Programming

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Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.

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Xpdf - PDFtoPS - Command Line Utility to Convert a PDF File to PS (PostScript)
In this tenth video of my Xpdf series, I discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoPS utility, which converts a PDF file to PostScript (PS). Also, it provides an option allowing creation of an Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file. It performs its functions via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded the Xpdf tools while watching one of my earlier videos in the series, but there has since been an upgrade from Version 3 to Version 4 and there is a new download site:

https://www.xpdfreader.com/download.html

Visit that site and download the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive, then unzip it.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoPS tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdftops.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoPS tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftops.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoPS executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFtoPS utility to create the PostScript file


Issue the following command in the command prompt:

pdftops TestFileName.pdf
1
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Great video and introduction to a very useful tool indeed.
0
LVL 63

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Thank you, Andrew, I appreciate the compliment and the endorsement. Happy New Year! Regards, Joe
0
Ensure Business Longevity with As-A-Service
Ensure Business Longevity with As-A-Service

Using the as-a-service approach for your business model allows you to grow your revenue stream with new practice areas, without forcing you to part ways with existing clients just because they don’t fit the mold of your new service offerings.

Xpdf - PDFtoPPM - Command Line Utility to Convert a PDF File to PPM, PGM, PBM
In this ninth video of my Xpdf series, I discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoPPM tool, which converts a PDF file to color portable pixmap (PPM) format, grayscale portable graymap (PGM) format, or monochrome (black & white) portable bitmap (PBM) format. It creates a separate image file for each page of the PDF file. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded the Xpdf tools while watching one of my earlier videos in the series, but there has since been an upgrade from Version 3 to Version 4 and there is a new download site:

https://www.xpdfreader.com/download.html

Visit that site and download the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive, then unzip it.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoPPM tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdftoppm.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoPPM tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftoppm.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder, preferably one with numerous pages.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoPPM executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5
1
Xpdf - PDFtoHTML - Command Line Utility to Convert a PDF File to HTML
In this eighth video of my Xpdf series, I discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoHTML utility, which, exactly as its name says, converts a PDF file to HTML. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded the Xpdf tools while watching one of my earlier videos in the series, but there has since been an upgrade from Version 3 to Version 4 and there is a new download site:

https://www.xpdfreader.com/download.html

Visit that site and download the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive, then unzip it.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoHTML tool


Go into the doc folder and find the pdftohtml.txt file.

It is a plain text file. Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoHTML tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftohtml.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder, preferably one with numerous pages.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoHTML executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFtoHTML utility


Issue the following command in the command prompt:

pdftohtml TestFileName.pdf HTMLfolder
2
xpdfrc - Configuration File for All Xpdf Utilities
This is the eleventh — and final — video of my Experts Exchange Micro Tutorials on the Xpdf utilities. The first video is an overview of the command line tools. The next nine videos are tutorials on all them:

PDFimages - Extract Images from PDF Files
PDFtoText - Convert PDF Files to Plain Text Files
PDFinfo - Retrieve Page Count and Other Information from PDF Files
PDFdetach - Detach Attachments from PDF Files
PDFtoPNG - Convert a Multi-page PDF File into Separate PNG Files
PDFfonts - List Fonts Used in a PDF File
PDFtoHTML - Convert a PDF File to HTML
PDFtoPPM - Convert a PDF File to PPM, PGM, PBM
PDFtoPS - Convert a PDF File to PS (PostScript)

This last video in the series discusses xpdfrc, which is the single configuration file that Xpdf uses for all nine utilities. It provides an enormous number of options, allowing extensive control of the tools, such as character mapping, font configuration, PostScript control, rasterizer settings, text control, and much more.

1. Download the software and fonts


You may have already downloaded the Xpdf tools while watching one of my earlier videos in the series, but there has since been an upgrade from Version 3 to Version 4 and there is a new download site:

https://www.xpdfreader.com/download.html

Visit that site and download the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive, then unzip it.

Download the Symbol and Zapf Dingbats fonts from the same page.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2
1
Screencast - Getting to Know the Pipeline
Screencast - Getting to Know the Pipeline
1

Expert Comment

by:String :-)
Great video thanks. would be useful to copy the text into the comments. Cheers
0
Loops Section Overview
Loops Section Overview
1
How to add custom Run command to Notepad++ for AutoHotkey and other programming/scripting languages
In a recent question here at Experts Exchange, a member asked how to run an AutoHotkey script (.AHK) directly from Notepad++ (aka NPP). This video Micro Tutorial shows how to do it by adding a custom Run command to NPP. The method may easily be extended to any programming/scripting language that is callable via the command line with a parameter for the source code file name. A second example of this technique is included in the video for running a batch file (.BAT) in NPP.

1. Click the Run menu, then click the first item — Run...


After running NPP and performing the actions above, you will have this dialog:

Step1

2. Browse to the AutoHotkey executable


Click the ... button and navigate to AutoHotkey.exe, which is in C:\Program Files\AutoHotkey\ in a standard installation (but may, of course, be in a different folder on your system).

Step2

3. Add a parameter for the full path of the file in the current tab


You will now have this dialog box:

Step3a
Go to the end of the AutoHotkey.exe file name in the box and add this (including the quote marks):

"$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"

Be sure to make it all upper case.

Step3b

4. Save the new Run command


Click the Save... button, which gives you this dialog:

Step4
Give the new, custom Run command a name (I chose AHK in the video) and assign it to a hotkey (if you wish) by ticking CTRL and/or ALT and/or SHIFT, then one of the keys in the drop-down. When you have an OK button that is not grayed out, click it, then click Cancel to close the dialog.

5. Repeat Steps 1-4 for other programming/scripting languages


The video shows how to do it for batch (BAT) files, namely:

cmd /c "$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"

You may, of course, do it for other programming/scripting languages.

Step5
2
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Nice.  I use AutoHotKeys and NotePad++ and they're great programs for what I do at my job.  Good video, Joe!
0
LVL 63

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Kyle,
Thanks for the compliment and the endorsement — both very much appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
Starting up a Project Part 1
Starting up a Project
0
Introduction to Processes Part 1
Introduction to Processes
0
Progress Part 1
Progress
0
Acronis Global Cyber Summit 2019 in Miami
 Acronis Global Cyber Summit 2019 in Miami

The Acronis Global Cyber Summit 2019 will be held at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach Resort on October 13–16, 2019, and it promises to be the must-attend event for IT infrastructure managers, CIOs, service providers, value-added resellers, ISVs, and developers.

Control Phase - 5.3 Six Sigma Control Plans
Six Sigma Control Plans
0
Improve Phase - 4.1 Simple Linear Regression
Simple Linear Regression
0
Xpdf - PDFfonts - Command Line Utility to List Fonts Used in a PDF File
In this seventh video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFfonts utility, which lists all the fonts used in a PDF file. In addition to the name of the font, it shows the font type and whether or not the font is embedded in the PDF file (and, if embedded, whether or not it is a subset), along with other font information that is discussed in the documentation file. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFfonts tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdffonts.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFfonts tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdffonts.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a couple of sample PDF files into your test folder, preferably ones with many different fonts.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing

2
LVL 19

Administrative Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Congratulations!  Your video has been Accepted and is now published on Experts Exchange.  Thank you for your contributions.
1
LVL 63

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Kyle,
Thanks for publishing and upvoting — both appreciated! Regards, Joe
1
Xpdf - PDFtoPNG - Command Line Utility to Convert a Multi-page PDF File into Separate PNG Files
In this sixth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFtoPNG utility, which converts a multi-page PDF file to separate color, grayscale, or monochrome PNG files, creating one PNG file for each page in the PDF. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the doc folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoPNG tool


Go into the doc folder and find the plain text file called pdftopng.txt.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoPNG tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder


Create a test folder.

Copy pdftopng.exe from the unzipped bin32 folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder. Of course, it will work fine with a one-page PDF file, but it is more instructive to test it with a multi-page PDF.

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing


Open a command prompt window.

Navigate to your test folder.

Issue a DIR command in the command prompt to be sure that only two files are in it - the PDFtoPNG executable and the sample PDF file.

Step5

6. Run the PDFtoPNG utility

1
LVL 63

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Kyle,
Thanks for the fast publishing and the compliment — both appreciated! Regards, Joe
1
LVL 63

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Tia Henderson,
I'm sure that you meant to endorse this video (rather than Kyle's comment that it was Accepted and my comment thanking Kyle). To endorse the video, you must click the thumbs-up icon that is right underneath the video steps (before this Comments section begins). Thanks, Joe
0
Xpdf - PDFdetach - Command Line Utility to Detach Attachments from PDF Files
In this fifth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFdetach utility, which is able to list and, more importantly, extract attachments that are embedded in PDF files. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software.


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFdetach tool.


Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfdetach.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFdetach tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder.


Create a test folder.

Copy <pdfdetach.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file that has attachments into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called test.pdf, which is a PDF file created from my EE article, Windows 10 uses YOUR computer to help distribute itself, but with some attachments added to it).

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

4
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:NVIT
Hi Joe...

> A way to achieve that is to extract first with PDFdetach and then print the file to a PDF print driver.

That would work for me. Thanks!

Mahalo
1
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
A`ole pilikia!
0
Xpdf - PDFinfo - Command Line Utility to Retrieve Page Count and Other Information from PDF Files
In this fourth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFinfo utility, which retrieves the contents of a PDF file's Info Dictionary, as well as some other information (metadata), including the page count. We show how to isolate the page count in a plain text file, and the same method may be used to isolate other metadata fields, such as the Author and PDF Producer. PDFinfo provides a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

1. Download the software.


You may have already downloaded and unzipped the Xpdf tools while watching the first video in the Xpdf series, but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website. Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the utilities for Windows.

Step1

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.


Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.

Step2

3. Read the documentation for the PDFinfo tool.


Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdfinfo.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFinfo tool.

Step3

4. Set up a test folder.


Create a test folder.

Copy <pdfinfo.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called test.pdf, which is a PDF file created from my EE article, Windows 10 uses YOUR computer to help distribute itself).

Step4

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

3
Installing Eclipse
Viewers will learn how to properly install Eclipse with the necessary JDK, and will take a look at an introductory Java program.

1. Download Eclipse installation zip file

2. Extract files from zip file

3. Download and install JDK 8

4. Open Eclipse and select workbench location

5. Start new Java Project (Start new class, Code basic Hello World program, Save file, Run as Java application)

2
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Great job!
0

Expert Comment

by:jessesmith smith
For windows
1.Install JDK
To use Eclipse for Java programming, you need to first install Java Development Kit (JDK).
Read  " How to Install JDK (on Windows)".
2.Download
Download Eclipse from http://www.eclipse.org/downloads
3: Unzip
To install Eclipse, simply unzip the downloaded file into a directory of your choice
There is no need to run any installer.
0
Xpdf - PDFtoText - Convert PDF Files to Plain Text Files
This third video of my Xpdf series discusses and demonstrates the PDFtoText utility, which converts PDF files into plain text files. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made.

You'll see that this video says it is "Part 3 of 3". However, after publishing the first three tutorials, I decided to do one for each of the other tools, as well as one for the Xpdf configuration file (xpdfrc). Links to all of the videos are in the first video in this series.

1. Download and install the software.

You may have already downloaded and installed the Xpdf tools while watching the first  or second video in the Xpdf series , but if you haven't, then visit the Xpdf website at:

http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the Xpdf utilities for Windows.
precompiled binaries

2. Locate the documentation folder for the Xpdf utilities.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the <doc> folder.
documentation folder

3. Read the documentation for the PDFtoText tool.

Go into the <doc> folder and find the plain text file called <pdftotext.txt>.

Open it with any text editor, such as Notepad, and read it. This is the documentation for the PDFtoText tool.
read me

4. Set up a test folder.

Create a test folder.

Copy <pdftotext.exe> from the unzipped <bin32> folder into your test folder.

Copy a sample PDF file into your test folder (in the video and the screenshots below, the file is called <RMP.pdf>).
test folder

5. Set up a command prompt for testing.

10
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Great tutorial series. This will be very handy for me!
0
LVL 63

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Andrew,
I'm glad to hear that my Xpdf series will be useful for you. This particular one, PDFtoText, is the one that I use the most in my custom programs. Cheers, Joe
P.S. Thanks for the endorsement!
0
Xpdf - Command Line Utilities for PDF Files
This first video Micro Tutorial in my Xpdf series introduces and describes Xpdf, a library containing nine command line utilities that perform various functions on PDF files. This video shows where the library is located and how to download it, discusses its licensing provisions, and provides a brief description of each of the nine modules.

Since all the utilities offer a command line interface, they are suitable for use in batch files, programs, and scripts — any place where a command line call can be made. For example, I have written many programs in the AutoHotkey scripting language that call the various Xpdf utilities via the AutoHotkey RunWait command.

This first video sets the stage for subsequent Micro Tutorials in the Xpdf series. You'll see that this video says it is "Part 1 of 3" (the second says, "Part 2 of 3"; the third, "Part 3 of 3"). However, after publishing the first three tutorials, I decided to do one for each of the other tools, as well as one for the Xpdf configuration file (xpdfrc), which is common to all nine utilities. Here are links to the other 10 five-minute video Micro Tutorials at Experts Exchange:

Xpdf - PDFimages - Command Line Utility to Extract Images from PDF Files
Xpdf - PDFtoText - Command Line Utility to Convert PDF Files to Plain Text Files
Xpdf - PDFinfo - Command Line Utility to Retrieve Page Count and Other Information from PDF Files
Xpdf - PDFdetach - Command Line Utility to Detach Attachments from PDF Files
7
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Great video Joe! Excellent tool I had no idea existed.
0
LVL 63

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Thanks, Andrew, I appreciate the compliment...and the endorsement! Regards, Joe
0

Programming

53K

Solutions

41K

Contributors

Programming includes both the specifics of the language you’re using, like Visual Basic, .NET, Java and others, but also the best practices in user experience and interfaces and the management of projects, version control and development. Other programming topics are related to web and cloud development and system and hardware programming.