple image files, one for each photo. The photos will be placed on the flatbed scanner with ample separation so that there is enough "white space" for the splitting software to separate the images. Of course, the solution may be used on any image that contains multiple images in it, that is, not necessarily scanned photos, as long as there is enough of a separation between images for the splitting software to detect the individual images. The solution presented in this video Micro Tutorial uses the excellent (free!) GIMP software and a filter (plugin/script) called Divide Scanned Images. Kudos to both the GIMP developers and Rob Antonishen, who developed DivideScannedImages and BatchDivideScannedImages.

Important Update on 13-May-2019: The link to the DivideScannedImages script that is shown in the video and in the paragraph above no longer works. However, I have the script, and it is legal to post it here because of its license, as follows:
License:

; This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
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LVL 96

Expert Comment

by:nobus
as usual, a very good tutorial, and a very helpful teacher
thanks Joe for solving my problem
1
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
You're welcome, nobus — and thanks to you for the compliment and the endorsement — both very much appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
How to add custom Run command to Notepad++ for AutoHotkey and other programming/scripting languages
In a recent question here at Experts Exchange, a member asked how to run an AutoHotkey script (.AHK) directly from Notepad++ (aka NPP). This video Micro Tutorial shows how to do it by adding a custom Run command to NPP. The method may easily be extended to any programming/scripting language that is callable via the command line with a parameter for the source code file name. A second example of this technique is included in the video for running a batch file (.BAT) in NPP.

1. Click the Run menu, then click the first item — Run...


After running NPP and performing the actions above, you will have this dialog:

Step1

2. Browse to the AutoHotkey executable


Click the ... button and navigate to AutoHotkey.exe, which is in C:\Program Files\AutoHotkey\ in a standard installation (but may, of course, be in a different folder on your system).

Step2

3. Add a parameter for the full path of the file in the current tab


You will now have this dialog box:

Step3a
Go to the end of the AutoHotkey.exe file name in the box and add this (including the quote marks):

"$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"

Be sure to make it all upper case.

Step3b

4. Save the new Run command


Click the Save... button, which gives you this dialog:

Step4
Give the new, custom Run command a name (I chose AHK in the video) and assign it to a hotkey (if you wish) by ticking CTRL and/or ALT and/or SHIFT, then one of the keys in the drop-down. When you have an OK button that is not grayed out, click it, then click Cancel to close the dialog.

5. Repeat Steps 1-4 for other programming/scripting languages


The video shows how to do it for batch (BAT) files, namely:

cmd /c "$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"

You may, of course, do it for other programming/scripting languages.

Step5
2
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Nice.  I use AutoHotKeys and NotePad++ and they're great programs for what I do at my job.  Good video, Joe!
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Kyle,
Thanks for the compliment and the endorsement — both very much appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
Starting up a Project Part 1
Starting up a Project
0
Introduction to Processes Part 1
Introduction to Processes
0
Progress Part 1
Progress
0
Control Phase - 5.3 Six Sigma Control Plans
Six Sigma Control Plans
0
Improve Phase - 4.1 Simple Linear Regression
Simple Linear Regression
0
Xpdf - PDFfonts - Command Line Utility to List Fonts Used in a PDF File
In this seventh video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFfonts utility, which lists all the fonts used in a PDF file. In addition to the name of the font, it shows the font type and whether or not the font is embedded in the PDF file (and, if embedded, whether or not it is a subset), along with other font information that is discussed in the documentation file. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFfonts tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdffonts.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFfonts tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdffonts.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a couple of sample PDF files into your test folder, preferably ones with many different fonts.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing

2
LVL 19

Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Congratulations!  Your video has been Accepted and is now published on Experts Exchange.  Thank you for your contributions.
1
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Kyle,
Thanks for publishing and upvoting — both appreciated! Regards, Joe
1
Ensure you’re charging the right price for your IT
Ensure you’re charging the right price for your IT

Do you wonder if your IT business is truly profitable or if you should raise your prices? Learn how to calculate your overhead burden using our free interactive tool and use it to determine the right price for your IT services. Start calculating Now!

Xpdf - PDFtoPNG - Command Line Utility to Convert a Multi-page PDF File into Separate PNG Files
In this sixth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoPNG utility, which converts a multi-page PDF file to separate color, grayscale, or monochrome PNG files, creating one PNG file for each page in the PDF. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoPNG tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdftopng.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoPNG tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftopng.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder. Of course, it will work fine with a one-page PDF file, but it is more instructive to test it with a multi-page PDF.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoPNG executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFtoPNG utility

1
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Kyle,
Thanks for the fast publishing and the compliment — both appreciated! Regards, Joe
1
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Tia Henderson,
I'm sure that you meant to endorse this video (rather than Kyle's comment that it was Accepted and my comment thanking Kyle). To endorse the video, you must click the thumbs-up icon that is right underneath the video steps (before this Comments section begins). Thanks, Joe
0
Xpdf - PDFdetach - Command Line Utility to Detach Attachments from PDF Files
In this fifth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFdetach utility, which is able to list and, more importantly, extract attachments that are embedded in PDF files. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software.


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFdetach tool.


Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfdetach.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFdetach tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder.


Create a test folder.

Copy <pdfdetach.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file that has attachments into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called test.pdf, which is a PDF file created from my EE article, Windows 10 uses YOUR computer to help distribute itself, but with some attachments added to it).

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

4
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:NVIT
Hi Joe...

> A way to achieve that is to extract first with PDFdetach and then print the file to a PDF print driver.

That would work for me. Thanks!

Mahalo
1
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
A`ole pilikia!
0
Xpdf - PDFinfo - Command Line Utility to Retrieve Page Count and Other Information from PDF Files
In this fourth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFinfo utility, which retrieves the contents of a PDF file's Info Dictionary, as well as some other information (metadata), including the page count. We show how to isolate the page count in a plain text file, and the same method may be used to isolate other metadata fields, such as the Author and PDF Producer. PDFinfo provides a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software.


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFinfo tool.


Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfinfo.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFinfo tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder.


Create a test folder.

Copy <pdfinfo.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called test.pdf, which is a PDF file created from my EE article, Windows 10 uses YOUR computer to help distribute itself).

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

3
Installing Eclipse
Viewers will learn how to properly install Eclipse with the necessary JDK, and will take a look at an introductory Java program.

1. Download Eclipse installation zip file

2. Extract files from zip file

3. Download and install JDK 8

4. Open Eclipse and select workbench location

5. Start new Java Project (Start new class, Code basic Hello World program, Save file, Run as Java application)

2
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Great job!
0

Expert Comment

by:jessesmith smith
For windows
1.Install JDK
To use Eclipse for Java programming, you need to first install Java Development Kit (JDK).
Read  " How to Install JDK (on Windows)".
2.Download
Download Eclipse from http://www.eclipse.org/downloads
3: Unzip
To install Eclipse, simply unzip the downloaded file into a directory of your choice
There is no need to run any installer.
0
Xpdf - PDFtoText - Convert PDF Files to Plain Text Files
This third video of my Xpdf series discusses and demonstrates the PDFtoText utility, which converts PDF files into plain text files. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

You'll see that this video says it is "Part 3 of 3". However, after publishing the first three tutorials, I decided to do one for each of the other tools, as well as one for the Xpdf configuration file (xpdfrc). Links to all of the videos are in the first video in this series.

1. Download and install the software.

You may have already downloaded and installed the Xpdf tools while watching the first  or second video in the Xpdf series , but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website at:

http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the Xpdf utilities for Windows.
precompiled binaries

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.
documentation folder

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoText tool.

Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdftotext.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoText tool.
read me

4. Set up a test folder.

Create a test folder.

Copy <pdftotext.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called <RMP.pdf>).
test folder

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Great tutorial series. This will be very handy for me!
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Andrew,
I'm glad to hear that my Xpdf series will be useful for you. This particular one, PDFtoText, is the one that I use the most in my custom programs. Cheers, Joe
P.S. Thanks for the endorsement!
0
Xpdf - PDFimages - Extract Images from PDF Files
This second video of my Xpdf series discusses and demonstrates the PDFimages utility, which, in a single command, is able to extract all the images from a PDF file and save each one in a separate image file (PBM, PPM, or JPG). It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

You'll see that this video says it is "Part 2 of 3". However, after publishing the first three tutorials, I decided to do one for each of the other tools, as well as one for the Xpdf configuration file (xpdfrc). Links to all of the videos are in the first video in this series.

1. Download and install the software.

You may have already downloaded and installed the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website at:

http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the Xpdf utilities for Windows.
precompiled binaries

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.
documentation folder

3. Read the documentation for the PDFimages tool.

Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfimages.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFimages tool.
read me

4. Set up a test folder.

7
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Great video. You make it easy Joe, thanks for sharing!
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
You're welcome, Andrew, and thanks to you for the kind words and the endorsement — both appreciated! Regards, Joe
0

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