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Tech Policy

A rule or regulation put into place by governing bodies on technology practices, access of user devices, patents and intellectual property, provider regulations, and much more.

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Let's take a look back at the commercialization of the internet to understand why keeping it open and neutral is in our best interest as a society.
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Learn why we support net neutrality and why the topic is important to all internet users.
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Expert Comment

by:David
Comment Utility
How it *should* be is that both you and your ISP have the option to make that decision in the first place.  An ISP is in business to make money, and if there is a market for a sustained throughput product,  you can bet your life they will offer it, and then customers will be free to decide if they want such a thing.  

Surely you don't have a problem allowing people to purchase internet packages of different bandwidths.   Yet you are arguing for a one-size-fits all package where you VOIP traffic or streaming video site has dropped packets and choppy sound because somebody using the same ISP is spamming mailboxes and spam traffic is treated exactly the same.

You can't have it both ways.   You can't make an argument against allowing people to buy a package from an ISP for bandwidth for one protocol without saying you're against allowing ISPs to offer more than one speed for all protocols.   It is hypocritical to say people shouldn't be allowed to buy faster internet speeds for a specific protocol ... unless you also say that providers should only offer one speed for everything, regardless of what their needs are.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Comment Utility
Thanks for the response, David! It's nice hearing the counterpoint. Something that's been very tricky about this issue is how there is certainly some potential for good improvements that could come of more technical freedom for the infrastructure. I could see allowing some sort of prioritization for "emergency" traffic, much like we do for fire trucks and ambulances on roadways, for example... But if left up to an ISP, what would be termed "emergency" traffic? The highest bidder?

If the ISP starts saying that some traffic types are more important than others (i.e. VOIP more important than mass emails) then won't some people start thinking that their email is more important than when I'm trying to play World of Warcraft (a claim I'll disagree with ;-)

I think the key dividing line may be in how much someone trusts the big carriers to use their powers for good. And personally, I really don't. Perhaps it's because the one truly terrible customer service experience I've ever encountered, the one time I got seriously angry, was with my cable company...

Another point: In your example, you mention VOIP service being impacted by spam. But ultimately, why would I not get my throughput? Is the argument for eliminating net neutrality in order to bring about speed improvements really just a way to try to avoid overall bandwidth improvements?
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Tech Policy

A rule or regulation put into place by governing bodies on technology practices, access of user devices, patents and intellectual property, provider regulations, and much more.

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