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SQL

SQL (Structured Query Language) is designed to be used in conjunction with relational database products as of a means of working with sets of data. SQL consists of data definition, data manipulation, and procedural elements. Its scope includes data insert, query, update and delete, schema creation and modification, and data access control.

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Synchronize List Box in Access using SQL and VBA
With just a little bit of  SQL and VBA, many doors open to cool things like synchronize a list box to display data relevant to other information on a form.  If you have never written code or looked at an SQL statement before, no problem! ...  give it a chance. Unleash a great new potential.

This technique of basing the Row Source of one control on the value in another is called "cascading", and you will probably hear that term more in reference to combo boxes.

A list box has many similarities to a combo box such as Row Source, Column Count, Column Widths, and Column Heads. The Width of a list in a combo box is List Width; in a list box, it is the same as the control Width.

As the customer changes, VBA runs to add criteria to the SQL statement for the list box. SQL is what a query stores to know what data to get, where it comes from, and how to sort.  SQL is Structured Query Language.  Don't let the acronym intimidate you.  

An SQL statement is simply a standardized way to get information from database tables. It specifies what to show (Select), and where data comes from (From). Optional clauses include criteria (Where), and how to sort (Order By).  The basic syntax for an SQL statement is:
SELECT fieldlist
FROM tablename
WHERE criteria
ORDER BY fieldlist;

To get an SQL statement into the Row Source of a combo box or list box, you can: (1) Make a query to show what you want, switch to SQL view, and copy the SQL statement, or (2) click in a control's Row …
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Evaluating UTMs? Here's what you need to know!
Evaluating UTMs? Here's what you need to know!

Evaluating a UTM appliance and vendor can prove to be an overwhelming exercise.  How can you make sure that you're getting the security that your organization needs without breaking the bank? Check out our UTM Buyer's Guide for more information on what you should be looking for!

Subform to show Calculations in Microsoft Access
Look below the covers at a subform control , and the form that is inside it. Explore properties and see how easy it is to aggregate, get statistics, and synchronize results for your data.

A Microsoft Access subform is used to show relevant calculations for data in the mainform.

A subform control is a container, like a bucket, for a form or report. Its properties specify: what it contains (Source Object), how it is linked (Link Master Fields, Link Child Fields), what it is called (Name), how big it is (Width, Height), where it is  (Top, Left), what it looks like (Border Color, Border Style, Special Effect), whether or not it shows (Visible), if the user can modify values (Locked, Enabled), and so on.

As you navigate from record to record in the mainform, data in the subform automatically changes. LinkMasterFields and LinkChildFields are used to synchronize the forms, without any more effort on your part!

On the mainform, LinkMasterFields is a combobox that stores CustomerID but shows the customer name and more. What is displayed in the combobox is influenced by Column Count, ColumnWidths, and ListWidth.

The form inside the subform control is a regular form designed to be used as a subform; and in this case, to display information only, so things like RecordSelectors and ScrollBars are turned off. The RecordSource for the subform (where it gets its data from) is a query that has 2 queries below it doing more calculations. See how queries are stacked to get …
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SQL

SQL (Structured Query Language) is designed to be used in conjunction with relational database products as of a means of working with sets of data. SQL consists of data definition, data manipulation, and procedural elements. Its scope includes data insert, query, update and delete, schema creation and modification, and data access control.