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Web browsers are applications used primarily to display documents, files and media from the Internet, identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) that can be a page, image, video or other file. Some browsers require the use of add-ons or extensions to safely render the information they receive; others have systems built into them to perform the same functions.

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LOW COST BULK SMS PROVIDERS FOR NONPROFITS
Now if you are running a nonprofit outfit, then ask for donations by sending your donors' text messages.
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Cloud Class® Course: CompTIA Cloud+
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Cloud Class® Course: CompTIA Cloud+

The CompTIA Cloud+ Basic training course will teach you about cloud concepts and models, data storage, networking, and network infrastructure.

Password Managers
This is the conclusion of the review and tests for using two or more Password Managers so you don't need to rely on just one. This article describes the results of a lot of testing in different scenario's to reveal which ones best co-exist together. Enjoy...
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Password-Managers
Each password manager has its own problems in dealing with certain websites and their login methods. In Part 1, I review the Top 5 Password Managers that I've found to be the best. In Part 2 we'll look at which ones co-exist together and why it's often useful to use more than one.
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Expert Comment

by:Jorge Carretero
Comment Utility
Great Article !!!!

But when it comes to Security i think Linux is the king, so i recommend this solutions.-
https://www.lastpass.com/es
LastPass supports also Linux and has better security, if you are too paranoic the second option.-
https://keepass.info/
May be your solution, but its harder to configure and maintain, in the past i only used Firefox master password, so maybe my advice is not so good.
Good Luck.
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Comment Utility
Hi Jorge and thank you for your comments about my article.

The problem with your recommendation about lastpass is that it's owned by LogMeIn - a company I will now be avoiding like the plague because of the way they treated both their paying and nonpaying customers recently in just dropping the Xmarks bookmarks manager like a hot potato.

To see what I'm talking about, see the thread still getting comments here:

https://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/29092048/Alternatives-to-the-Xmarks-com-Bookmarks-Synchronization-Service.html

You're welcome (in fact encouraged) to contribute your thoughts to the above thread.

I didn't much like Lastpass as a solution before, but after what LogMeIn recently did after taking over Xmarks, I would no longer consider any solution that they have any control over -  and that's coming from someone who used their LogMeIn Rescue product at a cost of about $1,000 a year for nearly 10 years.

Their killing of a solution that so many were enjoying (and subscribing to use Pro features for) without any decent explanation is bound to hurt them in the long run imo and I'll discourage anyone who asks about any LogMeIn solution in the future for that reason.

Avoid using LastPass - who know's when it will just disappear, just like Xmarks did, when logmein decides they don't want to play anymore?!

Cheers...

Andrew
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Gdpr
Following on from our article on "The Murky World of Consent and opt in", we thought we would issue some helpful guidance, not only on consent itself but knowing what information you are capturing, what you are doing with this data and how you can prove the lifecycle of this data when it comes to a
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When you put your credit card number into a website for an online transaction, surely you know to look for signs of a secure website such as the padlock icon in the web browser or the green address bar.  This is one way to protect yourself from others breaking into your data. Google, Mozilla, and other major browsers are on a mission to make insecure HTTP a thing of the past. Google has made HTTPS (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure) and website loading speeds major ranking factors.  HTTPS uses a connection encrypted by transport-layer security to protect transmitted data from eavesdropping. Most browsers like Firefox and Chrome now prominently show ‘Not Secure’ warnings in the address bar and warnings also appear directly below form fields on pages using HTTP. These changes show that HTTPS is now a necessity for all sites, because of its privacy and security benefits.


Businesses depend upon SSL certificates to encrypt data and authenticate both internal and external systems and applications to ensure appropriate access. By having websites and endpoints on the Web configured with a SSL certificate, users are assured that the endpoint has been authenticated and any communication with these sites over the HTTPS protocol is encrypted. Complete encryption of data transfer with Secure Socket Layer certificates (SSL certificates) is quickly becoming the norm throughout the Internet.


The Need For Automated SSL Encryption


SSL certificates are used not just for browser-based security but also for secure server-to-server communication for applications and data exchange. The implementation of SSL certificates is rarely automated which means trying to recall special commands, going over steps to renew and deploy a certificate and then tackling complicated installation processes, which can be tricky even for experienced website administrators. The consequences of improperly configured or expired certificate can be disastrous for an organization amounting to financial losses, fines for non-compliance, and lower productivity.


All SSL digital certificates have a lifecycle anywhere between one and three years and upon expiration are not considered valid. SSL certificates need to be renewed at the end of their life to avoid outages, service disruption, and security concerns. Sometimes certificates may also need to be replaced earlier (e.g., bugs, end-of-life of SHA-1 hashing, change in company policy). Keeping certificates up to date, especially when maintaining a multitude of servers can be really annoying. Moving to an automated SSL certificate lifecycle processes takes out the need to rely on manual processes; it takes the guesswork out to improve efficiency and reduce security risks for your business. cPanel addresses the pain point of SSL installation and renewal through the AutoSSL feature.


Fully Automated SSL Encryption With AutoSSL


cPanel, Inc., has recently added a feature called AutoSSL (automated SSL) to automatically provision, issue, configure and install validated SSL certificates to its web hosting partners’ websites. Automated SSL also enables SSL on admin-based logins, email and internally running services in cPanel. AutoSSL is now available to all cPanel web hosting accounts and those running WHM version 60 or later. It is possible to view the logs for AutoSSL right from the WHM interface. AutoSSL automatically includes corresponding www. domains for each domain and subdomain in the certificate. But AutoSSL only includes domains and subdomains that pass a Domain Control Validation (DCV) test as proof of ownership of the domain.


Take The Hard Work Out With Automated SSL Encryption


With AutoSSL enabled, there is no need to fill out lengthy forms and no more having to manually copy certificates into place.  Your websites are automatically secured and encrypted with free Domain Validated SSL certificate and your coverage never lapses. A cronjob handles the request, download, and installation of new SSL certificates around expiration time for all of your hosted domains.


Secure Your Website With Automated SSL Encryption


Users will enjoy a more streamlined experience, with fully automatic issuance, renewal, validation, and setup of SSL certificates for all websites, logins, and endpoints on the server. An automated SSL encryption system eliminates common human errors in the process, which may be caused by the system admin or anyone installing the certificate. Automated SSL encryption improves the privacy, security, and trust of websites for the end users because there will be no lapse in a valid certificate.

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Fonts
Ever visit a website where you spotted a really cool looking Font, yet couldn't figure out which font family it belonged to, or how to get a copy of it for your own use? This article explains the process of doing exactly that, as well as showing how to install downloaded fonts.
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Expert Comment

by:Brian B
Comment Utility
That is a really useful article, Andrew. Thanks for sharing.

A question though, back in the "old days" by my standards, you weren't supposed to share fonts because many of them were sold separately and were considered to be under the software license of the product they worked with. I would assume if you can get the font from Google that it is safe, but are there still instances of those IP fonts today that aren't supposed to be shared?
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Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Comment Utility
Hi Brian,

An excellent observation. With regards to safety of available fonts, I can only assume that all submissions are checked by Google in this respect before a listing is accepted, so while never beyond the realms of possibility, am confident that a malicious font download is unlikely.

I'm sure there are many fonts to be found on the web which are not supposed to be shared as you've rightly pointed out, however with every font downloaded from the Google Fonts site, there is also a license agreement included within the downloaded Zip file that specifies which usage license the font has been released under.

In the case of the illustrated "Lato" font used in my example, that particular font has been released under the Sil Open Font License (OFL) and comes with the following conditions when downloaded.
PERMISSION & CONDITIONS
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of the Font Software, to use, study, copy, merge, embed, modify, redistribute, and sell modified and unmodified copies of the Font Software, subject to the following conditions,
The list of exclusions are as one would expect for most open source material, such as preventing the sale of the font by itself etc, however for personal or commercial use within other products, there's no problem.  This could differ of course with each font that's made available so it always pays to check what rights are provided. Font families not available on Google Fonts and found on other font distribution sites would of course contain their own rules and restrictions, which should always be respected.

I hope that answers your questions and thank you for your feedback and up-vote. I very much appreciate it. Regards, Andrew
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EE Question ID
In threads here at EE, each comment has a unique Identifier (ID). It is easy to get the full path for an ID via the right-click context menu. However, we often want to post a short link within a thread rather than the full link. This article shows a technique for doing this with a single keystroke.
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Comment Utility
Thank you for the clarification Joe.
I'm glad that you were able to understand my examples.
It's actually quite an accomplishment on you part! I guess you could say I'm "programmatically challenged". Whenever I try to understand sample code, all those commands and squiggly } lines start to make the whole page go blurry on me lol..  Your comments beside the commands make it very easy to follow indeed.  Will definitely be checking out your other AutoHotkey articles so thanks for the links.

Best..
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVE
Comment Utility
Andrew,
Thanks again for the comments. It's extremely helpful for authors to get feedback like that from readers. Regards, Joe
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If you are a web developer, you would be aware of the <iframe> tag in HTML. The <iframe> stands for inline frame and is used to embed another document within the current HTML document. The embedded document could be even another website.
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Homepage
Before we dive into the marketing strategies involved with creating an effective homepage, it’s crucial that EE members know what a homepage is. In essence, a homepage is the introductory, or default page, of a website that typically highlights the site’s table of contents.
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Superb Internet Corp - SSL Certificates
SSL stands for “Secure Sockets Layer” and an SSL certificate is a critical component to keeping your website safe, secured, and compliant.
Any ecommerce website must have an SSL certificate to ensure the safe handling of sensitive information like a customer’s personal and credit card information.
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Cloud Class® Course: Certified Penetration Testing
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Cloud Class® Course: Certified Penetration Testing

This CPTE Certified Penetration Testing Engineer course covers everything you need to know about becoming a Certified Penetration Testing Engineer. Career Path: Professional roles include Ethical Hackers, Security Consultants, System Administrators, and Chief Security Officers.

Today, still in the boom of Apple, PC's and products, nearly 50% of the computer users use Windows as graphical operating systems. If you are among those users who love windows, but are grappling to keep the system's hard drive optimized, then you should read this article.
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This article offers some helpful and general tips for safe browsing and online shopping. It offers simple and manageable procedures that help to ensure the safety of one's personal information and the security of any devices.
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Expert Comment

by:Loganathan Natarajan
Comment Utility
What about storing cpanel, or important logins to re-login often? shall we store it in the browser?
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Author Comment

by:Kiefer Dunham
Comment Utility
Hi Loganathan. I very much enjoy the convenience of storing my usernames and passwords in my browser for several of the websites that I frequently visit. Most of the time this practice is very acceptable and carries little risk of a breach in the security of your personal information. However, I would not recommend doing so if you share any of your devices with others. In the end, it is really at the user's discretion. If you save all of your usernames and passwords to a browser account such as those offered by say Google Chrome, then all that a hacker has to do is find out that one username and password to have instant access to all your other accounts. There is an old saying. "Don't put all your eggs in one basket." I believe it applies here. There is always some risk. Though, the risk is minimal in this circumstance. I hope this helps.
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#Citrix #Internet Explorer #Enterprise Mode #IE 11 #IE 8
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Author Comment

by:Brian Murphy
Comment Utility
Awesome.  I'm making some progress it seems.
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Several part series to implement Internet Explorer 11 Enterprise Mode
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Citrix XenApp, Internet Explorer 11 set to Enterprise Mode and using central hosted sites.xml file.
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Publications banner
I annotated my article on ransomware somewhat extensively, but I keep adding new references and wanted to put a link to the reference library.  Despite all the reference tools I have on hand, it was not easy to find a way to do this easily. I finally found a way that suited my needs.
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by:William Nettmann
Comment Utility
I learned something from the article|blog post|diary entry no matter how it is categorised or what you call it. I am not academically trained, and this may have just opened up a new world for (to?) me.

Thanks!
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Author Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
Comment Utility
William,

You are welcome. I wanted to somehow share my experience so that others could go right to the solution,  instead of having to plod through the same process.
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My Dock
Do you come here a lot? Are you lazy like me and don't want to go through the "trouble" of having to click your Dock's Safari icon and then having to click your Experts Exchange Favorites bookmark to get here? Well then this article is for you.
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Introduction
If you're like most people, you have occasionally made a typographical error when you're entering information into an online form.  And to your consternation, the browser remembers the error, and offers to autocomplete your future entries by using the typographical error.  This is somewhat annoying, and if you're paying attention, you can visually identify the error.  You can usually get past this issue by telling the browser to forget your recent history.  But have you ever begun typing your password or passphrase into an online form and thought, "Did I get that right?"  You can't visually check your work because the browser is showing you a form input field with something like this: ········· The browser is "helpfully" hiding the password from prying eyes by masking the input control field.

This article teaches three ways to allow your clients to show or hide the password fields as they type them into your forms.  In my experience, the default behavior that hides the password input is only marginally useful.  Most of the time nobody is looking over your shoulder and the real risk of lost passwords does not rest with the human client or the client browser, but with the servers where passwords are stored.  We can't change the server's security, but we can choose to make life easier for our (human) clients!

How HTML <input type="password"> Works
HTML defines several different input types for different kinds of input controls
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You have seen this as an option on your internet browser before or it may be completely new to you. But what does this mean and why would I use this?
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Free Tool: IP Lookup
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Free Tool: IP Lookup

Get more info about an IP address or domain name, such as organization, abuse contacts and geolocation.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

When I'm searching for answers on Experts Exchange, I often use Google because it's built into my browser.  To search only on Experts Exchange, I use the "site:" search operator, which can be cumbersome to type out each time I want to run a search. Fortunately, I have found an automated  workaround that streamlines the process.


It involves setting up a simple browser shortcut (for Chrome and Firefox), that you can implement in less than a minute, allowing you to search experts-exchange.com with Google by typing "ee" (instead of a site operator) before your search query in the browser address bar.  In this article, I will detail how to set up this shortcut for yourself.


Adding an Experts Exchange site search to the Chrome browser

The process for Chrome is to add a new search engine to the browser (video instructions here):


  1. In chrome, via your address bar go to chrome://settings/searchEngines
  2. Scroll to the bottom and "Add a new search engine" with the following values:
  3. Press Enter and exit out of your settings area.

chrome-setup.png 



Adding an Experts Exchange site search to the Firefox browser

The process for Firefox is to add a dynamic bookmark to the browser (video instructions here):

 

  1. Press 'Ctrl + Shft + B' (Windows) or 'Apple Key + B' (Mac) in Firefox to launch the Bookmark Menu
  2. In the Bookmark Library, right click on "Bookmarks Menu"
  3. Select "New Bookmark"
  4. Fill out the new bookmark with the following fields:
    • Name: Search Experts Exchange
      • (This name can be anything you want)
    • Location: https://www.google.com/#q=%s+site:experts-exchange.com
      • Site search URL with "%s" acting as a dynamically replaceable keyword
    • Keyword: ee
      • (This keyword will be what triggers the custom search)
  5. Click "Add"

firefox-bookmark.PNG 

Internet Explorer - Add Search Provider

The process for adding new Search Providers to Internet Explorer is currently broken (as of 4/14/2015). When IE is updated, I will update this article with the instructions.

 

Using Your New Search Tool

Once you've completed the setup, it's very simple to search Experts Exchange now with Google. All you have to do is:


  1. Type "ee" in your browser's address bar
  2. Type your search query after the "ee" 
  3. Press Enter

You will now only see results from experts-exchange.com


There you have it -- searching just Experts Exchange should be a much faster process. If you have any followup questions, post them as comments below.


For extensive details on this functionality including overviews on search operators and smart keywords you can read  my more detailed article here




 

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Expert Comment

by:Maidine Fouad
Comment Utility
Nifty ^^ !
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Comment Utility
Excellent tip! Thanks for sharing.
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In Q3 of last year, Experts Exchange introduced a new Messaging System, allowing any member to communicate directly with other members.

During an especially long thread with a member, I wanted to go back to previous messages in the exchange to refresh my memory on an issue. However, the Message System doesn't have a Search function that allows you to search the contents of all messages in a thread. But then it occurred to me that I could take advantage of the search feature in my browser, Firefox (Edit>Find or Ctrl-F). However, to do that, all of the messages would have to be expanded by clicking the plus sign next to each one:
Plus-sign---Expand.jpgThat's very painful in a long thread! So I submitted an enhancement request entitled Need the ability to expand/collapse all messages in a thread  in the Messaging System testing project. An EE Administrator, eenookami, replied to my request with a fantastic work-around — JavaScript code to expand all messages in a thread, as well as JavaScript code to collapse all of them.

In the spirit of giving credit where credit is due, all of the credit goes to eenookami for this solution. My only minor contributions are taking the time to write the article in order to share the solution with other members of the EE community and adding an explanation of how to place the Expand All and Collapse All items on the Firefox Bookmarks Toolbar
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:Rob Jurd
Comment Utility
Great Article Joe and thanks for giving me kudos however no one would know about it without taking it a step further with this article contribution.

For those interested, it is called a bookmarklet and it will work it all browsers.  For those adventurous ones, you can write your own bookmarklets to do anything on the site you would otherwise do with a click or a keypress on your keyboard.  I'll leave the examples for your imagination...

The bug report that started this is: http://support.experts-exchange.com/customer/portal/articles/1162518

Cheers,

eenookami
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVE
Comment Utility
Hi eenookami,

Thanks for the compliment and the Helpful Vote — I appreciate both! Additional thanks for the further explanation of bookmarklet — very interesting!

Btw, the link you posted for the bug report that started this does not seem to be right, but it gave me the idea to include that link in the article, which I will do in a moment. Regards, Joe
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Firefox seemed to slow down recently and it occurred to me that I had many open tabs — ultimately, I would find out that three-quarters of them were Experts Exchange tabs! :)

So I decided to go on a hunt for a tool that would capture the names and URLs of all open tabs and put them in a plain text file. That way I could close the tabs, thereby improving Firefox's performance, but still have a record of them in case I want to find one and resurrect it.

Enter the Send Tab URLs add-on:

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/send-tab-urls/

This Firefox add-on creates a list with the names and URLs of all open tabs in the current Firefox window. It has the ability to email the list or copy the list to the clipboard. I've never tried the email feature, as it (1) doesn't interest me and (2) is limited to 30 tabs. The copy-to-clipboard feature can handle an unlimited number of tabs — you'll see below why this is important to me. If anyone tries the email feature, please post a comment with your results.

I started using Send Tab URLs with Firefox 32.0.1 and am using it on the latest version as of this article's publication — 34.0.5. The website says that it supports English, Chinese (Simplified), Dutch, German, Hebrew, Italian, Korean, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), and Swedish, but I have used it only with the one language I know. If anyone tries it with a language besides English, please post a comment with your results.

After installing the add-on, …
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Expert Comment

by:FlyWithTheWind Marc
Comment Utility
This addon isn't compatible with the new version of Firefox :(
There is this other one that works just fine https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/export-tabs-urls-and-titles/
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVE
Comment Utility
Hi Marc,
Thanks for joining Experts Exchange today and reading my article. Yes, AE Creations said in their blog that Send Tab URLs is their least-used extension, and they have the data to back it up (copied here under "Fair Use"):
5,786 average daily users between July 2016 and July 2017, compared to 8,354 for Panic Button and 35,962 for Clippings.
Because of this, they also said that they've "decided to discontinue development of Send Tab URLs, and focus on Clippings and Panic Button."

I posted my comment at the blog in early January:
Seems that you have the hard data saying that Send Tab URLs is the least-used extension, but, for me, it's the only one from AE Creations that I use (never even heard of Clippings or Panic Button). I run Send Tab URLs often on many machines...even published an article about it that may interest you..."How to save the names and URLs of open Firefox tabs in a plain text file":


https://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/17495/

Of course, I'm extremely disappointed that you are discontinuing it. But I thank you for the more-than-a-year that I had with it, and for providing such an excellent tool at no cost. That said, I'd be happy to pay for it, and I suspect that many of your 5,000+ daily users would be, too. I urge you to reconsider your decision to discontinue it and, instead, rewrite it as a WebExtension for Firefox 57, perhaps even charging a fair price for it. Thanks, Joe

They haven't responded to my comment (or the comments from others), so it's safe to say that I did not persuade them to reconsider their decision to discontinue it.

Thank you for providing the link to the 57-compatible Export Tabs URLs by AL and letting us know that it works fine.

Welcome aboard to Experts Exchange! Regards, Joe
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Some time a go I wrote an article about downgrading your installation of IE 9 to IE 8 in windows 7 x64 (http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Internet_Email/Web_Browsers/Internet_Explorer/A_9390-Downgrading-IE9-to-IE8-on-a-Windows-7-x64-box.html).  The reason behind the article was that we have many systems that needed an older version of IE in order to work, not to mention an older version of Java.  

Recently I went on vacation and when I got back all the systems I had set up not to update had updated to IE 11.  Noone was able to get into our mainframe systems that require an earlier version of IE, if they were using IE 11.  Luckily on some mission critical machines I had installed chrome with IETab, which simulates IE 7, 8, and 9.  But now my work was cut out for me.  I went about setting compatibility mode on all the computers with IE 11 on them and it worked like a charm!

Compatibility mode view is located by clicking the gear icon in the right hand corner of the screen in internet explorer.
Right hand top corner of Internet Explorer
Once you click on the gear icon, scroll down to Compatibility View Settings.  To add the website and it's subdomains that you are presently viewing, just click add site, otherwise the easiest way to add new sites is to navigate to the ones you want and follow the directions above.

This is much easier than downgrading your IE.  It also has the added benefit of letting you see other sites with the newest version of Internet Explorer.
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If you want to securely publish websites, web-based E-mail services, terminal server gateways, etc. for in-house users, an internal enterprise certificate authority is often an acceptable solution without the expense of purchasing a certificate from a commercial certificate authority.  (Another option is to use self-signed certificates.  This procedure can be applied to self-signed certificates, with a slight modification.)

The problem is that users that do not trust the internal certificate authority will see the security warning when they browse to the website.

Here's how to eliminate the warning:

1.      Browse to the site whose certificate or certificate authority you want to trust.
2.      When told "There is a problem with this website's security certificate.", choose "Continue to this website (not recommended)."
3.      Select Tools->Internet Options.
4.      Select Security->Trusted sites->Sites.
5.      Confirm the URL matches, and click "Add" then "Close".
6.      Close the "Internet Options" dialog box with either "OK" or "Cancel".
7.      Refresh the current page.
8.      When told "There is a problem with this website's security certificate.", choose "Continue to this website (not recommended)."
9.      Click on "Certificate Error" at the right of the address bar and select "View certificates".

(if it is a self-signed certificate, skip to step 13)

10.      Click the Certification Path tab
11.      Click the root CA
12.      Click View Certificate
13.      Click on "Install Certificate...", then in …
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LVL 75

Expert Comment

by:käµfm³d 👽
Comment Utility
I cannot see the entire conversation since moderator/PE comments are hidden, but based on your responses (which you might want to select "Private Comment" in the future!) I can imagine how the conversation was going.

I have to say that in my opinion this isn't very well written. Firstly, you introduce your article by talking about publishing websites and securing them with certificates. Then you talk about the steps a user needs to take to trust the certificate. The whole time you are using "you", though. Who is the intended audience of this article:  the website owner, or the user browsing the site? Your pronoun choice has blurred that. Secondly, outside of the introduction, this is really just a list of steps--a short one at that. This probably would have been better as a blog post rather than an article.

I acknowledge that you credited the original post, but quite frankly it still rather feels like you haven't added any value--just reposted the information. You did add three steps and a note denoting that one should skip the three steps if the certificate is self-signed, but the title of the post you credited explicitly says, "How to make IE8 trust a self-signed certificate..." Why should I believe your steps over those you credited? That is the kind of value I would expect to be added if you are reposting another's work, and that work is incorrect or incomplete. If you are just reposting for the sake of having an article under your belt, then IMO that is borderline (if not) plagiarism.

Not trying to rain on your parade; just trying to give honest feedback.
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Author Comment

by:asavener
Comment Utility
Please feel free to delete the article.
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Microsoft IE9 provides  very useful tools for web development! It makes the developer work easy! No need to install any plugin or add-on! It's built in to the IE9 browser.

How to invoke Developer Tools in IE9?

1. Press the function key - F12
 
                 OR

2.Go to Tools->F12 developer tools

IE Developer Tools
IE9 allows the developer to test website in different IE versions - IE8, IE7. To do that, select the Browser Mode menu and choose the appropriate IE version.  It reloads the webpage according to the IE version selected.

IE Developer Tools
It allows to validate the HTML and CSS of your website! It sends the information to the Validators in the W3C(World Wide Web Consortium). Go to Validate menu and select the respective option.

IE Developer Tools
One of the big head aches of web developers is to test the website in different resolutions/sizes! Microsoft IE9 has option to test in different resolutions. Go to Tools menu and select Resize and select the appropriate size!

IE Developer Tools
It also allows to test with custom resolution!

IE9 browser has got awesome option to pick the color in the webpage! Let us consider an example - You are browsing some sites. Suddenly you come across a website which has a beautiful font color and you wish to know the RGB color code. With IE9, you can do it instantly.

IE Developer Tools
Go to Tools menu and select Show color picker! It launches the Color Picker dialog, which allows to select the particular color and it shows the RGB value!

IE Developer Tools
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Expert Comment

by:macarrillo1
Comment Utility
I liked your article, it was easy to understand and covered a lot of the features I look for. I particularly liked the way you clearly illustrated and described each of these features. The only thing I would have liked to have seen is a short introduction mentioning that other browsers have or do not have similar capabilities.

As a result of reading your article, I think I am more likely to use this functionality instead of always depending on a full feature development tool.
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Author Comment

by:Roopesh Reddy
Comment Utility
Hi macarrillo1,

Glad you liked the article! Planning some more in the near feature :-)
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Web Browsers

39K

Solutions

38K

Contributors

Web browsers are applications used primarily to display documents, files and media from the Internet, identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) that can be a page, image, video or other file. Some browsers require the use of add-ons or extensions to safely render the information they receive; others have systems built into them to perform the same functions.