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Windows 2000

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Solutions

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Windows 2000 is an operating system for use on both client and server computers. It is the successor to Windows NT 4.0, and is the last version of Microsoft Windows to display the "Windows NT" designation. Four editions of Windows 2000 were released (Professional, Server, Advanced Server, and Datacenter Server) that shared a core set of features, including many system utilities such as the Microsoft Management Console. All versions of the operating system support NTFS 3.0, Encrypting File System, as well as basic and dynamic disk storage. The Windows 2000 Server family includes support for Active Directory services, Distributed File System and fault-redundant storage volumes.

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Make Windows 10 Look Like Earlier Versions of Windows with Classic Shell
Windows 8 came with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from that interface was a Start button and Start Menu. Microsoft responded to negative user feedback of the Metro interface, bringing back the Start button and Start Menu in Windows 10. However, even though there are widespread reports that users like the Windows 10 interface better than the Windows 8 one, many users still prefer the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows XP, and even (my personal favorite) Windows 2000. This video Micro Tutorial explains how to achieve the W7, XP, or 2K interface on your Windows 10 computer with an excellent, free product called Classic Shell.
Windows 8 came with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from that interface was a Start button and Start Menu. Microsoft responded to negative user feedback of the Metro interface, bringing back the Start button and Start Menu in Windows 10. However, even though there are widespread reports that users like the Windows 10 interface better than the Windows 8 one, many users still prefer the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows XP, and even (my personal favorite) Windows 2000. This video Micro Tutorial explains how to achieve the Windows 7 or Windows XP or Windows 2000 interface on your Windows 10 computer with an excellent, free product called Classic Shell.

1. Download the installer for the software


Visit the Classic Shell website at:
http://www.classicshell.net/

Click the Download Now
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LVL 21

Expert Comment

by:Ramin
Very Good Tutorial.
0
 
LVL 56

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Ramin,
Thank you for the compliment — I really appreciate it! Regards, Joe
0
Free Tool: Port Scanner
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Free Tool: Port Scanner

Check which ports are open to the outside world. Helps make sure that your firewall rules are working as intended.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Move the Taskbar to Create Additional Vertical Screen Space
In this video, we discuss why the need for additional vertical screen space has become more important in recent years, namely, due to the transition in the marketplace of 4x3 computer screens to 16x9 and 16x10 screens (so-called widescreen format). We then explain how to increase the vertical screen space by moving the taskbar off the bottom of the screen to the left side of the screen. We show this in Windows 7, but the technique also works in XP, Vista, and Windows 8.

1. Access the Taskbar Properties.

There are two ways to access the Taskbar Properties.

The first is to right-click in an open space on the taskbar, which brings up a context menu. From the context menu, select "Properties" and this will show all options related to the Taskbar (and Start Menu).

Alternatively, the easier way to get to the Properties is via your Control Panel. Open Control Panel and select the "Taskbar and Start Menu" applet. This will show the same options as the first method.
context menu

2. Try out the Auto-hide feature.

Auto-hide will allow the Taskbar to hide when you are not near it.

To enable this feature, tick the "Auto-hide the taskbar" box in Properties and click "Apply". Move the mouse towards the bottom of the screen to see how distracting Auto-hide is (and why many users don't like it).

After trying it, un-tick the "Auto-hide the taskbar" box in Properties and click "Apply" again.

auto-hide

3. Review the time and date display by hovering the mouse over the time on the far right side of the Taskbar.

This shows the day of the week and date in a pop-up bubble. This functionality will change once we move our Taskbar to the left.
date and time

4. Return to your Taskbar Properties.

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Make Windows 8 Look Like Earlier Versions of Windows with Classic Shell
Windows 8 comes with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from the new interface is a Start button and Start Menu. Many users do not like it, much preferring the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows XP, and even (my personal favorite) Windows 2000. This video Micro Tutorial explains how to achieve the W7, XP, or 2K interface on your Windows 8 computer with an excellent, free product called Classic Shell.

1. Download the installer for the software



Visit the Classic Shell website at:

http://www.classicshell.net/

Click the Download Now button.

Save the downloaded installer (ClassicShellSetup_latest_version_number.exe) wherever you want.

Step1.jpg

2. Run the installer



Locate the downloaded installer in Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you use) and run it.

Step2.jpg

3. Select the options



There are four main options: Classic Explorer, Classic Start Menu, Classic IE, Classic Shell Update. It defaults to installing all four, but you may select whichever ones you want.

Step3.jpg

4. Complete the setup wizard



You will now have a Start button and Start Menu.

Step4.jpg

5. Right-click on the new Start button and select Settings



There are many tabs in Settings. Click each of them and select whichever settings you want. Examples are the Start Menu Style tab, where you may select the Windows 7 or Windows XP or Windows 2000 interface, and the Windows 8 Settings tab, where you may Skip Metro screen upon startup, thereby bringing you straight into the desktop.

Step5.jpg

6. Left-click the new Start button



You will now have whatever interface you selected, i.e., W7, XP, or 2K.

Step6.jpg
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Expert Comment

by:gwiensx
When I recently purchased my inexpensive Dell desktop machine, it came with Windows 8.something. As I quickly discovered, it was designed around touch-screen technology, and I became frustrated very quickly.

Fortunately, I ran across Classic Shell which does a pretty good job hiding the deplorable Win 8 UI. I don't know what M$ was thinking, but they lost me way back as with each release, more eye candy and less functionality.

Thanks for the shell!
0
 
LVL 56

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi gwiensx,
You're welcome! And thanks to you for the feedback. I'm glad that Classic Shell makes your new W8 machine more usable — I wouldn't be without it on my W8 computers. Btw, if you found this video to be helpful, please take a moment to click the Good Video Micro Tutorial? button underneath the video window above — I'll really appreciate it! Thanks, Joe
0

Windows 2000

37K

Solutions

32K

Contributors

Windows 2000 is an operating system for use on both client and server computers. It is the successor to Windows NT 4.0, and is the last version of Microsoft Windows to display the "Windows NT" designation. Four editions of Windows 2000 were released (Professional, Server, Advanced Server, and Datacenter Server) that shared a core set of features, including many system utilities such as the Microsoft Management Console. All versions of the operating system support NTFS 3.0, Encrypting File System, as well as basic and dynamic disk storage. The Windows 2000 Server family includes support for Active Directory services, Distributed File System and fault-redundant storage volumes.

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