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RansomwareSponsored by Webroot

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Solutions

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Contributors

Ransomware is malicious software, designed to block data access in order to extort money. As a form of malware, ransomware is most often used to infiltrate devices through infected emails or links that, in turn, recognize and take advantage of vulnerabilities in the operating system and installed third-party software.

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Topic Sponsored by Webroot
The Tech or Treat contest winner has been chosen! Congratulations to expert Thomas Zucker-Scharff, our champion, who submitted an article on a suspected hack into his work device that, to this day, has never been solved.
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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
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Free Tool: Subnet Calculator
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Free Tool: Subnet Calculator

The subnet calculator helps you design networks by taking an IP address and network mask and returning information such as network, broadcast address, and host range.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Top 10 Nastiest Ransomware Attacks of 2017

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We’re revealing the top 10 nastiest ransomware attacks from the past year. NotPetya came in on our list as the most destructive ransomware attack of 2017, followed closely by WannaCry and Locky in the number two and three spots, respectively. NotPetya took number one because of its intent to damage a country’s infrastructure. Unlike most ransomware attacks, NotPetya’s code wasn’t designed to extort money from its victims, but to destroy everything in its path.

Check out the entire list here.

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Webroot Protects You Against Bad Rabbit

Webroot customers are protected from the Bad Rabbit malware that is affecting computers across Russia, Ukraine, Bulgaria, a few surrounding Eastern-European countries, as well as Japan.

What we know about Bad Rabbit thus far:

Bad Rabbit is a well-made piece of malware that uses a lot of clever tricks to spread, similar to NotPetya, which affected customers across the globe this summer.

Bad Rabbit has been successful as it has worm-like behavior, using embedded usernames and passwords to move laterally through the network.

Attackers used compromised websites, most of which are news sources local to the APAC/Eastern European region, as watering-hole infection vectors which helps explain the geographic location.

More about Bad Rabbit, what you can do to protect yourself even further, and what one of our Senior Advanced Threat Research Analyst had to say about it here.
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Tech spooks happen to every business owner. Check out my top solutions to these issues and share a story of your own! Simply submit your #TechorTreat article before October ends and be entered to win a  tech gadget.
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Warning: If your device uses WiFi, it's at risk!
News broke today about the Krack Attack, a new cyber threat that can decrypt and potentially view everything users are doing online. The Krack Attack preys on a weakness in WPA2 protocol. Hackers near the vulnerable devices (Android and Linux are at greatest risk) can retrieve sensitive user data and information.
Steps to Protect:
1. Apply patches as they become available. For phones and computers, the patches will come in the usual update format. For wifi routers, the manufacturer's website will have the patches.
2. Don't use public WiFi, especially for sharing or sending any sensitive information.
3. Double check that you are browsing with HTTPS. If you are unsure, install this plug-in to encrypt your communications with major websites and make your browsing more secure. https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere
4. Otherwise, use Ethernet.

For more tips on how to protect yourself: https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/16/heres-what-you-can-do-to-protect-yourself-from-the-krack-wifi-vulnerability/
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Don't Get Hooked!

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Another day, another phishing attack. From businesses to consumers, phishing attacks are becoming a more widespread and dangerous online threat every year. One wrong click could quickly turn into a nightmare if you aren’t aware of the current techniques cyber scammers are using to get access to your valuable personal information.

Stay safe with these tips.

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Cyber News Rundown: Edition 9/29/17

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Showtime Site Found Using Cryptocurrency Miner

Following the discovery last week that ThePirateBay has been using a Monero miner to experiment with revenue alternatives for the site, researchers have found that both Showtime.com and ShowtimeAnytime.com have embedded code for similar cryptocurrency mining. The code itself runs only while the user is on the site, and ceases once they navigate away. The main concern, however, was the high CPU usage users experienced. The script in question was removed after several days of testing, but Showtime has yet to comment on their implementation of the crypto-miner or its intended outcome.

Massive Stash of Credit Card Info Linked to Sonic Breach

In the past few days, researchers have found a trove of credit card data that could be tied to a recent breach at Sonic, the popular drive-in restaurant. The data is organized by the location of each card, and currently contains nearly 5 million unique card numbers and related info. While Sonic has not yet determined the cause of the breach, they have been working with their credit processing company to identify the compromised store locations and implement credit monitoring for affected customers.

More cybersecurity news you might have missed from the week on our blog.
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Expert Comment

by:Nicholas
I was thinking can they really make that much money from it, as I remembered it it was like pennies if even that
Then I read https://www.lifewire.com/cryptocoin-mining-for-beginners-2483064 and it seems there could be big money to be made where popular sites like this are using it. Why invest money when you can get your customers to make you money

But on the flip side if I am giving away a few CPU cycles that meant no ads then is it really a bad thing...
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Thoughts from Webroot’s new President and CEO, Mike Potts

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Mike Potts, Webroot's new President and CEO, shares his thoughts on why he joined Webroot and where he sees the cybersecurity industry going.

I’m delighted to join the Webroot team officially today as CEO. We helped define the cybersecurity field in our first 20 years, but I believe our best days are ahead. With this introductory post, I thought I’d let you know where I intend to focus in my first months at Webroot, with the goal of taking our customers, partners, and company to the next level of success.

More from Mike on our blog about his plans for the future of Webroot.
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Marketo made an announcement in response to the statement recently released by Equifax that identified a vulnerability in Apache Struts as the attack vector for their 2017 breach. Neither Marketo nor ToutApp use the struts programming framework, therefore this issue does not pose a risk to Marketo or ToutApp data.
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Ransomware Spares No One: How to Avoid the Next Big Attack

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With global ransomware attacks, such as WannaCry and not-Petya, making big headlines this year, it seems the unwelcomed scourge of ransomware isn’t going away any time soon. While large-scale attacks like these are most known for their ability to devastate companies and even whole countries, the often under-reported victim is the average home user.

We sat down with Tyler Moffit, senior threat research analyst at Webroot, to talk ransomware in plain terms to help you better understand how to stop modern cybercriminals from hijacking your most valuable data.
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WatchGuard Case Study: Museum of Flight
WatchGuard Case Study: Museum of Flight

“With limited money and limited staffing, we didn’t have a lot of choices in terms of what we could do to bring efficiency. WatchGuard played a central part in changing that.” To provide strong, secure Wi-Fi access within the museum, Hunter chose to deploy WatchGuard’s AP120 APs.

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Cyber News Rundown: Edition 9/15/17

German Voting Software Raises Concerns

With German elections only a couple weeks away, researchers have been working to determine how secure the voting systems really are. Per a recent study, the software being used contains multiple vulnerabilities that could lead to devastating results if the election is compromised. Meanwhile, the software creator maintains there is nothing wrong with the system and any tampering would only lead to confusion, rather than truly affecting the vote’s outcome.

Upgraded Android OS Slows Tide of Overlay Attacks

While overlay attacks are nothing new to Android™ users, the Toast window is a surprisingly fresh take on this technique. Google has already patched the issue being exploited, but many users unintentionally fell victim and gave permissions to a malicious app using the Toast window overlay on a legitimate page to spoof the users input. This type of attack can range from simply installing an annoying piece of malware on the device, all the way up to locking the device down and demanding a ransom.
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Useful guide in recovery from Ransomware attack.
Nice work on the "C" part of the document: Data Integrity: Recovering from Ransomware and Other Destructive Events, Volume C.

This NIST Cybersecurity Practice Guide demonstrates how organizations can develop and implement appropriate actions following a detected cybersecurity event. The solutions outlined in this guide encourage monitoring and detecting data corruption in commodity components—as well as custom applications and data composed of open-source and commercially available components.

https://nccoe.nist.gov/publication/1800-11/index.html
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Cyber News Rundown: 9/1/17

IRS-Themed Ransomware Using Old-School Tactics

Over the past week, researchers have discovered a new ransomware variant that attempts to impersonate both the IRS and the FBI, similar to the FBI lockscreen malware that was popular several years ago. By tricking the victim into opening a link to a fake FBI questionnaire, the ransomware is downloaded onto the machine and begins encrypting. Fortunately, both the FBI and the IRS are taking great measures to alert possible victims and to catalog any scam emails that are being sent out.

History Repeats Itself at UK NHS District

Back in May, the UK’s National Health Services fell victim to a large WannaCry ransomware attack. While most of the districts have since regained full functionality, the district of Lanarkshire has once again been targeted. A cyberattack on its staffing and telephone systems left the district with only emergency services for several days. This event just reinforces the importance of updating security on critical systems before an attack, and even more so after one as devastating as WannaCry.

To read all of the stories, visit the Webroot Threat Blog.
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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
I have always found sad that people use their skills and knowledge to hinder/hurt others. So, I really like that this article is encouraging people to use their skills on an ethical way.
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LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
Just donated all my waiting shirts.
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Catch the latest release in Malwarebyte for Android against Anti Ransomware.

Malwarebytes for Android can be managed from a desktop widget. The app can also be controlled using SMS to remotely lock a device, remediate a device if it is being held ransom, and reset device pin codes.

https://www.helpnetsecurity.com/2017/08/25/infosec-product-august-25/
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
Considering the recent bankbot infestation of the Google Play store, the anti-malware software market for Android is probably about to start booming.
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For everyone who uses a computer, protect yourself from ransomware; do not pay the bounty.  Prevention is the only solution and this author made it very easy for us to learn how.

https://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/30869/Ransomware-Prevention-is-the-Only-Solution.html
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NEW Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 1.5
LVL 1
NEW Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 1.5

With Office 365, it’s your data and your responsibility to protect it. NEW Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 eliminates the risk of losing access to your Office 365 data.

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Your Identity Is Yours. Here’s How To Keep It That Way.

Have you ever been out with friends, had a little too much to drink, and left your credit card in a bar? Or maybe you thought you’d stowed your child’s social security card safely away in your desk drawer, but now you can’t find it. It may seem like losing these items is just an inconvenience, but the reality is that simple slip-ups like these can spell disaster for you and your family.
 
We recently took to the streets of Denver to get a feel for how average Americans are staying safe from identity theft. Their responses were not so surprising.  
 
How are you protecting your identity?
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
How are you protecting your identity?
I'm with you on the credit monitoring and credit freeze. Although, full disclosure, I did spend many years working for one of the major credit bureaus on their consumer credit monitoring products and wrote the business requirements for my team's portion of the credit lock feature—still one of my favorite projects from when I was there. We made it so much easier for customers to manage their freeze status through our service. :-)
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Author Comment

by:Drew Frey
The credit piece is a big one that I think many don't pay enough attention to. It's important to know where you stand and stay up to date with your credit score and in some cases, freeze when needed.

That project sounds really interesting! Fun that you got to work on that Brian!
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Locky ransomware rises from the crypt

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New variants of Locky—Diablo and Lukitus—have surfaced from the ransomware family presumed by many to be dead. After rising to infamy as one of the first major forms of ransomware to achieve global success, Locky’s presence eventually faded. However, it appears this notorious attack is back with distribution through the Necurs botnet, one of the largest botnets in use today.
 
Webroot protects against Diablo and Lukitus
 
For the initial list of MD5s and more detail on Locky.
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Beware - Variant of the well known locky (Diablo6) and mamba (DiskCryptor) are back.

Currently, there is no decryptor available to decrypt data locked by Mamba and Locky as well;
So watch out and educate your users to stay vigilant - old trick in phishing still valid hence detect those red flags to avoid being penetrated. Keep a disciplined cyber hygiene.
 
http://thehackernews.com/2017/08/locky-mamba-ransomware.html
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Webroot Acquires Securecast, Launches Webroot Security Awareness Training

Beta Program Available Immediately to Help Businesses Reduce the Risks and Costs of Cyber Threats with End User Education

Webroot has acquired the assets of Securecast, a security awareness training platform. Building on Securecast, Webroot Security Awareness Training will give managed service providers (MSPs) and businesses a solution to reduce the risks and costs of phishing, ransomware, and other cyber threats with end-user education.

Webroot Security Awareness Training is available today as a beta program, with general availability scheduled for later this fall. The beta will allow participants to operate phishing simulations and provide a test course to address the weakest link in an organization’s security posture: the human factor. By combining the latest threat intelligence, technology, and training, Webroot enables businesses to reduce their security risks by continually educating their users and testing their awareness on cybersecurity best practices.

Explore Webroot Security Awareness Training

Webroot Security Awareness Training Beta Key Facts:
  • Webroot Security Awareness Training is a fully hosted Awareness-as-a-Service platform with an end user training program and a sophisticated phishing simulator.
  • The phishing
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The Future of Cyber Security - Facts & Predictions


Ransomware, one of today's biggest security threats, has become a massive growth opportunity for our channel. As key stakeholders fear now that their organisation will eventually be hit by a ransomware attack, they are willing to spend more on IT security solutions.
 
Join our Live Webinar on 24th August 2017
 
  • Why is NHS spending 50 million pounds to improve its cyber security?
  • Why are schools and top universities the perfect targets for the file-encrypting attacks?
  • How much are businesses willing to invest after their first ransomware attack?
  • How to remain competitive and win the cyber security market?


Register Now and Secure your Spot!
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RansomwareSponsored by Webroot

98

Solutions

246

Contributors

Ransomware is malicious software, designed to block data access in order to extort money. As a form of malware, ransomware is most often used to infiltrate devices through infected emails or links that, in turn, recognize and take advantage of vulnerabilities in the operating system and installed third-party software.