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Project Management

Project management is the discipline of carefully projecting or planning, organizing, motivating and controlling resources to achieve specific goals and meet specific success criteria. A project is a temporary endeavor designed to produce a unique product, service or result with a defined beginning and end (usually time-constrained, and often constrained by funding or deliverables) undertaken to meet unique goals and objectives, typically to bring about beneficial change or added value.

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JIRA: Removing old sprints from migrated ticket to resolve a velocity chart issue
Ran into an interesting problem in JIRA that I managed to solve this morning. Figured it might help out others, so here goes!

It turns out that if you had a ticket that was part of a Sprint in one Project, but then either move it to another project or clone it, it'll still retain a history of the prior closed sprints it was in. At first, that doesn't seem like a big deal, but it means that the Project it's now part of will have messed up Velocity Charts, because it'll start including the Sprints from the other Project. And there's no obvious way to remove the old Sprints from the ticket (editing the ticket only lets you change the current Sprint assignment, not clear out prior ones.) No good!

Fortunately, the Bulk Edit feature provides a workaround and will let you clear out the old Sprint associations, which will then fix the Velocity Charts. And here's how to do it:
  1. Run a search that'll return the ticket you need to remove the sprints from.
  2. Choose the "Bulk Change" option from the "three-dot menu" in the upper right.
  3. Check only the ticket you want to change. Hit Next button.
  4. Choose "Edit Issues". Hit Next button.
  5. Check the "Change Sprint" option. Leave it blank. Hit Next button.
  6. Review the Confirmation screen. Hit Confirm button.
  7. Hit Acknowledge button when the progress meter is done.

For reference:
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Author Comment

by:Brian Matis
One word of caution: be careful when doing this! Bulk Change is quite powerful and if you're not watching out, you could accidentally change a lot more than what you really want to. I imagine this is why Bulk Change has so many steps to it... Sometimes I'm glad when a task is a bit difficult and cumbersome to do :-)
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You always hear about the feedback sandwich, but I like this 3x3 rule.  One of the most important aspects to being able to improve, is to be able to receive feedback and adjust appropriately.
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This looks like the simplest possible way to track time for projects.
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Author Comment

by:Brandon Lyon
How would one bill for the hours when they're not recording the screen? Not all work is done on computers. Research, client interactions, production meetings, etc often take up just as much time if not more than the actual project work. I don't see screen recording as building an honest relationship, I see it as trusting nobody.
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
How would one bill for the hours when they're not recording the screen? Not all work is done on computers.

No worries, for this type of thing you can enter the hours into the time app. They're just shown as 'offline' type hours.

I don't see screen recording as building an honest relationship, I see it as trusting nobody.

Personally, trust is something that is built over time. Acting as a consultant, I record my screen as a way to ensure that in the event of some sort of miscommunication, there is no doubt as to my intentions or work ethic. I don't expect that every person I hire would have the same openness.

Punch clocks, "security" cameras, screen recorders, etc., can all be viewed from both positive and negative perspectives. At their very core, they are simply record keepers.
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I have always thought when I hear people say meetings are a waste of time or that a meeting did not accomplish something, that really the meeting was poorly ran. I really think that successful meetings do involve team members that know and interact with each other. Interesting to see that Google encourages that interaction during meetings. Sometimes off topic isn't the worst thing. Thoughts???
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Expert Comment

by:Daniella Barion
I agree, when the team members  build  a relationship  ideas and discussions flow easily, interaction is high and work can be more productive.
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Expert Comment

by:Craig Kehler
100% agree that a meeting is only a waste of time if it wasn't thought through before calling it and/or is run poorly. It seems sometimes people think just calling a meeting will solve a problem. They aren't magical.

I also strongly believe that the more you know a person the better you can pick up on their non-verbal communication which is a major part of how we communicate.

I think our lunch time team sports activities are a big boon to our productivity in this way.
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Setting aside dedicated "focus time" for deep tasks that work better without constant interruption?  That's an idea that's starting to sound very appealing... Fast Company has a great article on the subject.

How I Set Aside Two Days Each Week to Work on Just One Thing
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Well this is interesting... Atlassian (makers of JIRA) just purchased Trello. I use JIRA for work and Trello for personal things, so I'm really curious about how this will play out.

https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/09/atlassian-acquires-trello/
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Intriguing article that's pretty relevant for anyone doing Agile development. Team I'm on was just having a discussion related to this earlier today!

Scrum vs. Kanban: How to combine the best of both worlds:
https://techbeacon.com/scrum-vs-kanban-how-combine-best-both-methods
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Project Management

Project management is the discipline of carefully projecting or planning, organizing, motivating and controlling resources to achieve specific goals and meet specific success criteria. A project is a temporary endeavor designed to produce a unique product, service or result with a defined beginning and end (usually time-constrained, and often constrained by funding or deliverables) undertaken to meet unique goals and objectives, typically to bring about beneficial change or added value.