Web Browsers

40K

Solutions

38K

Contributors

Web browsers are applications used primarily to display documents, files and media from the Internet, identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) that can be a page, image, video or other file. Some browsers require the use of add-ons or extensions to safely render the information they receive; others have systems built into them to perform the same functions.

Share tech news, updates, or what's on your mind.

Sign up to Post

ArticlesVideosEE
This is my 100th publication at EE — 56 articles and 44 videos. To mark the occasion, I wrote a program to download the Title, Views, Endorsements, and Points for the specified URLs of articles and videos. Based on feedback, I enhanced the program to include number of Comments and Date Published.
3
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Ran this a few times and works exceptionally well. Great stuff Joe - very helpful indeed.

One feature suggestion for a possible future revision - include a column for "Date Published" - Possible? :)

Thanks for your work Joe - fantastic stuff.

Endorsed!

Edit: Oh and while I have your ear, how about a column for "Number of comments" too?  Sorry, you may have opened up a huge can of worms here. You know how I can get when I like one of your creations lol ;)
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Hi Andrew,

> works exceptionally well

Glad to hear it!

> Great stuff Joe - very helpful indeed.

Thanks for the positive feedback...I appreciate it.

> include a column for "Date Published"
> a column for "Number of comments"

Great ideas! Both already implemented. Will upload the enhanced version (and some updates to the article) as soon as my high-speed Internet service returns (connected via my mobile phone now...anything beyond these text comments would be painful).

> Endorsed!

Thanks for that! Regards, Joe
0
CompTIA Network+
LVL 19
CompTIA Network+

Prepare for the CompTIA Network+ exam by learning how to troubleshoot, configure, and manage both wired and wireless networks.

Start.Me Bookmarks Manager
This article is about an excellent bookmarks manager I've been using that I thought deserved some promotion to make more folks aware of its existence. Free to use and very useful indeed. Enjoy...
5
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:Brandon Lyon
This is a helpful article. One thing to remember is that keeping one (or more) Start.Me tabs open is going to consume significantly more memory than browser bookmarks.

I used to love XMarks but years ago I ditched it when I was getting synchronization and corruption issues on a daily basis. These days I just use the default browser sync in Chrome (though I'll be migrating to Firefox soon).
1
LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Brandon,

Thank you for your very kind comment and also for endorsing the article with a Thumbs Up. Both very much appreciated!

Regards, Andrew
0
Experts Exchange Feature Guide
The purpose of this article is to show the bundle of features available to you at Experts Exchange, and where to find them. I will be updating it whenever changes to the site are made, so bookmark it and keep referring back if you suddenly can't find something. Enjoy exploring and using the site!
10
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:Ugra Narayan Pandey
Very useful article and explain in detailed, each feature and their use.
Thanks for the Article, still learning new things in Expert-Exchange and this article help me lots!
2
LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
You're very welcome Ugra, I've very glad you've found it useful.  And thank you for endorsing the article by clicking the Thumbs Up icon - very much appreciated.

Regards, Andrew
1
Recent PCI standards require that TLS 1.0 no longer be used to secure data communications. PCI standards ensure that customer payment details are secure. This article will help to disable TLS 1.0 and enable newer versions that meet PCI standards and website compatibility.
5
Fix Google Chrome Issues
I see people having issues with the Chrome browser so often that I decided to write this article on how to definitively determine problems you may be encountering with Google Chrome. I hope it helps you out...
6

Expert Comment

by:Basem Khawaja
Excellent article. Very easy to use and very useful. Thank you Andrew.
0
LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Thank you for your feedback and for endorsing the article with a thumbs up Basem. I'm pleased you found it helpful :)
0
FoxyTab
This article shows how to save the names and URLs of open Firefox tabs in a plain text file with FoxyTab, a Featured Extension. I tested it in the latest Firefox Quantum release (61.0.1 on this article's publication date), both 32-bit and 64-bit, and in Windows 7, 8.1, and 10 — all worked perfectly.
1
Secure HTTPS
HTTPS is an essential technology and the Chrome browser developed by Google now shows “Secure” in the address bar when you visit a page with the HTTPS protocol such as https://www.experts-exchange.com but what does this mean? Is the website secure from malware? Is our identity secure?
0
Password Managers
This is the conclusion of the review and tests for using two or more Password Managers so you don't need to rely on just one. This article describes the results of a lot of testing in different scenario's to reveal which ones best co-exist together. Enjoy...
2

Expert Comment

by:Otto Didact
Thank you, Andrew Leniart;

Parts 1 & 2 of both of these articles were excellent.  

I actually like the idea of being able to carry around or safely stash a flashdrive as a alternate vault for passwords.  Being able to plug a USB stick into Laptop`s USB port & gain access through whatever gateways, even without WiFi, Bluetooth, Ethernet cables, &/or cell service & unlimited data minutes for an Internet connection seems like a beneficial advantage to me.  I as yet have never used a password manager, though have been following reviews their use for several years now, but then have usually felt they fell short of being applicable to how I & my wife would use them.  I especially like your innovation in deciding to redundantly use two password managers together.  

I think your article was the first time that any reviewer mentioned being able to print or save all of one`s passwords as a PDF, though for the purpose of keeping it with my passport doesn`t seem like a good idea, but in a safe deposit box, or in an other such safe place does.  And so does saving it to a USB thumbdrive, to then be placed in a safe place or carried on one`s person as necessary.  Saving a copy to the cloud, where an operational version of one`s password manager exists at one`s beck & call, & for syncing different devices & browsers, seems unnecessary.  

I am still a bit consternated by them not working with Microsoft Edge (is this the fault of the password manager industry or that of Microsoft), & with them not being able to figure out how to autofill or sign in on some login situations.  The latter especially sounds like someone needs to assign some set of universal criteria for login methodology, for both the password managers & the password  requiring gateways to adhere to in order to operate efficiently together, for the sake & necessity of the users of password managers, & of the sites & applications that rightly require security precautions.
2
LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Otto,

Parts 1 & 2 of both of these articles were excellent.

Firstly, welcome to Experts Exchange and thank you for reading my articles and especially for your kind comment! I'd be grateful if you could take a moment to endorse the articles by clicking the thumbs-up icon right underneath the end of them :)

I actually like the idea of being able to carry around or safely stash a flashdrive as a alternate vault for passwords.  Being able to plug a USB stick into Laptop`s USB port & gain access through whatever gateways, even without WiFi, Bluetooth, Ethernet cables, &/or cell service & unlimited data minutes for an Internet connection seems like a beneficial advantage to me.

You're not the only one. Others have expressed the same desire, yet the password developers seem to continue heading in the direction of making your vault fully available to you in a browser on their website instead. RoboForm is a typical example that moved away and dropped support for exactly what you prefer doing. I see that as a huge responsibility on the developers part, so it's important to consider who you are going to trust with the storage of such sensitive information.

That said, the only way I can see of influencing password manager developers is to continue showing them there is still a need for this type of technology and function. Keep giving them feedback - if they get enough of it, they may just start to listen.

I as yet have never used a password manager, though have been following reviews their use for several years now, but then have usually felt they fell short of being applicable to how I & my wife would use them.

You make an interesting comment. Obviously, I'm one of those that always recommends the use of Password managers. In my field of work, far too often I see people using the same password on multiple websites (and confess I've been guilty of that myself at times) and still frequently see real-life examples of sensitive password information being stuck to monitors via sticky notes, in totally unsecured spreadsheets or on a piece of paper laying on a desk or in a drawer. I'm not just talking about your average home user here either. I support many Accounting and Legal Firms who I've still noticed doing things like that. Basic human nature tendencies kick in, regardless of educational and professional achievement levels.

Everyone has unique requirements, so I'd be genuinely interested to hear "how" the variety of password managers fell short for your particular circumstances?

I especially like your innovation in deciding to redundantly use two password managers together.

Thank you so much. I've actually been doing that for years because I could never find a single solution that wouldn't break for me under one circumstance or another when a website changed its login steps. The use of two solved that, but the trick was finding two that could work together in harmony and not constantly fight one another for control of logging me into the websites I was visiting, or password protected applications on my computer. Currently, Roboform and Avast play very well together, but if I had to make a choice between the two, then I would probably keep the Avast solution. Despite the lack of features that Roboform offers, it seems to handle changed login pages far more effortlessly.

I think your article was the first time that any reviewer mentioned being able to print or save all of one`s passwords as a PDF, though for the purpose of keeping it with my passport doesn`t seem like a good idea, but in a safe deposit box, or in an other such safe place does.

Indeed, and you make an excellent observation that I perhaps should have clarified on a bit more. I would certainly never encourage people to save to PDF or even print out their passwords, but there have been times when that's helped folks out of a  jam. The capability is actually there in just about every password application I've tried, but I don't tend to encourage its use except under specific scenarios that a client may explain to me that they have.

And so does saving it to a USB thumbdrive, to then be placed in a safe place or carried on one`s person as necessary.

I do hope you have that USB thumb drive encrypted with a nice strong password in the event you ever lost it though? :)

Saving a copy to the cloud, where an operational version of one`s password manager exists at one`s beck & call, & for syncing different devices & browsers, seems unnecessary.

This again falls back to personal requirements and circumstances I think. For me, the option is invaluable, because I have a couple of laptops that I use when I travel, sometimes need to access my bank using my phone, or a website on an Ipad when showing a demo of a proposed solution to a client. Everything is available to me, all the time. But in order to have that luxury, I must trust that both Roboform and Avast will keep all my information secure - per my earlier statement.

In circumstances where such functionality isn't needed, such as perhaps yours, there is no need to use it just because it's available. There are functions in my Password managers that I simply ignore because I have no use for them. In fact, if "you" don't need cloud access to synchronize different devices and browsers, then you are in a somewhat enviable position of taking advantage of the freely available versions of those tools, where Cloud Synchronization is often offered as a "paid" feature.

I am still a bit consternated by them not working with Microsoft Edge (is this the fault of the password manager industry or that of Microsoft), & with them not being able to figure out how to autofill or sign in on some login situations.

A combination of both is my understanding. To have an application available as a plug into Microsoft Edge, it has to be vetted and approved by Microsoft first. How much work and/or expense this involves on the part of the developers I couldn't guess. But I am confident in one thing - from the feedback I received from all the password manager developers that were included in this review, all will at some point be updated to support Microsoft Edge. They will be forced to as the popularity of Microsoft's latest browser grows, if they want to retain their current userbase, subscribers and gain new ones over other competitive offerings.

The latter especially sounds like someone needs to assign some set of universal criteria for login methodology, for both the password managers & the password  requiring gateways to adhere to in order to operate efficiently together, for the sake & necessity of the users of password managers, & of the sites & applications that rightly require security precautions.

I don't believe it's so much as how to fill in the required information or security precautions, which would be a given. It's more about getting their application approved as a plug-in for Microsoft Edge, and subsequently even approved to be available on the Microsoft Store, strongly promoted in Windows 10. Again, this falls into how much effort is required to get past that vetting process. As I'm not a developer, that's something I'm not very familiar with.

My thanks for all of your feedback and comments Otto!

Regards, Andrew
0
Password-Managers
Each password manager has its own problems in dealing with certain websites and their login methods. In Part 1, I review the Top 5 Password Managers that I've found to be the best. In Part 2 we'll look at which ones co-exist together and why it's often useful to use more than one.
12
LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Bernhard,

Thanks for your comments. 2FA is an important consideration for many, an unnecessary nuisance for others, and then you have the camp that believes it should be forced (or at least made as an available option) everywhere as standard practice :)

For my own part, if 2FA is an option, I'll always enable and use it, but that's not always so. My bank as an example doesn't have the option available to me to just log into my account - opting instead to only force 2FA on money transfers to accounts that have not been transferred to before. I could give dozens of other examples that don't make much sense to "me" personally.

At the end of the day, everyone must reach their own conclusions and decide on what's best for them.

Regards, Andrew
1
LVL 33

Expert Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
Bernhard has an excellent point.  I love Sticky Password, but how does it know it is you if it doesn't store the credential you are logging in with?  I am actually in the midst of a tech support triage with SP and intend to ask the very question.

And by the way SP does have 2FA.
0
Gdpr
Following on from our article on "The Murky World of Consent and opt in", we thought we would issue some helpful guidance, not only on consent itself but knowing what information you are capturing, what you are doing with this data and how you can prove the lifecycle of this data when it comes to a
0
PMI ACP® Project Management
LVL 19
PMI ACP® Project Management

Prepare for the PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)® exam, which formally recognizes your knowledge of agile principles and your skill with agile techniques.

When you put your credit card number into a website for an online transaction, surely you know to look for signs of a secure website such as the padlock icon in the web browser or the green address bar.  This is one way to protect yourself from others breaking into your data. Google, Mozilla, and other major browsers are on a mission to make insecure HTTP a thing of the past. Google has made HTTPS (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure) and website loading speeds major ranking factors.  HTTPS uses a connection encrypted by transport-layer security to protect transmitted data from eavesdropping. Most browsers like Firefox and Chrome now prominently show ‘Not Secure’ warnings in the address bar and warnings also appear directly below form fields on pages using HTTP. These changes show that HTTPS is now a necessity for all sites, because of its privacy and security benefits.


Businesses depend upon SSL certificates to encrypt data and authenticate both internal and external systems and applications to ensure appropriate access. By having websites and endpoints on the Web configured with a SSL certificate, users are assured that the endpoint has been authenticated and any communication with these sites over the HTTPS protocol is encrypted. Complete encryption of data transfer with Secure Socket Layer certificates (SSL certificates) is quickly becoming the norm throughout the Internet.


The Need For Automated SSL Encryption


SSL certificates are used not just for browser-based security but also for secure server-to-server communication for applications and data exchange. The implementation of SSL certificates is rarely automated which means trying to recall special commands, going over steps to renew and deploy a certificate and then tackling complicated installation processes, which can be tricky even for experienced website administrators. The consequences of improperly configured or expired certificate can be disastrous for an organization amounting to financial losses, fines for non-compliance, and lower productivity.


All SSL digital certificates have a lifecycle anywhere between one and three years and upon expiration are not considered valid. SSL certificates need to be renewed at the end of their life to avoid outages, service disruption, and security concerns. Sometimes certificates may also need to be replaced earlier (e.g., bugs, end-of-life of SHA-1 hashing, change in company policy). Keeping certificates up to date, especially when maintaining a multitude of servers can be really annoying. Moving to an automated SSL certificate lifecycle processes takes out the need to rely on manual processes; it takes the guesswork out to improve efficiency and reduce security risks for your business. cPanel addresses the pain point of SSL installation and renewal through the AutoSSL feature.


Fully Automated SSL Encryption With AutoSSL


cPanel, Inc., has recently added a feature called AutoSSL (automated SSL) to automatically provision, issue, configure and install validated SSL certificates to its web hosting partners’ websites. Automated SSL also enables SSL on admin-based logins, email and internally running services in cPanel. AutoSSL is now available to all cPanel web hosting accounts and those running WHM version 60 or later. It is possible to view the logs for AutoSSL right from the WHM interface. AutoSSL automatically includes corresponding www. domains for each domain and subdomain in the certificate. But AutoSSL only includes domains and subdomains that pass a Domain Control Validation (DCV) test as proof of ownership of the domain.


Take The Hard Work Out With Automated SSL Encryption


With AutoSSL enabled, there is no need to fill out lengthy forms and no more having to manually copy certificates into place.  Your websites are automatically secured and encrypted with free Domain Validated SSL certificate and your coverage never lapses. A cronjob handles the request, download, and installation of new SSL certificates around expiration time for all of your hosted domains.


Secure Your Website With Automated SSL Encryption


Users will enjoy a more streamlined experience, with fully automatic issuance, renewal, validation, and setup of SSL certificates for all websites, logins, and endpoints on the server. An automated SSL encryption system eliminates common human errors in the process, which may be caused by the system admin or anyone installing the certificate. Automated SSL encryption improves the privacy, security, and trust of websites for the end users because there will be no lapse in a valid certificate.

0
Fonts
Ever visit a website where you spotted a really cool looking Font, yet couldn't figure out which font family it belonged to, or how to get a copy of it for your own use? This article explains the process of doing exactly that, as well as showing how to install downloaded fonts.
8
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:Brian B
That is a really useful article, Andrew. Thanks for sharing.

A question though, back in the "old days" by my standards, you weren't supposed to share fonts because many of them were sold separately and were considered to be under the software license of the product they worked with. I would assume if you can get the font from Google that it is safe, but are there still instances of those IP fonts today that aren't supposed to be shared?
0
LVL 29

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Brian,

An excellent observation. With regards to safety of available fonts, I can only assume that all submissions are checked by Google in this respect before a listing is accepted, so while never beyond the realms of possibility, am confident that a malicious font download is unlikely.

I'm sure there are many fonts to be found on the web which are not supposed to be shared as you've rightly pointed out, however with every font downloaded from the Google Fonts site, there is also a license agreement included within the downloaded Zip file that specifies which usage license the font has been released under.

In the case of the illustrated "Lato" font used in my example, that particular font has been released under the Sil Open Font License (OFL) and comes with the following conditions when downloaded.
PERMISSION & CONDITIONS
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of the Font Software, to use, study, copy, merge, embed, modify, redistribute, and sell modified and unmodified copies of the Font Software, subject to the following conditions,
The list of exclusions are as one would expect for most open source material, such as preventing the sale of the font by itself etc, however for personal or commercial use within other products, there's no problem.  This could differ of course with each font that's made available so it always pays to check what rights are provided. Font families not available on Google Fonts and found on other font distribution sites would of course contain their own rules and restrictions, which should always be respected.

I hope that answers your questions and thank you for your feedback and up-vote. I very much appreciate it. Regards, Andrew
2
EE Question ID
In threads here at EE, each comment has a unique Identifier (ID). It is easy to get the full path for an ID via the right-click context menu. However, we often want to post a short link within a thread rather than the full link. This article shows a technique for doing this with a single keystroke.
5
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Thank you for the clarification Joe.
I'm glad that you were able to understand my examples.
It's actually quite an accomplishment on you part! I guess you could say I'm "programmatically challenged". Whenever I try to understand sample code, all those commands and squiggly } lines start to make the whole page go blurry on me lol..  Your comments beside the commands make it very easy to follow indeed.  Will definitely be checking out your other AutoHotkey articles so thanks for the links.

Best..
0
LVL 67

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd
Andrew,
Thanks again for the comments. It's extremely helpful for authors to get feedback like that from readers. Regards, Joe
0
If you are a web developer, you would be aware of the <iframe> tag in HTML. The <iframe> stands for inline frame and is used to embed another document within the current HTML document. The embedded document could be even another website.
0
Homepage
Before we dive into the marketing strategies involved with creating an effective homepage, it’s crucial that EE members know what a homepage is. In essence, a homepage is the introductory, or default page, of a website that typically highlights the site’s table of contents.
1
Superb Internet Corp - SSL Certificates
SSL stands for “Secure Sockets Layer” and an SSL certificate is a critical component to keeping your website safe, secured, and compliant.
Any ecommerce website must have an SSL certificate to ensure the safe handling of sensitive information like a customer’s personal and credit card information.
1
Today, still in the boom of Apple, PC's and products, nearly 50% of the computer users use Windows as graphical operating systems. If you are among those users who love windows, but are grappling to keep the system's hard drive optimized, then you should read this article.
3
This article offers some helpful and general tips for safe browsing and online shopping. It offers simple and manageable procedures that help to ensure the safety of one's personal information and the security of any devices.
2
LVL 36

Expert Comment

by:Loganathan Natarajan
What about storing cpanel, or important logins to re-login often? shall we store it in the browser?
0
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Kiefer Dunham
Hi Loganathan. I very much enjoy the convenience of storing my usernames and passwords in my browser for several of the websites that I frequently visit. Most of the time this practice is very acceptable and carries little risk of a breach in the security of your personal information. However, I would not recommend doing so if you share any of your devices with others. In the end, it is really at the user's discretion. If you save all of your usernames and passwords to a browser account such as those offered by say Google Chrome, then all that a hacker has to do is find out that one username and password to have instant access to all your other accounts. There is an old saying. "Don't put all your eggs in one basket." I believe it applies here. There is always some risk. Though, the risk is minimal in this circumstance. I hope this helps.
0
#Citrix #Internet Explorer #Enterprise Mode #IE 11 #IE 8
2
LVL 16

Author Comment

by:Brian Murphy
Awesome.  I'm making some progress it seems.
0
Exploring ASP.NET Core: Fundamentals
LVL 19
Exploring ASP.NET Core: Fundamentals

Learn to build web apps and services, IoT apps, and mobile backends by covering the fundamentals of ASP.NET Core and  exploring the core foundations for app libraries.

Several part series to implement Internet Explorer 11 Enterprise Mode
1
Citrix XenApp, Internet Explorer 11 set to Enterprise Mode and using central hosted sites.xml file.
4
Publications banner
I annotated my article on ransomware somewhat extensively, but I keep adding new references and wanted to put a link to the reference library.  Despite all the reference tools I have on hand, it was not easy to find a way to do this easily. I finally found a way that suited my needs.
1
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:William Nettmann
I learned something from the article|blog post|diary entry no matter how it is categorised or what you call it. I am not academically trained, and this may have just opened up a new world for (to?) me.

Thanks!
0
LVL 33

Author Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
William,

You are welcome. I wanted to somehow share my experience so that others could go right to the solution,  instead of having to plod through the same process.
0
My Dock
Do you come here a lot? Are you lazy like me and don't want to go through the "trouble" of having to click your Dock's Safari icon and then having to click your Experts Exchange Favorites bookmark to get here? Well then this article is for you.
8
Introduction
If you're like most people, you have occasionally made a typographical error when you're entering information into an online form.  And to your consternation, the browser remembers the error, and offers to autocomplete your future entries by using the typographical error.  This is somewhat annoying, and if you're paying attention, you can visually identify the error.  You can usually get past this issue by telling the browser to forget your recent history.  But have you ever begun typing your password or passphrase into an online form and thought, "Did I get that right?"  You can't visually check your work because the browser is showing you a form input field with something like this: ········· The browser is "helpfully" hiding the password from prying eyes by masking the input control field.

This article teaches three ways to allow your clients to show or hide the password fields as they type them into your forms.  In my experience, the default behavior that hides the password input is only marginally useful.  Most of the time nobody is looking over your shoulder and the real risk of lost passwords does not rest with the human client or the client browser, but with the servers where passwords are stored.  We can't change the server's security, but we can choose to make life easier for our (human) clients!

How HTML <input type="password"> Works
HTML defines several different input types for different kinds of input controls
5
You have seen this as an option on your internet browser before or it may be completely new to you. But what does this mean and why would I use this?
4

Web Browsers

40K

Solutions

38K

Contributors

Web browsers are applications used primarily to display documents, files and media from the Internet, identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) that can be a page, image, video or other file. Some browsers require the use of add-ons or extensions to safely render the information they receive; others have systems built into them to perform the same functions.