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Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.

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How to add custom Run command to Notepad++ for AutoHotkey and other programming/scripting languages
In a recent question here at Experts Exchange, a member asked how to run an AutoHotkey script (.AHK) directly from Notepad++ (aka NPP). This video Micro Tutorial shows how to do it by adding a custom Run command to NPP. The method may easily be extended to any programming/scripting language that is callable via the command line with a parameter for the source code file name. A second example of this technique is included in the video for running a batch file (.BAT) in NPP.

1. Click the Run menu, then click the first item — Run...


After running NPP and performing the actions above, you will have this dialog:

Step1

2. Browse to the AutoHotkey executable


Click the ... button and navigate to AutoHotkey.exe, which is in C:\Program Files\AutoHotkey\ in a standard installation (but may, of course, be in a different folder on your system).

Step2

3. Add a parameter for the full path of the file in the current tab


You will now have this dialog box:

Step3a
Go to the end of the AutoHotkey.exe file name in the box and add this (including the quote marks):

"$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"

Be sure to make it all upper case.

Step3b

4. Save the new Run command


Click the Save... button, which gives you this dialog:

Step4
Give the new, custom Run command a name (I chose AHK in the video) and assign it to a hotkey (if you wish) by ticking CTRL and/or ALT and/or SHIFT, then one of the keys in the drop-down. When you have an OK button that is not grayed out, click it, then click Cancel to close the dialog.

5. Repeat Steps 1-4 for other programming/scripting languages


The video shows how to do it for batch (BAT) files, namely:

cmd /c "$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"

You may, of course, do it for other programming/scripting languages.

Step5
2
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Nice.  I use AutoHotKeys and NotePad++ and they're great programs for what I do at my job.  Good video, Joe!
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Kyle,
Thanks for the compliment and the endorsement — both very much appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
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Starting up a Project Part 1
Starting up a Project
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Introduction to Processes Part 1
Introduction to Processes
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Progress Part 1
Progress
0
Control Phase - 5.3 Six Sigma Control Plans
Six Sigma Control Plans
0
Improve Phase - 4.1 Simple Linear Regression
Simple Linear Regression
0
Xpdf - PDFfonts - Command Line Utility to List Fonts Used in a PDF File
In this seventh video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFfonts utility, which lists all the fonts used in a PDF file. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made. In addition to the name of the font, it shows the font type and whether or not the font is embedded in the PDF file (and, if embedded, whether or not it is a subset), along with other font information that is discussed in the documentation file.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFfonts tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdffonts.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFfonts tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdffonts.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a couple of sample PDF files into your test folder, preferably ones with many different fonts.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing

2
 
LVL 17

Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Congratulations!  Your video has been Accepted and is now published on Experts Exchange.  Thank you for your contributions.
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Kyle,
Thanks for publishing and upvoting — both appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
Xpdf - PDFdetach - Command Line Utility to Detach Attachments from PDF Files
In this fifth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFdetach utility, which is able to list and, more importantly, extract attachments that are embedded in PDF files. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software.


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFdetach tool.


Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfdetach.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFdetach tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder.


Create a test folder.

Copy <pdfdetach.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file that has attachments into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called test.pdf, which is a PDF file created from my EE article, Windows 10 uses YOUR computer to help distribute itself, but with some attachments added to it).

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

3
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:NVIT
Hi Joe...

> A way to achieve that is to extract first with PDFdetach and then print the file to a PDF print driver.

That would work for me. Thanks!

Mahalo
0
 
LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
A`ole pilikia!
0
Xpdf - PDFinfo - Command Line Utility to Retrieve Page Count and Other Information from PDF Files
In this fourth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFinfo utility, which retrieves the contents of a PDF's Info Dictionary, as well as some other information, including the page count. We show how to isolate the page count in a plain text file, suitable for usage in a program or script.

1. Download the software.


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFinfo tool.


Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfinfo.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFinfo tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder.


Create a test folder.

Copy <pdfinfo.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called test.pdf, which is a PDF file created from my EE article, Windows 10 uses YOUR computer to help distribute itself).

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFinfo executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFinfo utility on the sample PDF file.

1
Installing Eclipse
Viewers will learn how to properly install Eclipse with the necessary JDK, and will take a look at an introductory Java program.

1. Download Eclipse installation zip file

2. Extract files from zip file

3. Download and install JDK 8

4. Open Eclipse and select workbench location

5. Start new Java Project (Start new class, Code basic Hello World program, Save file, Run as Java application)

2
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Great job!
0
 

Expert Comment

by:jessesmith smith
For windows
1.Install JDK
To use Eclipse for Java programming, you need to first install Java Development Kit (JDK).
Read  " How to Install JDK (on Windows)".
2.Download
Download Eclipse from http://www.eclipse.org/downloads
3: Unzip
To install Eclipse, simply unzip the downloaded file into a directory of your choice
There is no need to run any installer.
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Introduction to Java Syntax
An introduction to basic programming syntax in Java by creating a simple program. Viewers can follow the tutorial as they create their first class in Java. Definitions and explanations about each element are given to help prepare viewers for future learning. Additionally, extra information is given in case a viewer wishes to explore and expand on the tutorial.

1. Create class

2. Define “public”

3. Create main

4. Define “static” and “void”

5. Brackets and finish skeleton

6. Printing text

7. Compile and Run

8. Additional Info

1

Programming

52K

Solutions

40K

Contributors

Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.