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Computer data storage, often called storage or memory, is a technology consisting of computer components and recording media used to retain digital data. In addition to local storage devices like CD and DVD readers, hard drives and flash drives, solid state drives can hold enormous amounts of data in a very small device. Cloud services and other new forms of remote storage also add to the capacity of devices and their ability to access more data without building additional data storage into a device.

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[Webinar] Why Does Multicloud Storage Matter?
Despite its rising prevalence in the business world, "the cloud" is still misunderstood. Some companies still believe common misconceptions about lack of security in cloud solutions and many misuses of cloud storage options still occur every day.

Nimble Storage wants to help companies and IT personnel better understand how to avoid these misuses, while showing how to make the most of the cloud experience. The best way to start? By embracing multicloud storage options.

Watch this video to learn why multicloud solutions matter to the foundation of your cloud storage strategy.
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NEW Veeam Agent for Microsoft Windows
LVL 1
NEW Veeam Agent for Microsoft Windows

Backup and recover physical and cloud-based servers and workstations, as well as endpoint devices that belong to remote users. Avoid downtime and data loss quickly and easily for Windows-based physical or public cloud-based workloads!

Reformatting Your Flash Drive
This Micro Tutorial will teach you how to reformat your flash drive. Sometimes your flash drive may have issues carrying files so this will completely restore it to manufacturing settings. Make sure to backup all files before reformatting.

This will be demonstrated using 3.0 Flash Drive on Windows 8 operating system.
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Windows Server 2012 – Configuring as an iSCSI Target
This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of installing the necessary services and then configuring a Windows Server 2012 system as an iSCSI target.

1. To install the necessary roles, go to Server Manager, and select Add Roles and Features either from the home screen or click Manage and select the option

2. Click Next, accepting all defaults until the Server Roles selection pane is displayed. Expand File and Storage Service, then File and iSCSI Services. Place a check in the box by iSCSI Target Server. Click Next.

3. Click Next through the Features screen and review the summary report. Then click Install.

4. Once installed, launch Server Manager. From the dashboard, select File and Storage on the left panel.

5. Click on iSCSI, and select To Create an iSCSI virtual disk, start the New iSCSI Virtual Disk Wizard in the middle of the screen

6. Select the desired volume then, click Next

7. Provide a name for the disk and a description if desired, click Next

8. Select a size for the disk, then decide whether it will be either a fixed size or dynamically adjusting, click Next

9. Select the option to create a new target, click Next

10. Provide a name for the target and a description if desired, click Next

11. Select Add to add those servers with access rights to this target. You can either select from existing initiators or browse to locate and query any new ones. Click OK, click Next.

12. If authentication is desired, enter the CHAP information, otherwise click Next

13. Review the summary screen. If all of the information is correct, then click Create

14. Once created, the disk should begin initializing. This should be visible on the iSCSI Virtual Disk screen

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Password Protecting an External Drive
This video teaches viewers how to encrypt an external drive that requires a password to read and edit the drive. All tasks are done in Disk Utility.

1. Plug in the external drive you wish to encrypt

2. Make sure all previous data on the drive has been saved else where. Formatting the drive will erase all data on the drive.

3. Open up Disk Utility. You can find this by clicking on the magnifying glass in the upper right hand corner and search for "Disk Utility". You may also open through System Preferences.

4. In the left hand panel select the External Drive you wish to encrypt

5. For Format select "Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted)

6. Name the drive

7. If you want to prevent the recovery of the disk's erased data, configure its Security Options

8. Click Erase

9. Type in a Password and Password Hint (optional)

10. Wait for Drive to finish formatting. Eject and test. The Drive should prompt a password before opening.

11. If the drive is unable to encrypt, this is likely due to some previous encryption that isn't allowing Disk Utililty to reformat the drive. This will require some more work in Terminal.

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Cloning a Hard Drive with Casper
This video Micro Tutorial explains how to clone a hard drive using a commercial software product for Windows systems called Casper from Future Systems Solutions (FSS). Cloning makes an exact, complete copy of one hard disk drive (HDD) onto another drive, thereby providing an excellent backup function, as well as the ability to upgrade drives, such as going to a higher capacity drive and/or from an HDD to a solid state drive (SSD) or solid state hybrid drive (SSHD).

1. Download the Trial Edition


Visit the Casper website at:

https://www.fssdev.com/products/casper/trial/

Click one of the download links:

download links

2. Install casper_se_trial_setup.exe

After downloading, run the installer. FSS offers a free 30-day trial, but keep in mind that the trial edition does not have the volume resizing feature. The licensed product does have it, meaning Casper can clone to the same size drive or to a larger one or even to a smaller one, as long as there is enough space on the smaller one to house the used (non-free) space from the larger one. The licensed product is not free, but is reasonably priced, in my opinion:

http://www.fssdev.com/shop/

3. Run Casper and click on the Copy Drive icon

This performs the cloning operation.
copy drive

4. Select the drive you want to copy

Casper will display a list of all drives on the system:
source drivesSelect the source drive, that is, the one you want to clone, and click the Next button.

5. Select the destination drive

Casper will display a list of the drives on the system that are capable of housing the clone:
destination driveSelect the destination drive, that is, the one you want to receive the clone, and click the Next button.

6. Confirm the overwrite warning

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LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:Abraham Deutsch
Its the standard (non-server) edition
When a restore is need I would like to get back the entire computer, even if for performance purposes I would split the OS (SSD) and files on two disks but for backup, I would expect that one disk (SATA) should be enough. especially when recommended to have to copy's of each backup. Just my opinion.
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LVL 56

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Abraham,
If I'm understanding it right, you want to backup two separate disks (one with the OS, one with data) onto a single backup disk that can house multiple backups (you said, "to copy's of each backup", by which I assume you meant "two copies of each backup"). You can't do that with cloning, which, by its very nature, makes an exact copy of one disk (all partitions/volumes) onto another disk. For your requirement, I recommend imaging, not cloning. Run a job that makes an image for the OS disk and run another job that makes an image for the data disk. Store all of the images on your single backup disk, which, as you said, should be large enough to house multiple images. I have a client who does this on an 8TB NAS (4TB available — it is mirrored). Works very well! Regards, Joe
0

Storage

41K

Solutions

35K

Contributors

Computer data storage, often called storage or memory, is a technology consisting of computer components and recording media used to retain digital data. In addition to local storage devices like CD and DVD readers, hard drives and flash drives, solid state drives can hold enormous amounts of data in a very small device. Cloud services and other new forms of remote storage also add to the capacity of devices and their ability to access more data without building additional data storage into a device.