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VMware is virtual machine software that provides a virtualized set of hardware (a video adapter, a network adapter, and hard disk adapters) to the guest operating system. VMware virtual machines become highly portable between computers, because every host looks nearly identical to the guest. In practice, a system administrator can pause operations on a virtual machine guest, move or copy that guest to another physical computer, and there resume execution exactly at the point of suspension. VMware's enterprise software hypervisors for servers, VMware ESX and VMware ESXi are bare-metal embedded Hypervisors that run directly on server hardware without requiring an additional underlying operating system.

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This Tutorial covers a very basic and common question asked on Experts Exchange, "How Do I Clone or Copy a virtual machine in VMware vSphere Hypervisor ESX/ESXi 4.x, ESXi 5.0?"

Using the following method, no third party tools are required or need to be installed, other than the VMware vSphere Client.. The VMware vSphere Client is used to manage a VMware vSphere Hypervisor ESX/ESXi 4.x, ESXi 5.0 host server. This procedure can be used when connected directly to the host server or VMware vSphere vCenter Management Server.

1. Connect to the VMware vSphere Hypervisor Server


Using the VMware vSphere Client, login and connect to the ESX/ESXi server, using the IP address or hostname of the ESX/ESXi server, using the root username and password credentials. If you have a VMware vSphere vCenter server, you could also specify IP address or hostname of the vCenter server which manages your ESX/ESXi servers.

Using the VMware vSphere Client, login and connect to the VMware ESX/ESXi server

2. Select and browse the datastore


Once connected to the server, the VMware vSphere Client will display the following inventory of the VMware vSphere ESX/ESXi server.

Connected to VMware ESX/ESXi server
The datastore properties are shown on the right hand side

Datastore Properties
Select the datastore, if you've not rename the datastore, the datastore default name is datastore1.

Right Click the datastore datastore1 and select Browse datastore. All VMware virtual machine files are stored in the datastore.

Browse Datastore

3. Select the correct virtual machine folder


The Datastore Browser will open and show the contents of the datastore. The virtual machines are stored in folders.

Datastore Browser - datastore contents
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Expert Comment

by:bstevens1964
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WHAT FILES DO i NEED TO COPY IN ORDER TO GET THE C:\  ONLY AND NOT THE SHARE DRIVES THAT ARE ATTACHED? I HAVE A FILE SERVER THAT I NEED JUST THE OS DRIVE AND NOT FILE SHARES.
THANKS
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by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
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@bstevens1964 Please post a question and myself or other experts will be glad to assist.
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Using a software based iSCSI solution, there is no requirement to purchase a hardware iSCSI initiator or TOE (TCP/IP Offload Engine) interface card. A standard network interface card can be used to connect an existing ESXi server to a remote iSCSI target or iSCSI SAN on the TCP/IP storage network. The iSCSI Software Adapter built into the VMKenerl interface, completes the communication between the network interface card and the host server network stack.

This tutorial can be used to add an iSCSI Software Adapter and create an iSCSI Multipath Network in VMware vSphere Hypervisor ESXi 5.0, using the new Network Configuration iSCSI Bindings option in the vSphere Client GUI. In older versions of ESX/ESXi bindings needed to be completed at the command line.

1. Connect to the VMware vSphere Hypervisor (ESXi 5.0) Server


Using the VMware vSphere Client, login and connect to the ESXi 5.0 server, using IP address or hostname of the ESXi 5.0 server, using root username and password credentials. If you have a VMware vSphere vCenter server, you could also specify IP address or hostname of the vCenter server which manages your vSphere 5 ESXi 5.0 server.

 Using the VMware vSphere Client, login and connect to the ESXi 5.0 server

2. Select and Configure the Storage Adapters for the ESXi 5.0 server


When connected to the ESXi server, select the Host Server, Configuration tab, and select Storage Adapters. Please note, if you do not have any persistent storage …
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by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
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@RantCan

Thanks for your kind words.

Andy
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Expert Comment

by:WellingtonIS
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Yes he's great!  I think my issue lies in the network card it's only seeing once card and not the GBIC's attached.  I'm going to try to configure them in the bios under ISCSI and see if it will then be seen by the VM. If not, then we'll have to buy and additional Ethernet card for this machine.
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Using a software based iSCSI solution, there is no requirement to purchase an hardware iSCSI initiator or TOE (TCP/IP Offload Engine) interface card. A standard network interface card, can be used to connect and existing ESXi server to a remote iSCSI target or iSCSI SAN on the TCP/IP storage network. The iSCSI Software Adapter built into the VMKenerl interface, completes the communication between the network interface card and the host server network stack.

This tutorial can be used to add an iSCSI Software Adapter and create an iSCSI Multipath Network in VMware vSphere Hypervisor ESXi 4.1.

1. Connect to the VMware vSphere Hypervisor (ESXi 4.1) Server


Using the VMware vSphere Client, login and connect to the ESXi 4.1 server, using IP address or hostname of the ESXi 4.1 server, using root username and password credentials. If you have a VMware vSphere vCenter server, you could also specify IP address or hostname of the vCenter server which manages your vSphere 4 ESXi 4.1 server.

Using the VMware vSphere Client, login and connect to the ESXi 4.1 server

2. Select and Configure the Storage Adapters for the ESXi server


When connected to the ESXi server, select the Host Server, Configuration tab, and select Storage Adapters. Please note, if you do not have any persistent storage connected to the ESXi server, a yellow warning configuration box will appear. This example server used in this tutorial does not have any local SAS or SATA storage connected. Once the iSCSI Software Adapter has been added, iSCSI storage can be added, and this yellow warning configuration box will disappear.

select Storage Adaptors
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Expert Comment

by:global-e
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Hi,

Great article :) But the last commands to bind the adapter is realy tricky:

esxcli swiscsi nic add -n vmk1 -d vmhba33
esxcli swiscsi nic add -n vmk2 -d vmhba33

First check the NIC's with:
esxcfg-vmknic -l

My Output:
vmk2       VMkernel iSCSI Network 1IPv4      172.16.238.10                           255.255.255.0   172.16.238.255  00:50:56:75:01:55 1500    65535     true    STATIC
vmk3      VMkernel iSCSI Network 2IPv4      172.16.239.10                           255.255.255.0   172.16.239.255  00:50:56:71:4a:1f 1500    65535     true    STATIC

So the commands to bind in my situation is:
esxcli swiscsi nic add -n vmk2 -d vmhba33
esxcli swiscsi nic add -n vmk3 -d vmhba33
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by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
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Thanks for your kind comments, hence why in later versions we now have a GUI to complete the bindings!
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In this article, I am going to expose some of the hidden, undocumented, unsupported features and functions of the VMware vSphere Hypervisor (ESXi).

VMware vSphere ESXi 4.x, and ESXi 5.0 does not officially support Raw Disk Mapping of Local Storage e.g SATA, SAS or SCSI disks.

Please use at your own risk, and if you do escalate a Support Request (SR) to VMware Support, do not be surprised if they state this is unsupported.


VMware's definition of an RDM
'Introduced with VMware ESX Server 2.5, raw device mapping allows a special file in a VMFS volume to act as a proxy for a raw device. The mapping file contains metadata used to manage and redirect disk accesses to the physical device. The mapping file gives you some of the advantages of a virtual disk in the VMFS file system, while keeping some advantages of direct access to physical device characteristics. In effect, it merges VMFS manageability with raw device access.'

Traditionally and VMware supported, a Raw Disk Mapping (RDM) which may be used to present a LUN directly to a virtual machine from a SAN. The SAN could be Fibre Channel or iSCSI.

Why would we want to create a Raw Disk Mapping (RDM) of a local storage device?

An RDM can offer improved performance, which can be used for more disk I/O intensive applications such as database servers.
You may already have a data partition on the disk you want to present directly to the VM.
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Expert Comment

by:Tech Savy
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Hello

It is a pleasure to even ask you a question.

The file server itself is a virtual machine running on a VMware ESXi 5.1.0 host. The D: drive is a Mapped Raw LUN which resides on a HP Lefthand SAN cluster connected via an iSCSI network

The problem is intermittent, the drive is not accessible even from the virtual machine. I checked event viewer logs to get to know the problem, but there were no logs generated. Is there a way to find out why would it be not accessible.

Your advice would be a life saver.

Thanks
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
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@rauldeshmukh

Please post a question in the VMware Zone, for myself or other Experts to Answer.

Thanks
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In VMware vSphere 4 1 and 5.0, if you have two or more hosts, using shared storage, (SAN/NAS) you can create a VMware vSphere Cluster and enable High Availability mode (HA), if you have the correct VMware vSphere Licensing.

VMware vSphere High Availability (HA) provides easy to use, cost effective high availability for applications running in virtual machines. In the event of VMware vSphere server failure, affected virtual machines are automatically restarted on other VMware vSphere production servers with spare capacity.

You may have noticed that after Turning On vSphere HA in Cluster settings from the vSphere Client that a Configuration Issues warning yellow box may appear on the Summary page of ALL host ESXi servers in the vSphere Cluster.

The Configuration Issue reports This host currently has no management network redundancy
The Configuration Issues reports "This host currently has no management network redundancy"

You will also notice there is also a yellow/orange warning triangle displayed on ALL the vSphere ESXi host servers in the vSphere Cluster.

 Warning trianles on hosts in vSphere Cluster
The only issue, is that the Warning triangle displayed in VMware vSphere vCenter can mask real warning events.

VMware vSphere HA will still function correctly, the configuration issue, is warning that there is only one physical network interface connected to the virtual vswitch which has the service console (ESX) or management network interface (ESXi) connected.

example vSwitch with single physical network interface vmnic0

 vSwitch example
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Expert Comment

by:*** Hopeleonie ***
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"Yes" vote above.
Your Tutorials helped me everytime!
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In vSphere 4 1 and 5.0, you can enable both Remote SSH and the ESXi Shell for management of hosts from the vSphere Client and from the Direct Console User Interface.

You may have noticed that on enabling both Remote SSH and the ESXi Shell for management of hosts from the vSphere Client and from the Direct Console User Interface that a Configuration Issues warning yellow box appears on the Summary page of the host ESXi server.

This Configuration Issues warning yellow box only appears when Remote SSH and/or ESXi shell has been enabled.

Configuration Issues, SSH and ESXi shell enabled
If you are also connected to a Windows vCenter Server using the vSphere Client, you will also notice there is also a yellow/orange warning triangle displayed on the host server.

vCenter Configuration Issue
There is no vSphere ESXi configuration issue, VMware vSphere Hypervisor (ESXi) and VMware vSphere vCenter server are indicating there is a possible security issue with your installation, you may not be aware that SSH and ESXi shell have been enabled.

VMware state[b] "This message is a proactive security measure designed to ensure that administrators are aware that remote access has been enabled for the server."[/b]

The only issue, is that the Warning triangle displayed in VMware vSphere vCenter can mask real warning events.

These configuration issues and warnings alert triangle, can be suppressed as follows

1. Connect to the VMware vSphere Hypervisor (ESXi) or VMware vSphere vCenter Server

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The original payload size or maximum transmission unit (MTU) of an ethernet frame is 1500 bytes. A jumbo frame has an ethernet frame size of 9000 bytes or over. Common Jumbo Frame sizes are 9000, 9216 bytes (example - HP switches).

Enabling Jumbo Frames may help reduce storage latency and increase storage throughput when used in conjunction with iSCSI or NFS storage network protocols with a VMware vSphere Hypervisor (ESXi 5.0) host server and a storage area network (SAN) or network attached storage (NAS) device.

Before enabling Jumbo Frames on an ESXi 5.0 server, check

(i) ensure the servers network interface card can support jumbo frames. Check with server or network manufacturer.
(ii) network switches support the use of jumbo frames, and enable jumbo frames on the network switches. Not all switches support the use of jumbo frames.
(iii) the SAN or NAS supports jumbo frames, and is enabled accordingly to manufacturers instructions.

The end to end network topology must support jumbo frames, otherwise ethernet frame packets will become fragmented, and performance will be degraded.

1. Connect to the VMware vSphere Hypervisor (ESXi 5.0) Server


Using the VMware vSphere Client, Login and Connect to the ESXi 5.0 server, using IP address or hostname of the ESXi 5.0 server, using root username and password credentials. If you have a VMware vSphere vCenter server, you could also specify IP address or hostname of the vCenter server.

Using the VMware vSphere Client, Login and Connect to the ESXi 5.0 server

2. Select the Configuration Tab


Once you are logged into and connected to the host ESXi 5.0 server, Select the
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Expert Comment

by:Sudeep Sharma
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Hi Andrew,

Would it be possible for you to post the article for changing the jumbo frames on vCenter 6 through web interface (not VMware client).

Thanks,
Sudeep
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by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
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@Sudeep Sharma

Thanks for your comments, in the future, but by the time I've written the article, you have worked out how to do it...

In the future, I intend, to redo all the articles from the Web Client, or ESXi Web Client in versions 6.5 or 7.0!
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VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.0 is a FREE tool available from VMware upon registration, the purpose of this software tool is to easily convert physical or virtual computers, images of computers to VMware virtual machines. Server and Workstation operating systems are supported in the conversion.

Download VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.0 here
VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.0 Documentation
VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.0 User Guide

In September 2011, VMware released version 5.0 of VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.0, with many new features including partition alignment important for aligning partitions correctly on storage array networks (SAN).

BUT, we've noticed that completing conversions using VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.0 compared to using VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 4.3, were taking much longer, and the transfer rate of a conversion had become degraded when using version 5.0.

The following modification will improve the transfer rate when using VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.0, to similar transfer rates obtained when using VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 4.3 to perform conversions.

It would appear that VMware uses a …
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Expert Comment

by:Mathiau
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Wow ya, seems a few have kept it going..lol
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
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@Mathiau - The problem is the "cut and paste" and Google Monkeys, and have no idea, this has changed, three years later, because they have no experience, other than Google!

So 10 out of 10.....Mathiau for at least knowing what we call in the trade a "golden nugget!"

Thanks

Andy
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I have installed vmware Esxi 5 , it was all working fine. But one day I faced a problem when loading modules of vsphere 5 , Vmware ESxi 5 hung on loading with the message “cnic_Register Loaded Sucessfully”

I read too many articles but found no article explaining this problem or the problem never happened with someone before. So, it appears to be the first strange problem. However the vmware vsphere 5 installed on HP Proliant G6 with 64 GB RAM and 2 CPU's was working fine and all Machines running smoothly with scheduled shared resources. We needed to reboot the machine manually then I would loose the connection to Vsphere , it's still working although the message on the server screen still appears and server still work using vmware vsphere client. But later on I got everything stopped and server with no response... I can not ping it either.

This article explains and presents a solution for this kind of problem. I hope you will find it easy and useful !

While loading the yellow screen appear and modules of esxi 5 loading , the message appears says “Cinc_register Loaded sucessfully” , then ESxi hang , you are unable to ping the host or access it from anywhere no ssh no vshpere client.

causes :

internal problem with vmware esxi vmkernel.

resolution :

boot for vmware esxi CD , follow instructions , after finding hard disk , an 3 options will appear :

- upgrade esxi 5 , preserve data store.

- install esxi 5 , preserve data store.

- …
2

Expert Comment

by:mp55
Comment Utility
Forgot to mention that even when the machine was stuck, after 5-10 mins i could see the VMs in vsphere, so in theory i could move them.
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Expert Comment

by:cnewts79
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Loaded the ESXi CD. During initialization received an install message that No Network Cards identified, possibly due to NIC drivers not on installation media. Only option was to cancel, exit reboot server. Install did not complete.
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Problem : Unsupported or invalid disk type 7. Ensure that the disk has been imported.

You can run into this problem when you try to power on virtual machine on Esxi that converted from physical to virtual machine. An error message prompt and running of vm will stop. The message looks something like :

Module DevicePowerOn power on failed. Unable to create virtual SCSI device  for scsi0:0,  
'/vmfs/volumes/4e981593-1bbfd9e3-cbe6-00237de1f462/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx.vmdk'
Failed to open disk scsi0:0:
Unsupported or invalid disk type 7. Ensure that the disk has been imported.

This problem occurs when you are converting physical machine to virtual one , actually the The VMs were converted and set to preserve the controller, which was IDE. The disks were also in sparse format. The VM would not boot because the controller was set to lsi sas which will not work with sparse disks. If this is changed then the VM will power up successfully.

Resolution :

Method 1 :

First up, open putty SSH session then type the following :
cd vmfs
cd volumes
cd datastore1

Open in new window

note that datastore1 is sample name , just type your datastore name , if you don't know what is it , just type "ls" after volumes you will see a folder in greeny color , it's the datastore name.

Then type :
mkfstools -i xxxxxx.vmdk xxxx-New.vmdk

Open in new window

note that xxxxx is disk name of the related virtual machine , the process will convert  disk type to zerothick , if the process success try to run your machine , if its not successful the following message may appear :

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Author Comment

by:Maen Abu-Tabanjeh
Comment Utility
thank you martin81 for correction :)
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Expert Comment

by:amanzoor
Comment Utility
Thanks a lot Jordannet, very easy to understand article.  Method 1 worked for me, flawless.
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Beacon probing is a configurable network failure detection mechanism used by ESX to identify downstream network failures. The purpose of this article is to explain some of the mystery and clarify a commonly misunderstood subject. The information in this article was gathered through direct observation and discussions with VMware.

As opposed to “Link Status Only,” beacon probing can identify a downstream failure. In the event that a failure does not cause a link-down event or if the link-down state is not forwarded to the ESX host, beacon probing can identify and compensate for network failure. Beacon probing works in conjunction with link status, and link-state-down will still trigger a failover if beacon probing is enabled.

Beacon probing identifies failures by sending out and listening for broadcast packets of a specific type. ESX 4.1 uses ethertype 0x8922, ESX 4.0 uses an 802.3 frame which is displayed in Wireshark as an LLC frame with “BCN (0xFF)” in the control field. ESX 3.5 uses an ethertype of 0x05ff. The probes contain the virtual MAC associated with the physical NIC and the name of the interface.

When virtual switch tagging is used, beacon probing sends one packet per host, per second, per in-use VLAN. Meaning the probes are sent down VLANs on which there are virtual machines (this includes the ESX service console). In the case of two interfaces, each interface will send one probe every other second. A failure is identified if 3 consecutive packets are not…
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The High Availability (HA) feature in vSphere 4.1 allows a group of ESX/ESXi hosts in a cluster to identify individual host failures and thereby provide for higher availability of hosted VMs.  HA will restart VMs which were running on a failed host; it is a high-availability solution, not a zero-downtime solution such as application clustering or VMware Fault Tolerance.  There will be a period of time when VMs are offline following a physical host failure, this is important to understand and you should ensure that your customers and management are aware of this.  HA is a complex topic, but setting it up and using it are fairly straight-forward.  This article is meant as a quick technical overview of HA to provide administrators with an understanding of its components and functionality; it by no means covers every detail.  

  In vSphere 4.1, HA can work with and utilize Distributed Resource Scheduler (DRS) if it is also enabled on the cluster so it is important to understand what DRS is…though a full description of DRS is outside the scope of this article.  DRS continuously monitors the resource usage of hosts within a cluster and can suggest or automatically migrate (vMotion) a VM from one host to another to balance out the resource usage across the cluster as a whole and prevent any single host from becoming over-utilized.  HA is based on Legato’s Automated Availability Manager, and as such you will see some HA-related files and logs on an ESX host labeled with “AAM”.  HA…
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vSphere 4.1 includes a self-signed SSL certificate upon installation.  In some situations, especially in larger environments with an existing PKI infrastructure, you may need to replace this with a valid SSL certificate for your environment.  VMware published a document (linked below) on doing this, however it can be a little confusing and I had to do some extra googling to figure out/understand the entire process, so I’ve broken it down into (hopefully) easy to follow steps.  These steps assume you have an existing vCenter instance in place and the file paths are valid for Server 2008 R2 (if you’re using Server 2003 adjust accordingly).  I hope someone finds this useful!

1.      Obtain openssl from the openssl.org and copy it to the vCenter host.
2.      Install openssl using all defaults.  
3.      Create a directory on the C: drive named “ssl”.
4.      Browse to C:\Users\All Users\VMware\VMware VirtualCenter\SSL
5.      Copy the rui.key file to C:\ssl
6.      Open a command prompt by clicking Start, right-clicking on the Command Line icon and selecting Run as administrator.
7.      Click Yes when prompted.
8.      Change directories to C:\ssl (cd c:\ssl)
9.      Use openssl to create a certificate signing request for the vCenter host, as indicated here (note the keylength is 2048-bits, your environment may require something different):

c:\openssl-win64\bin\openssl.exe req -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout rui.key -nodes -days 3650

10.      Enter the Country, State, locality, organization, Organizational Unit, and…
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I have recently deployed a VMware View 4.6 virtual desktop infrastructure and the last part of the project was to install the Security Server for remote users to access a virtual desktop from outside of the network.

The server installation was straight forward and everything worked fine but was installed with the default (unsigned) SSL certificate and required our own to be installed. Whilst the VMware KB article (1030298) explains how to do this, I found this method much easier.


Prerequisites

This tutorial presumes you already have a certificate. If you have a certificate which isn't in a PKCS#12/PFX format, you can convert it online:

https://www.sslshopper.com/ssl-converter.html

Once you have converted it, or if you already have a PKCS#12/PFX format certificate, make sure the extension is .p12 (rename it if you have to).


Installation

On your Security Server, copy your .p12 certificate to the following folder (presuming you have installed to the default location):

C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware View\Server\sslgateway\conf\

In the same folder, create a new text document called 'locked.properties' (no quotes, no .txt extension). Open this file in Notepad and enter the following text:

keyfile=certificate_name.p12
keypass=password

Change the 'certificate_name.p12' to the filename of your certificate, and 'password' to the password you specified when converting or exporting the certificate originally. Save the file and exit …
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VMware ESX/ESXi Backup Guide

If you have a licensed version of ESX/ESXi, (paid for license) you could purchase the following third party applications to perform backups. If you do not have a licensed version of ESX/ESXi, your options are limited, because a non-licensed (paid for) version does not give access to the licensed APIs for third party products to function. You will there for need at least a Standard license for ESX/ESXi for the following products listed in 1 to 3 below.

1. Veeam Backup and Replication v5 - very popular, won many awards at VMworld 2010

Download a trial here - http://www.veeam.com/vmware-esx-backup.html

2. Quest Vizioncore Vranger Pro - the first VM backup product with a good pedigree.

Download a trial here - http://vizioncore.com/product/vRangerPro

3. PHD Virtual Backup - very fast backup technology, using virtual applicance.

Download a trial here - http://www.phdvirtual.com/phd-vb-51-vmware-vsphere

4. VMware Data Recovery - supports dedupe, integrated with vCenter - maybe included with your current VMware License (available in vSphere Enterprise Plus, Advanced, and Essentials Plus Editions. VMware Data Recovery can also be purchased a la carte with vSphere Standard Edition.)

http://www.vmware.com/products/data-recovery/overview.html

Free (download) alternatives for backing up VMs

5. ghettoVCB

http://communities.vmware.com/docs/DOC-8760
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Expert Comment

by:Aaron Tomosky
Comment Utility
I actually do use san snapshots (freebsd zfs san but compression only, not dedupe), and replicate to a second san as backup. However the problem is that until esxi supports nfs4 and subfolder mounts, I put all my vms into one file system as an nfs share. So vmwaredr allows me to do individual vm restores easily. I know I could do iscsi mounts and a lun for each vm, but the nfs way works great and is so easy to setup and maintain.

I also know that I can restore individual virtual machines out of the zfs snapshots, but thats more of a backup of my backup ;)
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How to Backup ESXi installation on a USB flash drive or SD card.

Requirements

1. A valid ESXi installation on a USB flash drive or SD card.
2. A copy of Winimage for Windows.
3. A Windows computer.
4. Optional Blank DVD for making backup.
5. Optional USB flash drive or SD card for flash backup.

1. Download Winimage from the Internet


Using your internet browser, Internet Explorer or Mozilla, download a copy of Winimage from http://www.winimage.com/download.htm.

WinImage is a shareware product. You may copy, distribute, and try it for free, but if you use for longer than the evaluation period, you must register. You will receive a valid license, a registration code and the latest release.

2. Install Winimage


Install Winimage as per the vendors instructions on your Windows computer you need to backup the USB flash drive or SD card.

3. Insert the ESXi USB flash drive or in USB port on computer


Insert the ESXi USB flash drive or SD card inserted in a card reader into the computer you have installed Winimage on.

4. Start Winimage


 Winimage Startup
Start Winimage from the Start Menu on your Windows computer.

5. From the disk menu


 Create Virtual Hard Disk
From the disk menu, in Winimage, select Creating Virtual Hard Disk Image from Physical Drive.

6. Select the USB flash drive or SD card


See picture below

Select a physical drive in the list
Select the USB flash drive or SD card, from the list, in this example, I'm using a Flash LUXIO USB flash drive.

7. Select Create Fixed Size Virtual Hard Disk


 Select usb flash drive
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
Comment Utility
Please post an EE Question.
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Expert Comment

by:Frosty555
Comment Utility
I would have though that this question would be a relevant follow-up question that anybody reading this article would want to know - after all, your backup is worthless unless you have confidence in the restoration.

In any case, here's the question:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/VMWare/Q_28239655.html
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Hi Guys

Recently, I set up a vsphere lab at home and thought I would share my experience in this article with the hope it will help other like minded people.

To build a whitebox ( a whitebox is a a self build server ) that you build your self as buying a vsphere 4 server of ebay like a hp dl server as the sellers know its vsphere capable they are more expensive than say an esx 3.5 capable server. esx 3.5 is basically the 32bit version of vsphere 4 as that is the 64 bit version.

There are a few whitebox hcl's for getting the information required on motherboards, network cards and sata/sas raid controller. I use http://www.vm-help.com/esx40i/esx40_whitebox_HCL.php 

The main problem with esx in general is esxi is very finicky with  motherboards, nics and hdd controllers especially built in devices on the motherboard. Even if your motherboard nics and hdd controllers you can disable the built-in devices and purchase specific nics and hdd controllers from the whitebox hcl.

For instance with nics I prefer Intel pro 1gbE pci-e x4 cards you can get a dual port intel server adapter for £40 - £80 as a dual port allows team bonding for instance.

It's also a good idea to make your vsphere server have multiple gbE nics as really you need a san to do iscsi for vsphere advanced tasks like vmotion and drs as these work in the 60 day version of vsphere 4.1.

Also, to do these advanced vsphere tasks you need a san for iscsi and I use openfiler for that as that can do …
1

Expert Comment

by:ortuno2k
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Ii recently installed ESXi in my home PC, using regular desktop PC components and had good results.

My system is as follows:

Asus M4A89GTD PRO/USB 3
AMD Phenom II X4 955 BE
CORSAIR XMS3 DDR3 RAM, PC 1333 (12 GB)
CORSAIR TX650 PSU
CoolerMaster CM690 Case
LG DVD-RW Drive
Intel 1000 Pro 1000 GT
2 GB USB no-name flash drive (to install ESXi)
WD 120 GB Sata Drive (used for storage)

The ESXi software (4.1) would not install without the Intel NIC. The on-board NIC is not recognized by the ESXi installer, so the installation would crash with an error each time I tried. The Intel card is a must for this system - unless you go through a software workaround and find a patched file for the onboard NIC. The easiest way is to get the Intel card.

I had no need to turn off any devices in the BIOS, and was able to use my wireless Logitech keyboard and USB mouse.

Installation was quite easy: Pop-in the installable 4.1 CD and boot from the optical drive.
The ESXi installer did its thing, and when asked where I wanted to install the software, I chose the USB flash drive.

The rest of the installation went without hiccups, and I was able to run ESXi on the machine for a few days.

I did this just for testing purposes, and to make sure that the hardware was compatible. I plan to build a machine with similar specs to use as a dedicated ESXi home-lab server.
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by:IanTh
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yes my first esx server was a core 2 quad with 8gb ram and its internal ich9 sata ports worked it was just the nic realtek that didn't you can get a realtek nic working if you trawl google. Ich10 works in esx too
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In this article I will like to share some of my experience in P2V Physical Windows Servers.

This tutorial will use as a Single Cold Migration, but many of the pre and post tasks, can be used in a Standalone Migration.  Additionally, this article will focus on Windows Operating System Servers  that are either Physical Servers with local disks or with storage disks.

--------------------------------------- // ---------------------------------------
This guide describes the procedure to convert/Migrate a Physical Server to Virtual Server (P2V) in Windows Servers.

At the end of this document you will be able to:

•      Follow all the requirements analysis to migrate Windows servers to Virtual Server(P2V):
•      Follow all the pre- tasks before P2V Windows Server.
•      Use vConverter Boot CD to P2V (single cold migration) Windows Servers.
•      Follow post-tasks after P2V Windows Server
.

> Required software

VMware vCenter Converter Boot CD.
P2V Scripts.

> P2V requirement analysis and check.

•       Check for any System Operation issues or Hardware issues, regarding P2V this SO or this type of Hardware.
http://www.vmware.com/support/pubs/converter_pubs.html 

Note: Check the type of Windows Server license. OEM licenses or Appliance Editions cannot be P2V or will need special attention.

•      Check the Physical Server Applications and is Server for any issues regarding Virtualization methods.
•      Check Storage in the
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Expert Comment

by:Gaganpreet Singh
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Thanks for sharing the documents
Please let me know how much time it takes for 5tb P2V
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by:Kyle Santos
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@Gaganpreet

Ask a question related to this article so the experts can try and help you.  In the nav, click Ask a question and in your post provide the URL to this article.
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vSphere introduces a new type of memory management to the mix, memory compression. The following is a quick breakdown of how an ESX/ESXi 4.1 host manages memory at various levels and how memory resources are managed under the hood when memory contention comes into play. Clusters, resource pools and other vCenter level resource management techniques are beyond the scope of this article, I’ll save those for another day. For a full rundown, see VMware’s Understanding Memory Resource Management in VMware ESX4.

The reasoning behind these memory management techniques is to allow for higher memory utilization and to allow for a higher VM-to-host consolidation ratio by enabling memory overcommitment. All physical memory mapped to a VM is zeroed out prior to allocation, which prevents data leakage across VM boundaries.

Memory resource levels:
-Guest Virtual memory (guest OS): Memory presented to an application, granted by the guest OS which maps to guest physical RAM.
-Guest Physical memory (VM): Memory configured at the VM level, backed by Host RAM.
-Host Physical memory: Physical RAM installed on the host.

ESX provides memory translation between the guest physical and host physical memory in the form of a data structure called a pmap. ESX intercepts all VM instructions which modify the translation lookaside buffer (TLB) that maintains the mapping of guest virtual to guest physical memory, and stores the changes in Shadow Page Tables which are used to…
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To date, the MTU setting is not exposed via the GUI when creating a vmknic, and you cannot directly add a vmknic to a dvSwitch via the command line, so a workaround is needed. Keep in mind that for jumbo frames to be effective it must be enabled end-to-end, meaning that your vmknic, vSwitch, physical switch, and SAN must all be configured the same.  Here’s how I do it on ESXi 4.1 using vMA.

What you will need:
-vMA (free download from VMware)
-ESXi
-vCenter

First, install vMA:
1. Using the vSphere Client, connect to the vCenter server.
2. Right-click any host and select File > Deploy OVF Template.
3. In the wizard, select Deploy from file.
4. Click Browse, select the OVF and click Next.
5. Click Next when the download details are displayed.
6. Accept the license agreement.
7. Specify the name of the virtual machine.
8. Select the location for the VM.
9. Select the resource pool, if applicable.
10. Select the datastore for the VM.
11. Select the network mapping. We will select the dvPort Group associated with your Management Network so the vMA VM will have network access to the Management connections of your ESXi hosts.
12. Review the information and click Finish.

Now, configure it:
1. In the vSphere Client, right-click the virtual machine, and click Power On.
2. Select the Console tab.
3. Answer the network configuration prompts. You will need to enter valid networking information for the network your ESXi host reside on.
4. When prompted, specify…
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Hi,

Linked clones help you save more space on your datastore when you create multiple virtual machines using the same master image (Parent image).

In order to create a linked clone you will need to have VMWare View composer installed on your vCenter.

If you are using VMWare View to deploy VMs, and assign to users you may have used Linked clones (View Composer). In this case a Replica folder is created which is attached to the master Clone, and it has all kind of vmx, vmdk, ... files.

When you want to migrate a VM that has a replica to another datastore, you get the following error: " A general system error occured: The virtual machine has virtual disk in link-cloned mode that prevents migration", however if the machine is offline you can migrate to another DS with no problem but it will lose the link to it's replica, and users will lose their profile settings.

A workaround for this problem is to use the Rebalance feature in VMware View, you will need to change the datastore in the Pool settings first.

0. Go to VMWare View Administration page (https://IPaddress of the connection server/admin)
1. Go to Desktop and Pools, from the left pane select the Pool which has the VMs that you want to migrate to another DS
2. Click edit/ go to datastore, deselect the current DS, and select the DS that you want to migrate the Link Cloned VMs to/ click finish
3. Go to desktop Source/ click on rebalance, Next, Next, Next, and it will migrate all the VMs to another …
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The overall configuration really depends on whether or not you are using vLANs, multipathing, jumbo frames, trunking, number of uplinks on your ESX hosts, etc.  

For a very simple config to get yourself up and running with the built-in Software iSCSI Adapter in ESX using a single Cisco swtich (can be any GbE switch, really), do the following.  This is ideal for a lab or test environment.  

Note: Anywhere that I use the term "SAN", substitute whatever you are using to provide or emulate iSCSI storage, be it Openfiler or another hardware implementation.

1) Connect  one or two (for redundancy) uplinks on your ESX host to the switch using a CAT6 cable.

2) Connect the SAN iSCSI ports to the same switch and assign the iSCSI initiators on the SAN IP addresses.

3) Create a new vSwitch on your ESX host and configure it to use the uplink(s) you connected to the Cisco switch.

4) Create a new vmkernel network connection on that vSwitch and assign it an IP on the same subnet as the iSCSI SAN.

5) Connect to that ESX host using the vSphere client (or go through vCenter if you have it).

6) Click on the Configuration tab, select Storage Adapters.

7) Highlight the Software iSCSI Adapter and click Properties.

8) Click Advanced and check the box for Enabled and click Ok.

9) Go back into the properties of the Software iSCSI Adapter.  On the Static Targets tab enter the IP addresses of the iSCSI targets on your SAN
2

Expert Comment

by:IT_Group1
Comment Utility
Very nice article! Thx
0
VMWare Server Infrastructure's Management Console is now a web-based management console.  This console is accessed via https://<machinename>:8333/ui/# where <machinename> is either the name of the machine where the software is installed or can optionally be replaced with the IP address of that machine.

To connect to the management console, SSL encryption is employed (hence the https:// prefix), however, the certificate that is generated during the installation is for the machine to which it is installed and is not trusted as originating from any trusted root authorities.  Because of this, an annoying message is displayed informing the user to beware:

Certificate Not Trusted
The browser can be configured to trust this certificate as follows:

1

Select Continue to this website (not recommended) as illustrated in the above image.

2

Left-Click Certificate Error in the web address bar.
Untrusted Certificate

3

Left-Click View certificates in the Untrusted Certificate dialog box.

4

Once the Certificate is displayed, left-click Install Certificate... from the Certificate dialog box.
Install Certificate - General

5

On the Certificate Import Wizard dialog's Welcome panel, left-click Next.
Certificate Import - Welcome

6

On the Certificate Store panel, select Place all certificates in the following store and left-click Browse...
Certificate Import - Certificate Select

7

On the Select Certificate Store dialog, select the Trusted Root Certification Authorities certificate store by left-clicking it to highlight it, then left-click Ok.
Select Certificate Store

8

Back on the Certificate Store panel, left-click Next.
Certificate Import - Certificate

9

1
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Author Comment

by:AndrewBruderer
Comment Utility
I like the adjustments Matt.  Thanks.  This was my first article.  I've been in the industry quite a while and figured I'd start posting some of the things I've found useful back to the community.

Again, thanks for the adjustments and the bonus points!

Andrew
0

A Step by Step Guide

Whether you are a Systems Administrator looking for a way to simulate your current environment for testing or upgrade purposes or a student who is looking to create a lab for study purposes the ability to simulate a network connection over a WAN link is something that used to be thrown into the too hard basket. However with the prevelance of virtual computing and software router solutions such as those available through VMWare and Vyatta this is now a scenario that is easy to implement with minimum cost.

The following tutorial is a step by step guide on how to setup a virtual WAN using VMWare and Vyatta however the steps can be easily modified for other Virtual hosting platforms.

The only prerequisites needed are a server with sufficent hardware specs to run ESX or ESXi version 3i through 4i. and enough storage space to hold the Virtual Machines. This tutorial also assumes you have installed your version of ESX onto the host and are ready to create the Virtual infrastucture.

Scenario

The scenario in this tutorial is a network consisting of a main site and 2 regional sites connected over a WAN. The main site is called London and the 2 regional sites are called Sydney and Tokyo.

Step 1 Virtual Switches

Create a virtual Switch for each site with no bindings to the hosts adapter we will let ESX handle all the networking internally. This is done by doing the following from Virtual Centre Manager (steps may differ …
4

Expert Comment

by:MSS_IT
Comment Utility
I'm attempting to use Vyatta to set up an isolated test environment in ESXi 5.1. I still want to allow clients to have http/https traffic through the production environment for updates, etc. Do you have any information on how to configure Vyatta for this setup?
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How to install VMware ESX 4 Update 1 trough PXE boot

Installing ESX 4 is an easy task but it could be easier, if you need to install more than 1 server this would be a fast way without making mistakes (you can make during manual installation).

Requirements:
VMware workstation or VMware player
VMware appliance EDA      
VMware ESX ISO file

1. Install EDA.

Step 1. Download the VMware appliance EDA
Link: http://www.vmware.com/appliances/directory/va/89313/download

Step 2. Import the EDA .ovf file in VMware workstation or the VMware player.

Step 3. Add a CD-ROM player to the virtual machine and mount the ESX ISO file to the machine.

Step 4. Start the appliance and follow the on-screen instructions
a. Click on reconfigure to edit the network settings
EDA Screenshot
b. Fill in you information and click on OK to save the settings.
 EDA Screenshot 2
Step 5. Now you can logon to the EDA to configure the boot options
Open Internet explorer and go to they site (your given IP address) in this example this would be http://10.10.100.25
Login with root - root

2. Configure EDA.

Settings for a successful deployment of ESX on multiple serversStep 1. setting up the default settings
a. General ESX Host Settings: you must fill all you settings here, the license server is not necessary for ESX 4, this can be done by the host itself later on of by the vCenter …
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VMware is virtual machine software that provides a virtualized set of hardware (a video adapter, a network adapter, and hard disk adapters) to the guest operating system. VMware virtual machines become highly portable between computers, because every host looks nearly identical to the guest. In practice, a system administrator can pause operations on a virtual machine guest, move or copy that guest to another physical computer, and there resume execution exactly at the point of suspension. VMware's enterprise software hypervisors for servers, VMware ESX and VMware ESXi are bare-metal embedded Hypervisors that run directly on server hardware without requiring an additional underlying operating system.