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Tech Policy

A rule or regulation put into place by governing bodies on technology practices, access of user devices, patents and intellectual property, provider regulations, and much more.

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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
I already did!
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Stack Overflow Podcast - Developer Story
Stack Overflow Podcast - Developer Story

Welcome to the Stack Overflow podcast recorded Thursday July 20 at Stack Overflow Headquearters in NYC. Your hosts today are podcast regulars Jay Hanlon, David Fullerton, and Ilana Yitzhaki, plus the quite irregular Matt Sherman (Stack Overflow Engineering Manager extraordinaire)

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Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
If it walks like a dictatorship and talks like a dictatorship, its probably a dictatorship.  I've read perspectives of Russians saying their elections are a joke...merely for the sake of appearances.  On the other side, many Russians love Putin.  Trump and Ajit Pai are trying to repeal Title 2 so ISPs can monopolize one of the last things US citizens still have their own control over.  I guess the only difference between Russia and here (USA) is when a member of the administration in Russia is let go its not treated like The Apprentice: White House edition. xD
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FCCInfographic-SocialMedia-Sina-OS.pngThe results of the net neutrality Day of Action are in! Thank you to everyone in our tech community who participated by sending comments to the FCC, emails to Congress, and called Congress. Check out the days total results reported in our article update.
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There's been a lot of discussion lately about Net Neutrality and the various pros/cons. While I'm loath to have unnecessary legislation or "solutions in search of a problem" and greatly respect those viewpoints of the debate, I've ultimately fallen on the side in favor of Net Neutrality. Nilay Patel over at The Verge pulls no punches in his eloquent article that highlights so many of the reasons that have shaped my view on the issue.

It's a long read, but well worth it. This sort of thing impacts all of us in IT and no matter what happens or what opinions you hold on the matter, I'm hopeful we can all find common ground in keeping the internet great.
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Administrative Comment

by:Mister Preston
I called Salud too!  It only took my 5 minutes.
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Expert Comment

by:Shilpa Malhotra
I really Appreciate !!

Shilpa Malhotra
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Loading-bar.pngToday, users from all websites and online communities are coming together to sound the alarm on the FCC's attack on net neutrality. Cable companies want to get rid of net neutrality. Without it, sites like ours could be censored, slowed down, or forced to charge extra fees. Stand with Experts Exchange today and support Title II and all users' rights to free and fast internet by contacting Congress and the FCC today!
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by:ElrondCT
I mentioned blocking web sites because that's what EE focused on. But where is any evidence that "Without it, sites like ours could be censored, slowed down, or forced to charge extra fees"? NONE. Is something like that theoretically possible? Yes. Is there any realistic likelihood of it happening, and not being immediately rolled back by customer protest? No. EE and other net-neut advocates are conjuring bogeymen. And complaining about hidden charges is confusing the issue--that's not a net-neut matter, but ordinary customer protection that other laws cover.

A couple of years ago, Consumer Reports magazine put out a sob story about some small business down South that depended on the Internet for its business and was afraid that without net-neut, they could be blocked and lose their customers. Anyone who really thinks ISPs are spending their time looking for small businesses to destroy is delusional. That business is far more at risk from Google changing its ad policies. I'm personally dealing with such an issue right now; Google has decided that advertising free software is a security risk, and even though I've provided certification that the free software is trial software for our own application, there are no hitchhiking apps, and we've been using Google for nearly 10 years, they've suspended my site from all Google advertising, severely limiting my ability to reach new customers. Net-neut doesn't help me in the slightest on this. Google scares me more than Comcast.
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
But where is any evidence that  "Without it, sites like ours could be censored, slowed down, or forced to charge extra fees"? NONE. Is something like that theoretically possible? Yes. Is there any realistic likelihood of it happening, and not being immediately rolled back by customer protest? No.

Above I linked to examples of broadband providers intentionally blocking their customers from using certain connections (while denying it), throttling them (in deceptive ways), deceptively billing them and favoring their own content services over other 3rd parties'.

Their own customers. People who generally have no other Internet option and even if they did wouldn't swallow ~$150 ETF, new equipment/activation fees, and a phone call with a retention specialist, in protest.

And you think they're unlikely to do the same thing to edge providers? They already are. Those fees will be passed on to the customer (you & I) and if the edge provider doesn't pay-to-play, then I guess we'll just sit here and watch the *buffering* that we paid our hard earned money to see.
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Here's the TL;DR version.
"Net neutrality is a longstanding digital principle that internet service providers should treat all web traffic equally and fairly. This means providers cannot prefer one website or service over the other by granting unequal loading speeds or by blocking or slowing content."
Basically, this gives an internet service provider (ISP) the ability to purposefully slow down Netflix or Facebook if it wants to. "Netflix won’t disclose its Day of Action plans but says it will be “noticeable” for its users."
Sounds like they might be inclined to give its audience a taste of what this could be like?

Experts Exchange is on the list with Google, Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and so many more.
https://www.battleforthenet.com/july12/?_fp=f_f5f283
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Expert Comment

by:Sean Plemons Kelly, CISSP
It's great to see EE on that list of names.
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by:Akhil Vinay Mandava
keep going guys no one can stop us.
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Let's take a look back at the commercialization of the internet to understand why keeping it open and neutral is in our best interest as a society.
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saveNetNeutrality_NativeAd.pngThe internet-wide Day of Action for all user's rights to net neutrality is July 12th! Take a stand by signing the petition here or leaving a comment with the FCC here on why you support Title II. (Click the "+Express" link to leave your comment.)
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Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services
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Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

netNeutralityArticleNativeAd.pngCheck out our new article about our stance on a user's right to net neutrality and why it's an important issue. Join us in this initiative by signing the petition and leaving a comment with the FCC on why you support Title II. (Click the "+Express" link to leave your comment.)
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I watched the Free "GDPR Attack Plan: What You Need To Know" course created by Troy Hunt the other day.  It was quite interesting.

If you're in an organisation who stores personal data of EU citizens/users then you will want to be aware of what GDPR is.  There are some regulation changes coming up in 2018 that will probably affect your business.  I've placed a link below to the free course.

https://info.varonis.com/gdpr-attack-plan
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Author Comment

by:Doug Walton
I haven't seen a full list, but here are some: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality#Arguments_against

Opponents of net neutrality regulations include economists, Internet providers and technologists. Among corporations, opponents include AT&T, Verizon, IBM, Intel, Cisco, Nokia, Qualcomm, Broadcom, Juniper, D-Link, Wintel, Alcatel-Lucent, Corning, Panasonic, Ericsson, and others.[82][160][161] Notable technologists who oppose net neutrality include Marc Andreessen, Scott McNealy, Peter Thiel, David Farber, Nicholas Negroponte, Rajeev Suri, Jeff Pulver, John Perry Barlow, and Bob Kahn.
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
Some of those names were actually slightly surprising. Last night I dug up another article showcasing some of the anti-net neutrality companies and how much they invested in lobbying:
https://www.dailydot.com/layer8/lobbyists-net-neutrality-fcc/
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Learn why we support net neutrality and why the topic is important to all internet users.
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Expert Comment

by:David
Comment Utility
How it *should* be is that both you and your ISP have the option to make that decision in the first place.  An ISP is in business to make money, and if there is a market for a sustained throughput product,  you can bet your life they will offer it, and then customers will be free to decide if they want such a thing.  

Surely you don't have a problem allowing people to purchase internet packages of different bandwidths.   Yet you are arguing for a one-size-fits all package where you VOIP traffic or streaming video site has dropped packets and choppy sound because somebody using the same ISP is spamming mailboxes and spam traffic is treated exactly the same.

You can't have it both ways.   You can't make an argument against allowing people to buy a package from an ISP for bandwidth for one protocol without saying you're against allowing ISPs to offer more than one speed for all protocols.   It is hypocritical to say people shouldn't be allowed to buy faster internet speeds for a specific protocol ... unless you also say that providers should only offer one speed for everything, regardless of what their needs are.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Comment Utility
Thanks for the response, David! It's nice hearing the counterpoint. Something that's been very tricky about this issue is how there is certainly some potential for good improvements that could come of more technical freedom for the infrastructure. I could see allowing some sort of prioritization for "emergency" traffic, much like we do for fire trucks and ambulances on roadways, for example... But if left up to an ISP, what would be termed "emergency" traffic? The highest bidder?

If the ISP starts saying that some traffic types are more important than others (i.e. VOIP more important than mass emails) then won't some people start thinking that their email is more important than when I'm trying to play World of Warcraft (a claim I'll disagree with ;-)

I think the key dividing line may be in how much someone trusts the big carriers to use their powers for good. And personally, I really don't. Perhaps it's because the one truly terrible customer service experience I've ever encountered, the one time I got seriously angry, was with my cable company...

Another point: In your example, you mention VOIP service being impacted by spam. But ultimately, why would I not get my throughput? Is the argument for eliminating net neutrality in order to bring about speed improvements really just a way to try to avoid overall bandwidth improvements?
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Google just got a hefty fine from the European Antitrust Monitor: $2.72 biiiillion (€2.42 billion)
Drevil_million_dollars.jpg
I've never relied on Google's shopping results as I'm an Amazon fan, but apparently they tanked their competitor's traffic in the EU.

Of course, they plan on appealing but I wonder what this means for their strategy moving forward.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/27/534524024/google-hit-with-2-7-billion-fine-by-european-antitrust-monitor
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Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Wow.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Very reminiscent of the Microsoft antitrust case back in 2001 re: Internet Explorer.
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Participating in the Internet-wide Day of Action to support Title II? We'd love to hear your opinion on net neutrality. Tell us in the comments below by 7 p.m. PST (today) and be included in a community response infographic.
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Join Experts Exchange in our support of a user's right to net neutrality. Below is our official company statement on this issue. We hope you will join this cause with us.

"Experts Exchange believes in a user's right to net neutrality. On July 12th, an internet-wide Day of Action, we will stand alongside those who support Title II, the legal framework protecting our online freedom."
Follow this link and click "+Express" to leave a comment with the FCC on why you support Title II.
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Expert Comment

by:Christopher Rourke
On July 12, "Hold your ground!" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6t4xMgrpjBs
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The Federal Communications Commission voted 2-1 today to start the process of eliminating net neutrality rules and the classification of home and mobile Internet service providers as common carriers under Title II of the Communications Act.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/05/net-neutrality-goes-down-in-flames-as-fcc-votes-to-kill-title-ii-rules/
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
net neutrality office space
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Survive A High-Traffic Event with Percona
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Survive A High-Traffic Event with Percona

Your application or website rely on your database to deliver information about products and services to your customers. You can’t afford to have your database lose performance, lose availability or become unresponsive – even for just a few minutes.

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Expert Comment

by:Daniella Barion
Information is one of the greatest treasures and has a different value for individuals, companies or government so it becomes strategic to preserve this security. Unfortunately, the vulnerability is real.
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To submit complaints about the FCC getting rid of Net Neutrality, you can go here, then click "+Express" and fill out the form.

http://www.gofccyourself.com/
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Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Cool thank you
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Expert Comment

by:Juana Villa
Done :D
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
@Brian I could be off in my interpretation of how this will unfold, but I believe what will happen is your cost to the ISP will likely not be effected so much, who knows it might even go down. Your local ISPs are the ones who benefit the most from this, since they are the last mile to your house from the tier1 providers. They are the ones who can throttle content to the end user, until someone pads their coffers.

So in theory the tier1 provider (ie. Cogent) has to pay more to the last mile isp (ie. Charter) to prevent throttling, and the costs are ultimately passed on to the game service provider (ie. Sony/Xbox/etc) in a form of higher bandwidth costs for their game servers.  In turn, the game service provider will pass that cost on to you, in order to access the service. In theory, this would effect all of the services you enjoy (Netflix, Sony, Hulu, etc.) and each one of them would be passing higher access costs over to you.

So instead of having 1 higher bill (your ISP), you'll have dozens of higher bills.

I could be misunderstanding this entirely, but that's how I see it unfolding.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
@lucas: Agreed, that's certainly one way it could unfold. I could even foresee some combination of the two approaches: one where there's extra cost from my ISP for certain types of traffic prioritization, and the other where certain services have to increase their rates to ensure top tier speeds.

There is one other scenario that could play out, which is the one that free-market evangelists would hope for: that this whole thing finally provides enough incentive to open up more competition in the ISP market. If my provider is doing things like selling the data on my browsing history and throttling my bandwidth based on types of services used, that it provides an opportunity for a new competitor to differentiate their service. After all, the real root of the fears regarding a lack of net-neutrality stems from the lack of consumer choice (at least in the U.S., I can't really speak for other countries). I'm not really optimistic about this scenario happening, but I'd love to be proven wrong.
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Tech Policy

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