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Software is any set of instructions that directs a computer to perform specific tasks or operations. Computer software consists of programs, libraries and related non-executable data (such as documentation). Computer software is non-tangible, contrasted with computer hardware, which is the physical component of computers. Software written in a machine language is known as "machine code". However, in practice, software is usually written in high-level programming languages than machine language. High-level languages are translated into machine language using a compiler or interpreter or a combination of the two.

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I'm having issues finding how to push Adobe Standard via script. I can push the software out, however, I don't know how to push the key out with the install. Any help would be great. I am deploying it to about 97 PCs. in our organization.
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by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Robert,

What you have done is made a "Post".  To get expert help, you need to "Ask a Question" so that more experts are able to see that you need help. Click the Big blue button near the top of your screen.

Ask-a-Question.png

The following link also explains more about asking for help at Experts Exchange..
http://support.experts-exchange.com/customer/portal/articles/336330

Hope that's helpful.

Regards,
Andrew
EE Topic Advisor
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Learn how to optimize MySQL for your business need
LVL 2
Learn how to optimize MySQL for your business need

With the increasing importance of apps & networks in both business & personal interconnections, perfor. has become one of the key metrics of successful communication. This ebook is a hands-on business-case-driven guide to understanding MySQL query parameter tuning & database perf

Cyber-News-Rundown-WordPress-800x600.jpg
Cyber News Rundown Edition: 7/14/17

Verizon Call Logs Found Exposed Online

Over the past month, researchers have been learning more about the recent discovery of unsecured customer service call records for over 14 million individuals on an Amazon server. The server in question is controlled by Nice Systems, an enterprise software company based in Israel, and contained call logs from January through June of this year. In the unencrypted records were customers’ names and their Verizon account login credentials. Even after Verizon became aware of the server’s vulnerability, it took over a week to get it properly secured by Nice Systems.

Bupa Healthcare Services Breached

In the last week, international healthcare provider Bupa was the victim of a data breach that included basic customer information, such as names, birthdates, and nationalities. The breach originated with an employee incorrectly transferring data between systems of Bupa Global, which handles international health insurance for frequent travelers—around 108,000 customers in total. The affected branch of Bupa has contacted all affected customers, and has stated that no other branches worldwide have been compromised.

Botnets Distributing New Point-of-Sale Malware

With the recent influx of botnet-related cyberattacks in the last year, it’s hardly surprising that Point-of-Sale malware is now spreading through the same channels
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Is there any free offline software for Recruitment managemant database ???
I need inputs like candidate name,CTC,contact number,email,resume upload etc.,
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LVL 66

Expert Comment

by:Jim Horn
None that I'm aware of, but I imagine that this wouldn't be too different from any basic CRM, so if you search for free CRM's you may find some.  Also I'm sure SalesForce.com has some recruiting-specific offerings.

Microsoft Access has some canned database wizards, maybe one of them is a CRM.

Next time please ask this as a question and not in a post.  Thanks in advance.
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Anyone else find it amusingly ironic that the spell check software in my browser doesn't recognize the word driverless?

driverless.PNG
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Expert Comment

by:Craig Kehler
I'm a weird hybrid, probably due to author's I read and working internationally. Not worth any real concerted effort though with Typoglycemia and all. :)
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Expert Comment

by:Jim Horn
Maybe there's some kind of 'MBA Buzzword Bingo' dictionary file that needs to be loaded.
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Curious where technology will take us in five years? This IBM infographic forecasts the top five innovations that may change the way live and interact with the world.

https://futurism.com/images/life-in-2022/
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Expert Comment

by:Pierre Ammoun
Where can I find basic guidelines to "educate the users" on being careful about malware ransomware ?
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Author Comment

by:Alix Postan
Hi Pierre! That's a great question! Here are some links to some articles that I think would help educate users about being careful about malware:

1) 7 Things About Information Security Your Boss Wants to Know: http://www.uzado.com/blog/7-things-about-information-security-your-boss-wants-to-know

2) 7 Tips for Dealing with Internet Security Threats: http://www.uzado.com/blog/7-tips-for-dealing-with-internet-security-threats

3) 5 Best Security Blogs You Should be Reading: http://www.uzado.com/blog/five-best-security-blogs-you-should-be-reading

Hope that helps! Let me know if you need more articles!
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"Prohibits the DOD from using software platforms developed by Kaspersky Lab due to
reports that the Moscow-based company might be vulnerable to Russian government
influence."

https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/FY18%20NDAA%20summary2.pdf

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/government/senate-gets-ready-to-ban-kaspersky-products-as-fbi-interviews-companys-us-employees/

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Petrwrap, specifically, targets the Master File Table (MFT), which is essential for your computer to find files on the computer. By targeting the MFT, the ransomware is able to attack individual files faster than if each file were to be encrypted one-by-one. The good news is… that Petrwrap is detectable by anti-virus tools. Unfortunately, if the anti-virus scanner is delayed in catching it, Petrwrap can easily get a foothold into the computer system and spreads very quickly. Moreover, the encryption is so strong, that it is unlikely to be able to break through the software and recover files.
Check out our blog post on “Why Vulnerability Assessments Are Insufficient” for more information on securing your servers.


http://www.uzado.com/blog/why-vulnerability-assessments-are-insufficient
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Like most people, I hate spam! - Which is why I love Mailwasher Pro!  I highly recommend it and no, that's not my affiliate link. Though I do have one :)

I've yet to try another anti-spam solution that gives me as much control over my mail and that works as well as this software does in keeping spam out of my Inbox, while never affecting the mail I want to keep.

Here's an example screen grab I just took to show why I'm so fond of it.

Mailwasher Pro Partial Screen Grab
Every action in this screen shot was pre-marked automatically for me without my needing to do a thing. I have the option to over-ride anything with a quick mouse click and the program will remember my preferences for the next time it checks.  I can also safely preview any email in that list using plain Text or HTML format and even shoot off a quick Reply or Forward if I want to, without needing to bring it into Outlook.

When I want to bring in my email, I just hit the big "Wash Mail" button and it deletes all the garbage from my mail server's host, opens (or maximizes) Outlook and I click send/receive in there to bring in only the good stuff that I want to keep.  Spam hasn't made its way into my Outlook for years now.  I also have it installed on both my IPhone and IPad.

When I do want to adjust my additional "self created" filters, the provided filter creation tool is great so the process only takes seconds to do.  If you hate spam as much as I …
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Yep.. That's a risk with many web based (or even managed) solutions.  You're always at the mercy of whoever runs the service.

I'm a bit of a control freak at heart, so Mailwasher suits me down to the ground.  Having used it for so long, it's learning history rarely (if ever) gets it wrong for me these days.

Thanks for sharing your experience!
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Would you purchase Sony's Koov for your child? It's definitely a cool concept and I love the look of the "pixel" blocks, but the high price point is definitely a deterrent with more affordable competing products available. 

https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/20/sony-soft-launches-an-educational-robotics-coding-kit-on-indiegogo/
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Expert Comment

by:Daniella Barion
Sometimes in the Internet World, the recognized brands charge a lot to show how "Great" are their products.  This is the space for startups to have a chance.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
I love seeing these kind of products; this stuff is so cool! I've really been wanting to get something like this for myself, but I'm more inclined towards going with Lego's Mindstorms since they've been around so long and been through many revisions. Plus, they're Lego; can't go wrong with Lego!
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Database Solutions Engineer FAQs
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Database Solutions Engineer FAQs

In this series, we will discuss common questions received as a database Solutions Engineer at Percona. In this role, we speak with a wide array of MySQL and MongoDB users responsible for both extremely large and complex environments to smaller single-server environments.

A recent post by Brian Matis motivated me to make this alternate post to see what sort of reaction others might have about these recent revelations.

A recent article on The Verge claims that "The older operating system was less vulnerable that anyone expected"

Windows XP computers were mostly immune to WannaCry

Another article from the same source claims "Windows XP was ‘insignificant,’ researchers say" with regards to helping the WannaCry outbreak spread.

"Almost all WannaCry victims were running Windows 7"

Lots of folks (from their perspective) with a genuine need to keep running on Windows XP suffered a lot of grief in Tech forums as being one of the root causes of giving WannaCry a platform to spread and thrive from, yet now it appears all the criticism may have been a little premature and unjustified.

For the record, I personally don't condone anyone using unsupported operating systems and actively encourage everyone I deal with to get themselves up to date, but I am also sympathetic to those who feel they have a genuine need to do that, so also think they shouldn't be …
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Expert Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
We have too many XP computers at my institution (some with only SP2) - mostly due to budgets and instrumentation.
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Thomas,
Have you considered purchasing an XP Updates agreement with Microsoft? Might be an easier solution if budget restraints prevent you from upgrading? I wouldn't feel comfortable with a lot of XP machines in an environment as it would be a case of when, not if, it will come back to bite you.  Patches are available, just at a cost.

Incidentally, SP3 for XP is still provided by Microsoft - why not install it?

Steps to take before you install Windows XP Service Pack 3

How to obtain Windows XP Service Pack 3 (SP3)

Cheers..
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Once again, security threats are prompting Microsoft to provide patches for Windows XP, which theoretically isn't supposed to be supported by them anymore. While it sucks to have to support old systems like this, it's a good call on their part. Security weaknesses in one version of Windows can weaken the entire ecosystem by allowing the spread of malicious software.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/6/13/15790030/microsoft-windows-xp-vista-security-updates-june-2017
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Just read that article and was interested to read this.. "Windows XP computers were mostly immune to WannaCry"

Not that I'm condoning folks should continue to run XP of course, but I found this very interesting "Almost all WannaCry victims were running Windows 7"

Just goes to show how slack a lot of people are with regards to downloading their updates I guess.
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
although we have plenty of clients, that had missing updates since Feb 2017, and they were not caught out!

because FIREWALLs and GROUP POLICIES, and restricted Applications!

The layered approach!
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June’s Course of the Month has been released! Enroll in our community security expert, Thomas Zucker-Scharff's, ransomware prevention and preparation course free of charge. Learn more about the course.
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As if I needed another reason to get excited for the Olympics--take a peek at Toyota's flying "car" that is planned to deliver the Olympic torch in 2020. It's a bumpy ride in the video, but its only a matter of time before our current modes of transportation are obsolete.

https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/04/toyotas-flying-car-project-takes-a-tentative-test-flight/
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Expert Comment

by:Daniella Barion
I am glad they have enough time to practice.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Well, we might feel less good about all that practice time if Skynet ever comes online and takes over ;-)
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When a tech company stops servicing a particular program, software, or piece of hardware, consumers still using the outdated equipment are usually left to fend off security measures, bugs, and other problems that come their way on their own.
 
During the WannaCry ransomware attack a few weeks ago, we saw an unprecedented action from Microsoft, as they stepped up to provide a patch for Microsoft XP, Windows 8, and Windows Server 2003. Microsoft XP is a program they have not supported since 2014.
 
This action to secure vulnerable devices and avoid the encryption of personal, patient, and corporate data showed the tech community that corporations care about more than the bottom line.
 
Learn more about Microsoft’s special patch release and how the tech community has responded.
 
How were you affected by WannaCry? We’d love to hear from you—share your experience online now.
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
Uber is really coming out with great ways to leverage their technology. Next thing you know, we'll see them getting into air and water transport...
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A new malware called "Adylkuzz"  was recently discovered and leverages the same hole in old Windows software used to spread WannaCry.

"The interesting thing about the Adylkuzz malware, Huss said, is that it prevented other viruses from infecting the computer it's on because it wanted to remain undetectable for as long as possible -- that means it prevented WannaCry from ransoming those computers."

http://money.cnn.com/2017/05/18/technology/windows-adylkuzz-cryptocurrency/index.html
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Wow... viruses fighting other viruses...
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LVL 96

Expert Comment

by:Experienced Member
A new malware ...  leverages the same hole in old Windows software

So stop the excuses, dump everything earlier than Windows 7 and Server 2008, and patch the rest. That works.

Then put in good spam filters.

People are tied to their old systems and then they wonder what happened.
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Using 2003 or XP?  Something older?  I have little sympathy for you.  Things get old.  Software is constantly evolving and those creating it utilize new features and capabilities that (in theory) bring you more capabilities and ease of use.  It's impossible for any software developer to support everything they've ever created indefinitely.  Their abilities to continue innovating would grind to a halt.  Even for the largest of companies, like Microsoft.  They MUST cut off support at some point.  Microsoft has, it would seem, set this standard to 10 years.  Given how long that is and the advancements that can be done in 10 years, in my opinion, that is reasonable.  XP and Server 2003 are now 14+ years old.  WELL BEYOND their support life.  

Now I'm confident Microsoft doesn't actively seek to "break" their newer products ability to connect to the older, now unsupported ones, but I would say it's reasonable to EXPECT they no longer test and see if a Windows 10 computer can connect to a 2003 domain.  They MAY, at points, decide to remove functionality from 10 but I'm confident they do so to improve security.  And if that aspect that is removed happens to be the "main" way something was done in an older version that is no longer supported? Well, they warned you!

Ten years is a reasonable time frame.  If you're using what is now antiquated technology, I have little sympathy.

"Fine Lee, but what about me - I use a program that controls a device that requires it run on …
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Expert Comment

by:Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)
I suppose in the end that what it boils down to is whether you consider safety a function of software or not.  I would say not.  

 But if you do, the problem is in measuring how safe it is and I don't think you ever can.   You can throw a battery of tests at it, but what's safe today may not be safe tomorrow.

 On the flip side, upgrading is no guarantee of being safe either.   To use your car analogy, if my new vehicle uses a Takata air big, then I'm not very safe am I despite that I now have an air bag.  

 So do I use "safety" as a measure in the decision to upgrade or not?   I don't see how you can.

 One could even make the argument in general that by upgrading into a situation with more complexity then what I currently have, I will probably be less safe than I am now (more complexity = more potential holes).    So in regards to safety, not upgrading may be a better choice.    Sometimes, the Devil you know is better than the one you don't.  

 To wrap this up,  I don't think there are any simple answers here of course, but I don't hold it against people for not wanting to upgrade.  I also don't think software vendors should sunset support for products they release.    If someone calls me on something I wrote 15 years ago, I'm not going to say "sorry, can't support that" just because it's old and they decided to keep it.
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Author Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
Funny, as I was formulating my response to you yesterday, I was going to include a reference to the Takata airbag thing - any time you add new capabilities, you get more complicated and though overall safety can improve, it can also, in some circumstances, become less safe.  I believe there is a net benefit (both with airbags and with new software's increasing complexity).

I guess it depends on how you value things.  To me, safety (security) is extremely important.  And I think most people should feel that way.  As such, people need to take responsibility for their continued existence and accept how technology generally (and technology companies) generally work and the economics attached to it.
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[Webinar] How Hackers Steal Your Credentials
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[Webinar] How Hackers Steal Your Credentials

Do You Know How Hackers Steal Your Credentials? Join us and Skyport Systems to learn how hackers steal your credentials and why Active Directory must be secure to stop them. Thursday, July 13, 2017 10:00 A.M. PDT

Thought for the day: if you have an autonomous car and get pulled over for speeding, who pays the ticket? You or the car manufacturer?
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Expert Comment

by:Dustin Saunders
@brian - That's an interesting question, I would assume that the cars actively can process a speed limit sign and then that data gets relayed back to Google after x number of verifications and the database gets changed permanently.

There are some other interesting problems to, come to think of it- for example, I wonder how the car would react to something like a construction worker either waving you on to move forward or holding up his hand to stop you.  

For a lot of things, there's going to need to be manual interaction- and I think the variable of liability will be in who the car's black box says was in control at the time.
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Justin Pierce
@Brian

Maybe car companies will work with the state to help pay for electronic signs that interact with their cars. The German automakers did this for the autobahn, making it a super safe place to drive. I was astonished when my rental car automatically pulled the speed limit from the passing signs, and put it on my HUD.
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"This is called a book, it installs new software in your brain operating system!"
By Tico Santa Cruz, Brazilian Composer, writer, and poet.IMG_0135.JPG
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
Is there any sort of repair tool? Afraid I've installed too much Hunter S Thompson...
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Ha! Every time I read a book, I think of the movie The Matrix and how they get new skills uploaded directly into their brains. "I know kung-fu!"
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New freeware from CodeTwo to automate bulk upload of user photos to Office 365


Hi there,

We (CodeTwo) have released a new free tool for bulk Office 365 user photo management - CodeTwo User Photos for Office 365. This application is a twin program of our other well-known freeware for user photo management CodeTwo Active Directory Photos, but it operates in Office 365.

CodeTwo User Photos for Office 365 will handle everything from photo preparation, through auto matching, to straightforward bulk upload of users’ photos to Exchange Online mailboxes. No need to use PowerShell and the Set-UserPhoto cmdlet – the entire process is easily handled via an intuitive GUI.

Here you can watch how the program works:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6eLrwLVY3o&t=1s?sts=6789

You can also find more details on program’s official website or this blog post.

Enjoy!
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Expert Comment

by:Craig Kehler
And Michael if you factor in lawyers fee's and prison time, no. One can also hope for a lack of malice and some common decency.
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Expert Comment

by:Michael Arciniega
Craig, that's if they get caught though and even they do, enough resources/wealth can potentially get you out of it (ie bankers in the 2008 market crash). Here is a notable example in the cryptocurrency space that underwent a professional third party code review and had a bug bounty program.

I wish more people had common decency and lacked malice but millions of dollars can be very trying on people's moral fortitude.
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Software-Other

37K

Solutions

38K

Contributors

Software is any set of instructions that directs a computer to perform specific tasks or operations. Computer software consists of programs, libraries and related non-executable data (such as documentation). Computer software is non-tangible, contrasted with computer hardware, which is the physical component of computers. Software written in a machine language is known as "machine code". However, in practice, software is usually written in high-level programming languages than machine language. High-level languages are translated into machine language using a compiler or interpreter or a combination of the two.